Rural round-up

October 4, 2018

NZ’s pig-headed rejection of GM is putting our agricultural future at risk – Andrew Allan:

Ignorance of the facts of genetic modification poses an economic risk to New Zealand, writes a professor of plant biology.

There is a new agricultural-based green revolution beginning around the world, and it’s a technique you’ve probably heard of before: gene editing. New types of rice, wheat, tomato, maize, soybean and other crops created through the CRISPR-Cas9 technology are already growing in fields in America and beyond. These enhanced products include wheat with a 30% increase in grain weight and tomatoes with a 5-fold increase in vitamin A levels. The issue however is that these crops rely on ‘directed’ changes to DNA, which we categorise as ‘genetic modification’ (GM) under NZ law. This is despite the fact that the changes made are exactly the same as that created by sunlight, and a lot less than that from traditional breeding. This categorisation makes it near-impossible for our country to join this green revolution. Worse still, the value we currently gain from our plant-based economy is under threat from far better crops being developed quickly around the world. . .

Sheep and beef farmers bullish about the future but watchful of challenging headwinds:

More than two thirds of sheep and beef farmers are positive about the future of the industry, according to research by Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ).

Sixty-eight per cent of sheep and beef farmers surveyed in the August 2018 quarter are confident – the highest level since B+LNZ’s first launched the research in November 2010.

Sheep and beef farmers’ positive mood contrasts with gloomy headlines on business confidence elsewhere in the economy, as well as recent inaccurate claims made by the Productivity Commission about the “marginal” nature of the sector. . .

Using images to misinform – Alison Campbell:

The internet, while it can be a godsend if you need to find something out (gotta love google maps for directions), can also be a wretched hive of wrongness and misinformation.

That misinformation can take many forms, but when it comes to 1080 it’s clear that those opposed to NZ’s use of this chemical firmly believe that a picture is worth a thousand words. Any picture.

Thank goodness for the ‘reverse image search’ function in Google. For example, on the Facebook page for the group New Zealands not clean green, in amongst photos of animals that may or may not have been killed by 1080, we find several of animals that weren’t. For example: . .

More farmers turn to DNA parentage testing to improve productivity:

This spring, upwards of 250,000 calves from around the country will have their parentage confirmed by LIC’s DNA parentage service which operates from its laboratory in Hamilton. So far this year, the co-operative has had on average one new herd a day sign up to its DNA parentage service.

LIC’s General Manager of NZ Markets, Malcolm Ellis, says the increased demand reflects the industry’s new reality of “peak cow”. . .

Wrightson Seeds suitor DLF cites research capability, export growth –  Gavin Evans:

(BusinessDesk) – Danish producer DLF Seeds says its research capability makes it a strong potential acquirer of PGG Wrightson’s grains and seeds business. The firm is seeking clearance from the Commerce Commission for the $421 million purchase announced in August. . .

Silver Fern Farms Announce Winners of Plate to Pasture Youth Scholarships 2018:

Six inspirational young people from around New Zealand have been named as the Silver Fern Farms Plate to Pasture Youth Scholarships recipients for 2018. Each winner received $5000 to further their careers in the red meat sector. Silver Fern Farms Chief Executive Simon Limmer says he is delighted to see the passion young New Zealanders have shown for the red meat industry through the applications submitted to the annual scholarship programme.

   

Rural round-up

October 11, 2017

Fall in farm worker deaths ‘encouraging’ – Alexa Cook:

The number of deaths and serious injuries in the farming sector have dropped this year.

Figures from WorkSafe show that this year, up until 1 October, there have been nine deaths in agricultural workplaces, compared to an average of 15 deaths for the same period each year from 2014 to 2016.

Statistics show that the agricultural sector has had almost four times the number of workplace deaths than forestry, construction and manufacturing since 2011. . . 

Nine vying for three spots in Farmlands director elections – Sally Rae:

Voting is open in this year’s Farmlands director elections and there is a strong southern presence among the South Island candidates.

Nine candidates will contest the three director vacancies this year, with elections required in both the North and South Islands.

The South Island vacancy will be contested by former long-serving Alliance Group director Murray Donald (Winton), former Otago regional councillor Gary Kelliher (Alexandra), accountant Mel Montgomery (Southland), former Federated Farmers national board member David Rose (Southland) and current Alliance Group director Dawn Sangster (Maniototo). . . 

Alliance plans capital spending of $54:

Alliance Group is investing $54million in capital expenditure during the next year.

Outlining the investment at a series of roadshows throughout the country, chief executive David Surveyor said the success of the business strategy meant the co-operative was in a position to reinvest to continue to build the company’s operational performance.

In addition to a pool payment, the company would have a bonus share issue and reward farmer shareholders by increasing their shareholding in the co-operative.

The level would be based upon the supply of lambs, sheep, cattle, calves and deer during the 2017-18 season, Mr Surveyor said in a statement. . . 

Possum peppering – still totally implausible, seven years on – Alison Campbell:

Kerikeri award entry turns possums into burning issue“, proclaims a headline in the Northern Advocate.

The story is about an entry in the WWF-NZ’s Conservation Awards for 2017; I hope the judges have a good grasp of science and scientific method. From the article:

The entry from Kerikeri promotes a new take on an old-world biodynamic method of ridding fields of rodents and other furry pests.

It is called peppering, and involves burning the pelts and carcasses of said pests until they’re little more than ash, grinding it finely, mixing it with water and “spray painting” the substance back on the affected land.

Apparently, this version of the ‘traditional’ practice is new in the sense that so far it has not been applied because it lacked ‘scientific background’. . . 

Sheep Meat And Beef Levies to Remain Unchanged:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) announced today that sheep meat and beef levies will remain unchanged for the levy year commencing 1 October 2017.

B+LNZ Chairman James Parsons says the Board has reviewed budgets and activities for the financial year commencing 1 October 2017 and that the sheep meat levy on all sheep slaughtered would remain $0.60 per head and the beef levy, on all cattle slaughtered (including beef cattle and dairy cattle but excluding bobby calves), at $4.40 per head GST (exclusive). . . 

Voting for the 2017 Fonterra elections and resolutions underway:

Voting is now open for the 2017 Fonterra Board of Directors’ Elections, the Shareholders’ Councillor Elections in 10 wards, and six Annual Meeting resolutions.

This year Shareholders have the opportunity to elect three Fonterra Directors. The three candidates are Independent Nomination process candidates Brent Goldsack, Andy Macfarlane and John Monaghan. Each candidate requires Shareholder support of over 50% of votes to be elected. . . 

Farmers Fast Five: John McCaskey – Claire Inkson:

Farmers Fast Five : Where we ask a Farmer five quick questions about farming, and what agriculture means to them. Today we talk to John McCaskey : Pioneer of the Wine Industry, Farmers Advocate, Entrepreneur, and Proud Farmer.

1….How long have you been farming?

Since I was big enough to hold a bottle and feed a lamb—say 1939! My infant years were filled with helping feed pigs & chooks progressing to milking the house cow and churning butter after school! By age 10 I was going to be a farmer! I passed all agriculture subjects for School Cert 1954 . . 

New deal sees Palgrove partner with NZ super fund

Leading Queensland seedstock producers, David and Prue Bondfield, Palgrove, are the latest agribusiness to partner with a superannuation fund in order to grow their business.

The Bondfield family released a statement on Wednesday saying their business, had entered into a partnership with the New Zealand Superannuation Fund (NZSF). The terms of the transaction remain confidential.​  . . 

Select Harvest rejects Arab takeover, launches $65m local capital raising – Andrew Marshall:

Select Harvest has more than 7000 hectares of almond plantations likely to deliver about 15,800 tonnes of crop next year.

Hot on the heels of rejecting a $430 million Arab takeover offer, big almond growing and nut processing business, Select Harvest, has launched a share market capital raising bid for about $65m.

Select has already placed 10.7m new shares worth about $45m with institutional investors. . .

 

 


Rural round-up

January 28, 2016

Rural to benefit:

Rural fire chief Mike Grant hopes the intentions outlined in Fire Service reform documents become reality.  

Grant, the principal rural fire officer for the Southern Rural Fire Authority, said much of the detail was unknown because it had still to be discussed by Cabinet but there was a consistent message on how the new management entity should operate in the review document, submissions and analysis. . . 

Dairy farming best choice for Dairy Woman Network local co-convenor

Matamata sharemilker Suzie van Heuven could not imagine going back to working in town.

The Dairy Woman Network (DWN) co-convenor for the East Waikato group is hooked on dairy farming.

That might not be surprising seeing she grew up on a farm in Waitoa except for the fact that her high school career ambition was to be a vet or a cop.

But while waiting to be old enough to apply for the police force she dabbled in the dairy industry and by 2011, had progressed to farm manager. During that time she was involved in the Ngarua Young Farmers club, where she met her future husband, Alex. . . 

Despite Expected Milk Price Correction, 45 Cent Drop is a Sobering Blow to Farmers:

Fonterra Shareholders’ Council Chairman, Duncan Coull, said that today’s announcement of a 45 cent drop in the 2015/16 forecast F from $4.60 kg/MS to $4.15 kg/MS, is one that will further amplify the effects of the current low milk price environment on Farmers and their businesses.

Duncan Coull: “Farmers are very aware that this is a global story which is now having a significant local effect. Strong supply out of Europe coupled with flat demand is driving market sentiment as evidenced by the GDT results. . .

More moo woo – Alison Campbell:

Once I started paying attention to the woo around milk I realised how much of it there is. And how ready people are to accept it.

I’ve written about the notoriously non-scientific Food Babe before. Someone with a high pain threshold could probably manage a daily blog post on this young woman and the way she manipulates opinion, and sometimes sells the very things she inveighs against… But I digress!

Today I noticed she’s shared a link about how drinking milk encourages the development of osteoporosis. I was mildly suspicious about the source (‘healthy-holistic-living.com) but before taking a look, I skimmed the comments. Oh dear. . . 

New Science Challenge to boost land productivity and the environment:

Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce today launched the Our Land and Water National Science Challenge, which aims to enhance primary sector production and productivity while maintaining and improving land and water quality.

The National Science Challenges are dedicated to breaking new ground in areas of science that are crucial to New Zealand’s future.

“From an economic standpoint they don’t come much more important than this,” Mr Joyce says.  “There is increasing confidence that new agricultural tools will be able achieve both these crucial objectives for New Zealand.  The job of this challenge is to use science to accelerate the development of these tools.” . . 

Welfare of horses and donkeys the focus of a new code:

New minimum standards and best practice guidelines for the management of domestic horses and donkeys have been developed in a new code of welfare.

The new code comes into effect on Thursday (28 January 2016) and includes standards for equine management, food and water requirements, handling, training and equipment, husbandry practices and equine health.

The code has been developed by the National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) and applies to horses, ponies and donkeys and their hybrids kept for any purpose including those kept as companions (pets), for breeding, sport, entertainment or as working animals. The code also applies to foals and any horse captured from the wild. . . .

Retiring Farmers Urged to Consider All Options Before Selling Up:

With succession front of mind for New Zealand agriculture, a North Island sheep and beef farmer turned agribusiness advisor is encouraging farm owners to explore all of the options before settling on a succession plan.

Sean Bennett, a veteran of 20 years on the land prior to becoming an agribusiness advisor for Crowe Horwath, suggests that succession is one of the industry’s biggest challenges over the next decade.

“When you consider the average age of a New Zealand farm owner is marching steadily towards 60, and the forecast capital required to replace their exit has been estimated at over NZ$60 billion, it’s easy to see why there are widely held concerns,” says Bennett. . . 

Soaring Start to Karaka Select Sale:

After just one day of trade at the three-day Karaka 2016 Select Sale the aggregate is already over half of the final aggregate of last year’s Sale, thanks to spirited competition at all levels of the market.

The momentum from the prosperous Premier Sale flowed through to the first day of the Select Sale with the aggregate, average, median and clearance rate tracking higher than Day One of the Sale last year, with two days of the Sale remaining. . . 

 

American Cattlemen's photo.


Did you see the one about . . .

June 26, 2010

 Going post-espresso with Chemex – Half Pie takes a scientific approach to coffee.

The tyrrany of power point – Alison Campbell at Sciblogs on the pluses and minuses of technological assistance in communication.

All White on the Night – Opposable Thumb takes us down several pegs.

Blocking out the still small voice – NZ Conservative on the necessity of boredom and also Churchill become non-smoker via air brush –  fags (of the tobacco kind) are censored but S&M isn’t.

The decline of civilisation – Not PC on questions. While there Roll it experimental housing- University of Karlsruhe is also worth a look.

A blog of one’s own – Schroedinger’s Tabby turns two.

Public Opinion – Quote Unquote on modern media.

Houston we have . . . . a lot of snow – Laughy Kate reports on gameshow recruits.

 At the end of the earth  Latitude 44 muses on cultural identity


Did you see the one about . . .

May 28, 2010

Milk and health: there aren’t always two (equal) sides to a story – what Alison Campbell at Sciblogs  learned at the gym; she also had a trip to the optometrists because of flashes in the eye.

John Freeman on Shrinking the World – Quote Unquote learned about slow communication at Writers and Readers.

Finger tutting – Ozy Mandias Warning on geometircal dexterity.

Heritage Irises – a blog celebrating irises which gives a promise of spring to brighten winter.

Four essential questions for government – Inquiring Mind on the need to focus on benefit and value.

Murphy’s Law – RivettingKateTaylor had one of those moments when Toyota isn’t strong enough.

At the risk of stirring old broth – Laughy Kate has a number joke which leads to a number of others in the comments.

Book sales, frumpy readers and mental rotation of book titles – Grant Jacobs from Sciblogs went to the Regent Theatre 24 hour book sale.

Congratulations to the Visible Hand in Economics on 1000 posts .

And an announcement that Agridata has moved to interest.co.nz


Did you see the one about . . .

May 16, 2010

Want to win $100,000? rivettingKateTaylor has a run down on the National Bank Young Farmer of the Year finalists. 

Death shapes us all – Alison Campbell at Sciblogs finds death contributes to life.

She also looks at sensing nonsense and gives the reporter an F for assertions not based on facts.

Dig in or adapt. The effect of political views on changing one’s mind – still at Sciblogs, Darcy Cowan looks at the persistance of political misperceptions.

What would I like to see . . . Adolf at No Minister gives his Budget requests.

Day 13 – done! – there’s a new kitchen at In A Strange Land.

Unemployment solved!! Anti Dismal isn’t convinced.

ELEPHANTÉ  Today Is My Birthday on miniature elephants  (Hat Tip Sentence of the day from Quote Unquote).


Did you see the one about . . .

February 23, 2010

Unemployment – Something Goes Here has a cracker cartoon from Garrick Tremain.

A rural joke – Quote Unquote on sounds you hear on most farms (Though not Rob’s father’s).

Warning food is a choking hazard – Opinionated Mummy on the danger of warnings against danger.

How I became a Science teacher from Alison Campbell at Sciblogs and on a similar theme: Career Day – Rivetting Kate Taylor on how she got into journalism.

So good I stole it – Adolf at No Minister  and Dos and don’ts for cuddle class – Kiwiblog  illustrates in-flight etiquette.

Come take my stuff – Roar Prawn warns that technology can tell too much.

Top 10 at 10 Interest.co.nz has some funny cartoons among the serious stuff.

How not to define social sciences at Anti Dismal  . 

Exaggerating the benefits of Community Education at The Visable Hand In Economics and apropos of this Really big numbers at Off Setting Behaviour.


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