Rural round-up

November 30, 2013

Stressed rural families urged to get their men talking:

Families of farmers in Marlborough’s Awatere Valley are being urged to give the men on the farm the chance to talk.

The Top of the South Rural Support Trust says some rural males who live very close to the centre of August’s magnitude 6.6 earthquake at Lake Grassmere, are struggling to cope with the aftermath.

The trust says that it has observed serious signs of stress and depression.

Its field facilitator, Ian Blair, has this advice: “You got to get them into a relaxed attitude, and many times, the easiest way to do that is to sit round the table with a cup of tea. . .

Better management could cut farm emissions – study:

A study suggests greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen leaching on farms can be signficantly reduced if farmers improve they way they manage their properties and use available technology.

The study the Motu Economic and Public Policy Research group used data from more than 260 farms to estimate the potential for reducing emissions and leaching.

Senior fellow Dr Suzi Kerr said the research found the best dairy farm operators are getting at least twice the milk production for each kilogram of nitrogen released. .  .

Paua battle almost over:

Last Wednesday, the Ministry for Primary Industries convened a meeting of over 15 key stakeholder representatives at Otakou Marae, Dunedin in an attempt to resolve the long-running battle over a proposal to open up closed populations of paua to commercial fishing.

Nine months after passionate New Zealanders first mobilised in their fight to protect one of the treasures of New Zealand’s south, the battle is finally drawing to a close.

This was the last of 3 meetings convened by MPI to uncover and report on further evidence and seek agreement from all parties about paua and paua diving in these four closed areas. . .

Emerging organic contaminants: A threat to New Zealand freshwaters? Sally Gaw:

Emerging organic contaminants are a burgeoning and extremely diverse class of contaminants that are not routinely monitored and that have the potential to have adverse ecological and human health effects. Emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) include both naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals.

Many of these contaminants may have been present in the environment for a long time but are only now have they become detectable due to advances in analytical chemistry. EOCs include active ingredients in personal care and domestic cleaning products, pesticides, plasticisers, pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones excreted by humans and animals, surfactants and veterinary medicines. Many EOCs are everyday chemicals in widespread use in consumer products. Much research is being devoted internationally to understanding the sources, environmental fate and adverse effects of EOCs. . .

Corbans wins Pure Elite Gold at Air New Zealand Wine Awards:

 Corbans has produced an outstanding result at this year’s prestigious Air New Zealand Wine Awards, with two of their Homestead range being awarded gold medals. 

Corbans Homestead Sauvignon Blanc 2012 won a ‘Pure Elite Gold’ at the Awards Gala in Queenstown over the weekend, one of only seven Sauvignon Blancs to receive the accolade.

The Sauvignon Blanc and Corbans Homestead Riesling 2012 had earlier won a ‘Pure Gold’ in their respective classes for their 100% sustainable wines. . .


Rural round-up

November 20, 2013

Speech to the New Zealand Society of Large Dams (NZSOLD) – Nathan Guy:

. . . For over a century, dams and the infrastructure associated with them have been a vital but often overlooked part of the fabric of this country.

Back in the 1880s, gold dredgers dammed a tributary of the Shotover River to provide hydropower for the nearby mine.

Early freezing works and dairy factories ran on hydro and it even helped power early municipal lighting at Reefton on the West Coast.

Today we still tend to associate dams with generating electricity for the national grid.

We think of Benmore, Tekapo and Clyde in the South Island, and the massive Tongariro Power Development here in the North.

Dams – a variety of roles

In fact dams and reservoirs  – large and small – contribute to our society in a variety of ways. . .

Dairy farmers show they can deliver:

Federated Farmers commends its dairy farmers and Fonterra for the effort that has gone in to fencing off 20,400km of farm waterways.

“This is a great feat by our dairy farmers to help improve water quality, as around 90 percent of our dairy members are Fonterra farmers,” says Willy Leferink Federated Farmers Dairy Chairman.

“In two weeks time we are looking to have 24,400 km of waterways fenced off, which is half way around the world, if you count the second wire we’ve gone all the way. These are the first steps on a long and winding road to a positive and sustainable dairy future. . .

Speech to Executive Roundtable, Bangkok, Thailand – Nathan Guy:

It gives me great pleasure to speak to you today about global food security, and New Zealand’s journey to become a ‘kitchen of the world’.

Coming from a nation of 4.5 million people that feeds 40 million people around the world, I would like to offer a few insights on the topic.

New Zealand’s story

New Zealand has always been a farming and food producing nation. It is our passion, and part of our DNA.

The introduction of refrigeration in the 1880s meant we could export our meat and dairy products overseas, and for a long time we were known as the United Kingdom’s farm.

Things changed in 1973 however when the UK joined the European Economic Community, which meant losing our privileged market access.

This was a massive wake-up call for us as a nation, and forced us to diversify into new markets. It was the beginning of a major period of change. . .

Researchers get in behind working dogs – Sally Rae:

Dogs might be man’s best friend but on many New Zealand farms they are also often their best employees.

A research project has been launched to look at New Zealand working dogs’ health, welfare and survival.

The TeamMate project is being led by Dr Lori Linney, from Vetlife Alexandra, who will work alongside Dr Naomi Cogger, from the EpiCentre at Massey University, the largest veterinary epidemiology training and research centre in Australasia. . .

Hot air could control some weeds – researcher:

The Future Farming Centre in Lincoln is looking for funding to field test a non-chemical method of weed control, using heat.

The centre has adapted a Danish thermal system which uses steam to kill weed seeds in the soil, before crops are planted.

The centre’s head, Dr Charles Merfield, says using hot air instead instead of steam would be just as effective and use a lot less fuel. . .

te Pā is Pure Gold at 2013 Air New Zealand Wine Awards

A 2013 Sauvignon Blanc from the critically-acclaimed te Pā Wines has won a prestigious Pure Gold Medal in the Air New Zealand Wine Awards held on 12 November. The Pure category awards 100% sustainably grown and produced wines.

With grapes from te Pā vineyard in the historically significant Wairau Bar in the Marlborough region, the 2013 te Pā Sauvignon Blanc was noted for its vibrance and concentration by this year’s 26-strong expert judging panel.

te Pā Director and Proprietor Haysley MacDonald says: “To see our Sauvignon Blanc take out a top medal in New Zealand’s pre-eminent wine awards highlights the passion, innovation and expertise of our team and it also showcases the quality and sustainability of the wines we produce. . .


Rural round-up

November 15, 2013

 

Indonesia – islands of opportunity for New Zealand agriculture:

Indonesia is emerging as a market which needs large volumes of food and agricultural products to satisfy its fast-growing consumer demand. And New Zealand is well placed to capitalise on this demand and grow trade with Indonesia – a significant neighbour – according to new industry report.

In the report, ‘Indonesia – islands of opportunity’, global agricultural banking specialist Rabobank says the economic transformation underway in Indonesia – which is seeing the country emerge as an economic and political powerhouse in South-East Asia – is leading to rapidly-increasing demand for consumer goods, including food.

And with pressure on its natural resources limiting the country’s ability to boost local food production, Indonesia will continue its reliance on imported agricultural commodities. . .

One voice vital for infant formula industry:

New Zealand’s infant formula industry must speak with one voice if it is to achieve best practice and regain the faith of export markets, Infant Nutrition Council (INC) Chief Executive Jan Carey said in Dunedin today.

Ms Carey was speaking at the Global Food Safety Forum Meeting which was being held in New Zealand for the first time. 

She said achieving best practice in the industry depended on a number of vital ingredients. . .

Maximising the productive value of heifers:

Some heifers are calving at only 82% of their mature weight rather than the target of 90%, recent dairy industry statistics reveal.

With some farmers struggling to keep condition on stock during the drought last year, further support may be required to assist heifers to reach target weights.

SealesWinslow Nutritionist Wendy Morgan says that the strategic use of animal feed can assist heifers to reach their target weight by the time they calve, resulting in the animals being more profitable in the herd, using the nutrients and energy from pasture for production of milk solids, rather than for growth.  . . .

2013 New IPO Opens Dairy Sector to Retail Investor:

New Zealand’s leading dairy farm manager MyFarm today launched an initial public offer (IPO) of shares in the first new dairy farm investment to be immediately quoted on its new securities trading platform, MyFarm Trading.

The IPO of GCF Investments Limited will for the first time give New Zealand retail investors access to both a MyFarm syndicate investment, and a facility to trade that investment, overcoming one of the principal barriers to investment in the dairying sector. . .

Wolf Blass tops off outstanding year:

Wolf Blass tops off an outstanding year being named ‘International Winemaker of the Year’ at the 2013 International Wine and Spirit Competition.

Leading Australian winery, Wolf Blass, has been named International Winemaker of the Year at the 2013 International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC) in London overnight.

This is the third time that Wolf Blass has won this highly acclaimed award, the first being 1992 followed by 2002. . .

Remarkable success continues for Gibbston Valley School House Pinot Noir at the 2013 Air New Zealand Wine Awards

Multi award-winning Gibbston Valley Winery is celebrating once again after receiving its fourth consecutive Pure Gold Medal for its premium 2012 School House Pinot Noir at the Air New Zealand Wine Awards.

The results of this year’s awards were issued earlier this week (November 13 2013) by the New Zealand Winegrowers Association marking an unprecedented success for the winery. . .


Rural round-up

November 13, 2013

New Zealand’s Primary sector must not tolerate its weakest links

•        Industry must be prepared to remove those not prepared to meet baseline standards
•        Regulation needs to be balanced to avoid overburdening a strategic sector of the New Zealand economy

The global reputation of New Zealand’s primary sector lives or dies on every participant in the industry doing the right thing each and every day.  In a connected world it only takes one person to fail in fulfilling their duty to the environment, their animals or the community for significant pressure to come to bear on the whole sector’s license to operate.

The message that the industry can no longer tolerate weak links is a central theme in the latest volume of the KPMG Agribusiness Agenda 2013 which is released today. The fourth volume of the Agenda, titled “Balancing the needs of the environment, communities and businesses” discusses the issues associated with building a world class, sustainable primary sector in New Zealand. . .

Rollover protection on quads a lifesaver – researcher:

Associate Professor Charley Lamb, of Lincoln University’s Telford Division, has backed Whangarei coroner Brandt Shortland’s recommendation for more research to be done in New Zealand into the protection devices.

Mr Shortland’s recommendation follows the release this week of his findings into five quad-bike related deaths in which he says the vehicles are a farmer’s best friend, and also their worst enemy.

His recommendations include the compulsory wearing of helmets, more research on roll-bars and more training for riders.

On average, five people each year are killed in quad-bike accidents on farms and a further 850 are injured. . . .

Shock tactics and scars suggested for quad bike safety ads – Abby Brown:

Tweeting farmers say there needs to be an educational advertising campaign that uses shock tactics and even scars to warn of the hazards of using alcohol or drugs before using a quad bike.

Some farmers also said there needs to be more research on roll-over protection, speed limits need to be considered and most supported the call for the use of helmets.

Colin Grainger-Allen (@NZcows) tweeted that authorities like ACC need to use shock tactics to run educational advertising campaigns about the hazards of using quad bikes after drinking or drug use like they do with the anti-drink driving campaign. . .

Van der Heyden shares ideas with MIE – Alan Williams:

Former Fonterra chairman Sir Henry van der Heyden is playing down his role with red-meat lobby group Meat Industry Excellence (MIE).

“I’m sharing my ideas and experience from what I’ve learned in my time in the dairy industry with a large number of farmers and MIE is part of that,” van der Heyden said.

“Over the past two or three years many folk in the red-meat sectors have contacted me.”

It is understood van der Heyden has spoken at “invitation-only” MIE meetings with farmers over the past few months, ahead of director elections at the two biggest meat industry co-operatives, Silver Fern Farms and Alliance Group, at their annual meetings in December. . .

Leadership Reaffirmed for Grape and Wine Industry

New Zealand Winegrowers, the national organisation for the country’s 1,500 grape growers and winemakers, has announced the re-election of Steve Green as Chair and John Clarke as Deputy Chair for a second year.

Mr Green is proprietor of Carrick, a boutique Central Otago winery; he has been involved in the Central Otago grape and wine industry since 1994, has previously served as Chair of Central Otago Winegrowers and has been on the New Zealand Winegrowers Board since 2005.

Mr Clarke is a Gisborne grapegrower with over 30 years’ experience in the grape and wine industry. Mr Clarke, who is a former Gisborne Mayor, has previously served for ten years as the Chair of Gisborne Winegrowers and joined the New Zealand Winegrowers Board in 2006. . .

Wine & Tourism – a Winning Combination:

 2013 is turning out to be an outstanding year for Hawke’s Bay winery Sileni Estates. Off the back of recent local and international award success for their wines, Sileni Estates have recently been awarded the coveted Hawke’s Bay Cellar Door of the Year at the Hawke’s Bay A&P Wine Awards.

Cellar Door of the Year recipients in 2010 and 2012, Sileni Estates are surprised and delighted to receive the award again in 2013. Owner and CEO Graeme Avery comments, “We are thrilled that the Sileni Cellar Store has been awarded Cellar Door of the Year in three of the past four years. It is a credit to our dedicated and hardworking Cellar Store Team – Anne Boustead, Emily Lay and Simone Hartley; and to Sileni’s long term commitment to promote Hawke’s Bay and its wines.” . . .

Quality of wine shines through at Air New Zealand Wine Awards:

New Zealand wineries have again impressed judges at this year’s Air New Zealand Wine Awards with wines of outstanding quality making up the 111 gold medal winners.

Pinot Noir was the strongest performer, winning 22 gold medals, while 20 gold medals were awarded for Sauvignon Blanc and 17 for Chardonnay.

The aromatics classes, consisting of Gewürztraminer, Pinot Gris, Riesling, Viognier and Albariño, also shone in this year’s competition, bagging a total of 25 gold medals. The judges were impressed by the sparkling class, which was awarded 19 medals, including six gold.

Chair of Judges, Michael Brajkovich MW, said New Zealand winemakers are producing world-class wines across an exciting and diverse range of varieties. . .


Rural round-up

November 27, 2012

Hardy annual a cut above the rest – Peter Watson:

Tim McKergow isn’t getting much sleep at present.

He’s in the middle of the paeony harvest, a six-week sprint to pick and pack the prized flowers for export to the United States and Asia.

It means long days for his seven staff and even longer days for him deciding which flowers to send where for the best return and filling in an “awful lot of paperwork” to get them there.

The top out-of-season blooms sell for $US30 ($NZ36.37) a stem in upmarket Manhattan florists in New York, although by the time everyone else takes their cut he will only get about $2. . .

Rustlers caught in the act by Bay of Plenty farmer:

Federated Farmers is warning rustlers and poachers that eyes in the rural community are wide open for suspicious activity. Something rammed home to poachers after they were caught in the Bay of Plenty.

“Perhaps the big lesson I learned, is not to leave your mobile phone on the kitchen table,” says Rick Powdrell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson.

“As the matter is before the courts I cannot go into the precise details. That said, I was working late on the farm and spotted someone jumping the fence. You can say that got my attention. . .

Grasshopper Rock Central Otago Pinot Noir takes top spot at Air New Zealand Wine Awards:

A Central Otago Pinot Noir has won top honours at this year’s Air New Zealand Wine Awards.

The Grasshopper Rock Central Otago Earnscleugh Vineyard Pinot Noir 2010 was awarded the Air New Zealand Champion Wine of the Show Trophy at a gala dinner in Wellington on Saturday.

This marks the first ever win at the Air New Zealand Wine Awards for the Central Otago wine producer with judges describing the winning wine as “complex, round and rich”. The wine also won the JF Hillebrand New Zealand Ltd Champion Pinot Noir Trophy. Grasshopper Rock’s vineyard is situated in the southern-most latitude of the winegrowing areas in Central Otago. The five shareholding families of Grasshopper Rock originally met through a common interest in agriculture, with four members involved in rural banking. . .

Southland Hosts Environmental Leadership Forum for Dairy Farmers:

Taking a common sense approach to sustainable dairying is the theme of a sustainability forum for award-winning dairy farmers being held in Invercargill next week.

Forum chair, past-participant and Putaruru dairy farmer Martin Bennett says 54 participants at the Building Environmental Leaders Network Forum will be asked to share their thoughts on how the dairy industry shapes its response to sustainability challenges. . .

Biotech firm gets $2m boost – Hamish Rutherford:

Wellington angel investor Movac is pumping $2 million into Kahne, a biotechnology company trialling wireless devices placed inside dairy cows to provide farmers with health and fertility data.

Founded by Gisborne farmer Michael Eivers in 2002, Kahne was run on a shoestring before hiring former American investment banker Susanne Clay as its first fulltime chief executive last year.

Kahne has about 500 of its wireless rumen and vaginal sensors implanted in dairy cows and is conducting field trials, with the technology expected to launch commercially in about six months. . .

Villa Maria Estate captures big prize at NZI National Sustainable Business Network awards:

Auckland’s Villa Maria Estate has been named Sustainable Business of the Year at the NZI National Sustainable Business Network Awards announced last night (22 November).

The awards, which are now in their ninth year, are the pre-eminent sustainability awards in New Zealand. They recognise leaders in social innovation and businesses that are championing sustainability and new sustainable market solutions. The awards celebrate savvy organisations that are reshaping their business models for a more sustainable New Zealand. . .

And from Smile Project:


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