Rural round-up

December 7, 2016

Thousands of salmon killed in farm break-in:

Thousands of salmon have been killed during a burglary at a salmon farm on the West Coast.

Police are investigating the burglary at the South Westland Salmon Farm and Cafe in Paringa on Saturday.

Offenders entered the farm grounds that night and tampered with machinery on site.

The police said the intruders shut off the water supply to the salmon-rearing tanks, causing at least 13,000 fish to suffocate from a lack of oxygen. . . 

Gap between town and country growing – James Stewart:

As the world’s population grows, so too does urbanisation.  Towns turn into cities, houses into apartment blocks and the gap between urban and rural broadens.  However the divide left is not just physical.  It also creates a void of knowledge about what goes on in our rural communities.

Today’s urbanised generations are arguably more informed than ever. Thanks to technology, information is at our finger tips, and there are plenty of other opportunities to learn. Advertising is a multimillion dollar business for a reason. A few seconds air time is all it needs to cast a net on an audience, influencing their thoughts with the end goal of enticing them to buy a product, or view the world through a different lens. . . 

Results Announced for the 2016 Fonterra Elections:

Returning Officer Warwick Lampp, of electionz.com Ltd, has declared the final results of the 2016 elections for the Fonterra Board of Directors, Directors’ Remuneration Committee, Fonterra Farmer Custodian Trustee and Shareholders’ Council.

Shareholders voted to elect incumbent Director Michael Spaans and new Director Donna Smit. Stuart Nattrass was unsuccessful.

Donna Smit lives and farms at Edgecumbe, and has built and owned seven dairy farms in Eastern Bay of Plenty and Oamaru. Donna is a Director of Ballance Agri Nutrients and Primary ITO, and a Trustee of Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre and Eastern Bay Energy Trust. Donna is a Chartered Accountant and was Company Administrator at Kiwifruit Co-operative EastPack for 24 years. . . 

Quake creates massive lake on family farm – Emma Cropper,

A giant lake and three-metre-high wall have been created on a family farm near Waiau, revealing the massive power of November’s earthquake.

Geotech scientists from around the world are scrambling to see the newly formed ‘Lake Rebekah’ and the ‘Waiau wall’ on the Kelly family’s farm.

The family is dwarfed by the sheer size of the rupture that’s torn straight through their property, forming a giant wall hidden in the hills of the farm. . . 

Northland irrigation study welcomed :

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed an investment of $165,000 from Crown Irrigation Investments to scope irrigation scheme options in Northland.

“This is great news for a region that has suffered numerous droughts over the years,” says Mr Guy.

“Storing water means we can use it in dry spells, giving farmers and growers certainty and a real boost to the local economy.” 

Northland Regional Council are also investing in the study which will focus on potential irrigation options in the mid North and Kaipara areas. . . 

Rural quake damage tipped at $40m – Alexa Cook:

Rural insurance company FMG estimates that at least $40m of claims will be made from the 7.8 earthquake and aftershocks.

FMG’s Chief Operations Officer Conrad Wilkshire said the firm insured about half of the farms and rural businesses in the Kaikōura, North Canterbury and Marlborough districts.

Mr Wilkshire said so far they had received about 700 insurance claims from 500 businesses. . . 

Kotahi partners with Cape Sanctuary:

Kotahi, the country’s largest export supply chain collaboration, has signed a long-term partnership with Cape Sanctuary, a significant wildlife restoration programme at Cape Kidnappers, in a bid to protect native New Zealand birds.

Cape Sanctuary Co-founder Andy Lowe said Kotahi’s partnership will allow two additional New Zealand native species, the near extinct Shore Plover and endangered Blue Duck, to be included in the Cape Sanctuary programme.

“Our philosophy is to develop long-standing partnerships with businesses, iwi and Department of Conservation to restore native bird life to our region. Cape Sanctuary began as a project by people passionate about bringing back and sustaining native species that once would have existed on the Cape Kidnappers peninsula and nearby coastal communities. . . 

Snapper 1 plan accepted:

A long-term plan for the future management of New Zealand’s most valuable snapper fishery has been accepted by Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy today.

“The Snapper 1 Management Plan is the result of more than two years hard work by the SNA1 Strategy Group, which is made up of members from the customary, recreational and commercial fishing sectors,” says Mr Guy.

“This fishery includes Bay of Plenty, the Hauraki Gulf and the eastern coast of Northland and is one of our most iconic inshore fisheries. It’s pleasing to have a range of perspectives sitting around the table and coming up with a long term plan for maximising the benefits for everyone.” . . 

Top winery proposes vineyard village in Central Otago:

Leading Central Otago winery Wooing Tree Vineyard has today released plans that will enable the development of a boutique residential and commercial space designed to complement its wine business in Cromwell.

A zone change will need to be granted by the Central Otago District Council (CODC) to facilitate the development of the proposed Wooing Tree Estate, which is pegged for the vineyard’s 26-hectare site between SH6, SH8B and Shortcut Road. While Wooing Tree Vineyard will remain at the site, the new development could include various community amenities, tourist attractions, retail, accommodation and prime housing lots. . . 

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Rural round-up

October 25, 2016

Golden harvest from Fiordland farm – Sally Rae:

Growing saffron and Fiordland might sound an unlikely combination.

But Te Anau couple Steve and Jo Daley have big plans for their fledgling organic operation with an ambitious goal of becoming world-renowned for the costly spice.

“It’s just so damn exciting, the product, and people are so interested in what we’re doing,” Mr Daley said.

Mr and Mrs Daley have 1.5million crocus corms on their property and their intention is to  increase that  to 50million, which would make them the biggest saffron producers in New Zealand.

With a day job as a fencing contractor, Mr Daley, while stationed behind the post driver, got thinking about other ways to make a living.  . . 

Sand and milk: Dairy farming in the desert – Sally Rae:

For Clayton Buckley, the past 12 years working for Almarai — the world’s largest vertically integrated dairy company — have been quite an experience.

Suffice to say, it was ‘‘not like farming here’’, he said during a recent visit home. 

Mr Buckley (35) was brought up in North Canterbury, where his father Russ was a ‘‘part-time’’ deer farmer.

He used to head south during school holidays to stay with his aunt and uncle Gail and Trevor Meikle and help on their farm, near Oamaru.

He enjoyed it so much that when he was about nine, he announced to his parents he was going to buy Mr and Mrs Meikle’s farm, he recalled. . . 

Quad bike deaths at record high – Catherine Hutton:

The number of deaths from quad bike accidents has reached a record annual high of 14, and an agriculture expert says the rate is predicted to rise.

A quad bike accident in Taupō on Saturday night left one person dead and another with moderate injuries, bringing the number of deaths from quad bikes this year to 14, a record for a single year.

The former director of Lincoln University’s Telford campus, Charley Lamb, said the deaths were occurring as a result of crush injuries, which research showed roll bars would prevent.

“Very few bikes have roll over protection, which of course they should do. Whether people want to debate that and argue that, they can. But they used to do the same about safety frames on tractors and they did the same about seatbelts in cars.” . . 

DIRA changes don’t go far enough – Neal Wallace:

Fonterra has criticised proposed changes to the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act as not going far enough because they continue to impose constraints on the co-operative that help its competitors.  

The proposed changes to DIRA announced by Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy provided a mixed bag for Fonterra which its Farm Source chief operating officer Miles Hurrell labelled a “lost opportunity to address artificial constraints”.  

While an end was in sight for the requirement to sell milk to its largest competitors, Hurrell said Fonterra was still obligated to accept and process all milk produced which meant shareholders having to invest in stainless steel. . . 

Age ousts three directors – Sally Rae:

Three directors, including founder and chairman Graham Cooney, have stepped down from the board of Blue Sky Meats due to an age-related clause in the company’s constitution.

A letter sent to suppliers of the Southland-based meat company this week, signed by chairman Scott O’Donnell and directors Peter Carnahan and Andy Lowe, said Mr Cooney, Peter Houlker and Malcolm McMillan were unable to continue as the constitution precluded any individual from being a director once they reached 65. . . 

Don’t blame staff – Annette Scott:

Agri businesses are bad at attracting the right staff rather than being victims of a shortage of skilled and experienced people, Synlait Milk chief executive John Penno says.  

“Effectively, I’m saying our primary industry business models are not strong enough to compete for the right people.  

“We need leaders growing up in our businesses and we need businesses growing these leaders.”  Penno focused on the challenges of knowledge and skills for land-based industries towards 2030, in a presentation to an Agricultural and Horticultural Science Institute forum.  

“This really made me think,” Penno said. . . 

A changing of the guard for DWN:

Dairy Women’s Network has a new skipper at the helm after today’s AGM, with incumbent chair Justine Kidd stepping down and Cathy Brown of Pahoia being warmly welcomed into the role.

A crowd of about 60 DWN members, staff and sponsors gathered at Wintec in Hamilton today to celebrate another successful year for the 9000-strong not-for-profit organisation that is dedicated to supporting and inspiring women to succeed in the business of dairying.

Brown has been involved with DWN since the late 90s, first hearing about the organisation when she worked at CRV Ambreed. She quickly became a member of what was at that point a largely internet based network and attended the organisation’s first conference in 2001. . . 


Cathy Brown (left) with Justine Kidd.

‘Good dog’ makes dog training easier – Anna Holland:

Two words I find invaluable when training dogs are “good dog”.

The secret to their effectiveness is understanding, timing and correct usage; overuse them and their power is lost.

Not only do you need to understand when and how to use “good dog”, but the dog needs to understand the meaning. I once commented to someone, “You never say ‘good dog’.” And the next thing he was like a stuck record with the words; the trouble is he may as well have been speaking a foreign language because the words had no meaning for his dogs. . . 


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