Rural round-up

November 20, 2014

Further GDT drop leaves farmers uncertain:

Another drop in the GlobalDairyTrade of 3.1 percent will be a huge disappointment to New Zealand’s dairy farmers.

“It goes without saying that the lowest auction price in five years is going to be a blow to the industry,” says Andrew Hoggard, Federated Farmers Dairy Chair.

“Dairy farmers were hoping to see a lift or at least a plateau to realise Fonterra’s $5.30 forecast in December. So this further drop increases the uncertainty of how realistic that goal is. . .

 

New devices target specific pests:

New advanced pest control using devices to target specific species is being hailed as the latest tools in controlling them on farms and diseases such as tuberculosis.

Researchers are meeting at Massey University at the New Zealand Ecological Society Conference.

James Ross, a senior lecturer in wildlife management at Lincoln, said advanced multi-delivery traps called spitfire were capable of killing up to 100 animals before needing to be restocked with poison.

He said they were a major breakthrough in the control and eradication of pests including stoats and possums. . .

Federated Farmers and Forest & Bird welcome Predator Free NZ project:

Federated Farmers and the conservation organisation Forest & Bird are welcoming the Predator Free New Zealand initiative as an ambitious but achievable project that will have real benefits for conservation and the economy.

The Predator Free New Zealand Trust was launched today at the “A Place to Live,” conference in Whanganui.

Federated Farmers and Forest & Bird are actively supporting the Predator Free mission – of clearing New Zealand of all rats, stoats, ferrets, possums, and feral cats. Both organisations have many members who are already actively controlling introduced predators. . .

Sanford lifts profit despite ‘challenging year’ – Suze Metherell:

(BusinessDesk) – Sanford, New Zealand’s largest listed fishing group, lifted annual profit 10 percent as gains in its deepwater fishing and aquaculture operations offset falling skipjack tuna prices.

Tax-paid profit before minority interests rose to $22.4 million in the year ended Sept. 30, from $20.4 million a year earlier, the Auckland-based fisher said in a statement. Sales fell 2.2 percent to $452.4 million, reflecting “highly variable operational performance across the business”, which saw the Australian arm continue to trade unprofitably.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation fell by 5 percent to $46.7 million in the first year under new leadership since the departure of veteran former chief executive Eric Barratt. . .

 

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Director Elections:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd is calling for nominations to stand for two farmer-elected director positions on its board.

They are for the Northern North Island and Northern South Island electorates.

Nominations need to be made to the Beef + Lamb New Zealand returning officer, Warwick Lampp by 5pm on Friday 19 December. Farmers can call him on 0508 666 447 to get information on how to make a nomination. . .

 

Young Friesian follows in father’s fertile footsteps:

Herd improvement company CRV Ambreed has cause to celebrate this month as its top performing bull, Aljo TEF Maelstrom, continues to prove his strong genetic value.

Maelstrom has broken the 300 mark on both Breeding Worth (BW) and New Zealand Merit Index (NZMI) indexes; a first for any CRV Ambreed bull since the company was established 45 years ago.

CRV Ambreed’s managing director Angus Haslett explained the indexes. . .

 


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