Rural round-up

July 12, 2015

Merino school jersey success – Sally Rae:

 With a passion for New Zealand wool, it was only natural that Banks Peninsula farmers Carl and Tori Uren dressed their four young children in merino clothing.

But when their eldest daughter Annabel turned 5, they were disappointed to find the only jersey option for the school uniform was made from polar fleece.

Believing there had to be another option, the sheep and beef farmers made some inquiries and were disappointed to find merino jerseys were not available. . .

Safe workplace culture ‘comes from within’ – Sue O’Dowd:

Changes around health and safety need to come from the community and from industry, says a Taranaki Worksafe leader.

“It’s not going to be the regulator that makes the change,” WorkSafe assessment manager Jill Manaia told about 200 people at this week’s NZ Ground Spreader Fertiliser Association conference in New Plymouth. “It’s industry and the community who decide what’s important.” 

She said Worksafe was tasked with leading a step change in health and safety performance in New Zealand to reduce fatalities and serious harm by 25 per cent by 2020.

“Whatever we’ve been doing hasn’t worked. We’re killing too many people – each statistic is a family member, a business member, a guy who has to be replaced and who is no longer part of society. If someone is killed or injured at your business, it’s likely you knew them well.” . . .

Export conditions still tough – Neal Wallace:

If last year proved tough for exporters they are unlikely to get much of a reprieve in the coming season.

A combination of economic upheaval in key markets and high production from competing exporters threatens to overshadow the looming export season before it even starts.

Rabobank’s dairy research director Hayley Moynihan said this season would be tough but some of that impact could be softened by an easing NZ dollar. . .

All atwitter over beef Wellington – Rod Slater:

Before our very eyes, the way we advertise our products is changing rapidly.

No longer can we refer to a marketing plan which includes the traditional mix of television, print, radio, outdoor and a touch of online marketing, as strong.

Online marketing is without a doubt “taking over the world” and I’m certainly not one for closing my eyes to the inevitable. In fact, I’m predicting the social media and the online space will quickly begin to absorb the majority of our costs when it comes to allocating advertising spend. . .

 

Outram’s Johnstones win again – Sally Rae:

Outram Limousin breeders Rob and Jean Johnstone have done it again.

The couple have been awarded the Alan Dodd Trophy for the overall champion in the annual Otago Southland beef carcass competition, which attracted 38 entries. . .

Governance skills a priority for new apiculture body:

Federated Farmers is calling for people with bee industry experience and skills to apply for positions on the Interim Apiculture Industry Governance Board (IGB). The IGB emerged out of the merger between Federated Farmers Bees, Honey Packers and Exporters Association and National Beekeepers Association at the New Zealand Apiculture Conference last month.

The interim working group member and Federated Farmers Bee Industry Group Vice-Chairman, Peter Bell, says it is vital to have the best people to navigate a way to structure and fund the apiculture industry. . .


Rural round-up

July 4, 2012

Lifting Maori Business – Sheryl Brown:

Life works in mysterious ways according to Roku Mihinui, chair of Kapenga M Trust, the winner of the BNZ Maori Excellence in Farming Award for Dairy, 2012.

After accepting the Ahuwhenua Trophy on behalf of farm staff and the Trust’s 915 shareholders, Mihinui confessed the 998 cow dairy operation found themselves short of milk for cups of tea at their field day during the competition.

“My daughter was helping with the catering and she asked me where the milk was for cups of tea – we were right beside the milking shed and we had no bloody milk!” The dairy unit is hardly short of milk either – producing in excess of 370,000kg milksolids (MS) this season. Despite the milk mishap and a wet day to showcase the farm, the judges were impressed by the presentation of the property. The Trust beat other finalists Tauhara Moana Trust and Waewaetutuki 10, Wharepi Whanau Trust to take the coveted trophy. . .

Outram breeders win trophy for best carcus – Sally Rae:

Outram Limousin breeders Rob and Jean Johnstone have been awarded the Alan Dodd Trophy for the champion carcass in the annual Otago-Southland beef carcass competition.   

The competition, which attracted 32 entries, was held at the  Alliance Group’s Mataura plant with hoof judging by Mark Cuttance, from PGG Wrightson, and hook judging by Mervyn  Wilson, of the Alliance Group. . .

Animal Welfare Committee annual report:

The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) issued its 2011 Annual Report today.

The development and review of codes of welfare was the main focus of NAWAC’s work in 2011. The Transport within New Zealand Code was issued during the year and the Committee finished deliberations on a review of the Meat Chickens Code and a new Goats Code.

The Transport Code covers all animals transported by land, sea or air within New Zealand. It provides clarity about who is responsible for the welfare of animals at all stages of transportation and gives direction about how this must be achieved.

Committee chairman, John Hellström, said the Code has been rapidly adopted by industry since its launch in September.

“It is gratifying to see this code, like the earlier dairy, sheep and beef and pig codes being widely adopted within industry guidelines.” . . .

The report is here.

Blackenbrook First South Island Winery to be Vegetarian Approved:

 Family owned and operated Blackenbrook Vineyard in Tasman, near Nelson is proud to be the first Vegetarian wine producer in the South Island approved by the New Zealand Vegetarian Society.

Blackenbrook’s white and Rosé wines will carry the Vegetarian Society Approved Trademark (see attached photo) which is run under strict licensing criteria from the UK Vegetarian Society. 

The first wines to be labelled with the distinctive logo will be bottled in early August and include Blackenbrook Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Riesling 2012, Pinot Gris 2012 and Rosé 2012.  Next year Blackenbrook Gewürztraminer, Muscat and Chardonnay will be added to this list. . .

Owaka herd manager is Farming to Succeed:

Owaka herd manager, Shane Bichan, says his eyes have been opened to opportunities in the agriculture industry after attending AgITO’s South Island Farming to Succeed programme sponsored by FIL New Zealand.

“It was brilliant, it was an eye opener, I came home on such a buzz. I came away with a new mentor – course facilitator Grant Taylor is an amazing man.

“He talked about turning your blinkers off and seeing what else is out there – I would’ve been happy to listen to him each day even without the farms we visited. . .

Lucky Young Farmer member awarded trip of a lifetime:

AgriVenture New Zealand has teamed up with New Zealand Young Farmers this year to award an AgriVenture scholarship to one lucky NZYF member.

The scholarship is valued at $7000 and includes a fully paid six to twelve month AgriVenture programme to the recipient’s choice of destination country.

AgriVenture gives young people aged between 18 and 30 the opportunity to travel and work on a farm, in horticulture or home management in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA, Europe and Japan. . .


%d bloggers like this: