Rural round-up

27/08/2017

Deafening silence over water tax disappointing – Lyn Webster:

 As a small time dairy farmer in the far flung Far North I would possibly not be directly affected by the Labour Party’s proposed water tax. However since the idea was mooted, I feel physically and mentally badly affected by it.

It’s very strange indeed, I am actually finding this difficult to write as my feelings against the suggested policy and the potential ramifications of it are so abhorrent to me.

The deafening silence in the wake of Jacinda Adern’s proposal is also scaring me. There should be an outpouring of national outrage against the ideology of charging food producers taxes on natural inputs – whether the charges are called royalties, taxes or fees. . . 

Who will decide who will pay for water? – Ewan McGregor:

Charles Dickens’ Mr Micawber’s oft-quoted law defining the recipe for happiness states: “Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds, nineteen shillings and six pence, result happiness.

“Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds and six pence, result misery.”

The point is that the margin between happiness and misery is just a shilling. Such a small difference can have serious consequences to one’s spirit – and to the politics.

This is what has happened in this country, especially Hawke’s Bay, with water. Within a relatively short time available water (income) has moved from abundance, or at least the perception of such, (happiness), to scarcity (misery). . . 

Federated Farmers: chasing hard data on irrigation effects:

Based on their on-farm experience and observations, lots of farmers believe irrigation can boost soil carbon and soil water holding capacity.

Former South Canterbury Federated Farmers president Ivon Hurst is chairman of a research project that over the next three years will look to nail those understandings down with hard science and peer-reviewed data.

“Anecdotal evidence is not enough,” Ivon says. “It has to be scientifically validated and that’s the way forward for all future land management practices.”

Project research will be led by Landcare Research’s Dr Sam Carrick, and a range of extension activities led by Katherine McCusker, of the AgriBusiness Group. It will support improvements in the management of soils to reduce environmental impacts and enable more accurate estimation of nutrient loss. . . 

Dairy payout boosts Timaru’s $2.3 billion year – Elena McPhee:

Timaru District generated more than $2.3 billion as it continued its drive away from the brink of recession on the back of a more-than $150 million dairy payout, a new report reveals.

An economy that ended the year last year close to recession was firmly in growth in the second half of the year to June, the Infometrics quarterly economic monitor found.

Timaru’s economy stabilised in the June quarter and the provisional estimate of its gross domestic product suggested it was 1.3 per cent healthier than the year before. . .

On stressed out women: just hold on tight – Louise Giltrap:

A few months back, I was invited to join a newly formed group on Facebook.

It was formed in the hope that some of us within the dairy industry could get back to talking about what was important without feeling someone was waiting to judge us.

The other day a lady posted about getting to her breaking point during calving. The tears, the swearing, not getting the kids off to school on time and instead giving them the day off to avoid more angst and more chaos.

It opened the floodgates for a lot of us, including myself, to tell of our own falls from grace over the last week or so of calving. . .

Blue-sky thinking drives Tibet’s organic industries

(Xinhua) — “While one kilogram of ordinary peaches only sells for about 30 yuan (4.5 U.S.dollars), the peaches here might make 100 yuan each,” village official Sonam Yangkyi tells surprised visitors to Lhasa’s Pure Land Industry demonstration zone.

The reason for such a high price for the winter peach is simply that Tibet Autonomous Region’s high altitude and clean environment mean the peach is tastier and better than its competitors.

The winter peach is just one of the many varieties of fruit and other Pure Land Industry produce with premium quality and unique properties thanks to the pure water, soil and air there. . .

 


Rural round-up

02/10/2013

Fonterra Confirms Dispute Resolution Process with Danone:

Fonterra today confirmed that it is in a dispute resolution process with Danone following the whey protein concentrate precautionary recall initiated in August this year.

The discussions between Fonterra and Danone had been confidential with a view to reaching a mutually acceptable commercial outcome however some aspects of these discussions have been made public this morning in the press.

Fonterra confirms that the discussions remain ongoing but strongly denies any legal liability to Danone in relation to the recall.

Wool Expo Shows the Way to ‘Rest in Fleece’:

A coffin, handbags, pet rugs and digitally printed fabrics made from wool are among exhibits that feature in Wool Expo 2013 that takes to the road this month.

A partnership between the Campaign for Wool, PGG Wrightson Wool, and Massey University’s College of Creative Arts, the expo begins in Gisborne in two weeks and works it’s way down the east of the north island to end in Masterton in the middle of November.

Some revolutionary and innovative woollen concepts are explored, exhibited and demonstrated in the expo that will be based in PGG Wrightson’s retail stores in the six centres where the road show stops.

A coffin made of wool is featured. The idea isn’t new – back in the 1600s, in a bid to bolster Britain’s textile industry the British parliament passed a law requiring all corpses to be buried in a woollen shroud. Spin forward to 2009 when a prototype and sturdier wool coffin led to the present version. . .

Speech to the Primary Growth Partnership expo – Nathan Guy:

. . . Innovation has been a hallmark of our primary industries for well over a century.

To become a world leader, the sector has always made great use of science, technology – and innovation.

Just consider the dramatic shift in the way the sector produces, processes, markets and transports food products compared to even a few decades ago.

For example, we now produce the same amount of sheep meat today as we did in the early 1980s but with around half the number of sheep.

The global food market of the 21st century is changing rapidly and there are great opportunities for our food sector, particularly in Asia. . .

Martyn Dunne welcomed as new MPI Director-General:

Federated Farmers is pleased to welcome Martyn Dunne CNZM as the new Director-General of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

“Martyn Dunne brings a completely new dimension to the leadership of the MPI,” says Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers Vice-President.

“Mr Dunne brings a huge wealth of experience being New Zealand’s current High Commissioner in Canberra, the immediate past Comptroller of Customs and Chief Executive of the New Zealand Customs Service and before that, a Major-General in the New Zealand Army. . .

Federated Farmers builds talent with new appointments:

Federated Farmers policy resource is being built up by several new appointments including a new dedicated regional policy advisor to be based in its Invercargill office.

“Federated Farmers is serious about meeting the needs of our members and is investing is capability where it is needed,” says Conor English, Federated Farmers Chief Executive.

“We have excellent and well qualified staff and I am pleased to announce two new policy staff. . .

Farm with royal connections goes on the market:

A history-rich farm once visited by Prince Charles for a private day’s trout fishing has been placed on the market.

Macdonald’s Farm near Galatea in the Eastern Bay of Plenty is a sprawling 907 hectare sheep and beef breeding/finishing property. The Whirinaki River, which runs rich with rainbow and brown trout, is on the western boundary for the farm.

Prince Charles was flown into the farm during the royal family visit here in 1970 to celebrate the bicentennial discovery of New Zealand by Captain James Cook. . .

Synlait Milk supports AgResearch’s approach to campus development:

Canterbury milk nutrition company Synlait Milk is supportive of the investment by AgResearch in its campus infrastructure.

Synlait Milk Managing Director Dr John Penno says there is recognition of the growing importance of Canterbury as an agricultural powerhouse.

“Canterbury is New Zealand’s fastest growing milk supply region, with production growth at an average 11% per season for the last 12 seasons. We acknowledge the technical challenges this growth brings, in particular farmers ability to manage their environmental footprint. . .

New Zealand wine industry participates in national sustainability project:

The wine industry is the first to trial a new national environmental, economic and social performance Dashboard system.

Led by The Agribusiness Group Ltd and funded by government and industries, the $11 million New Zealand Sustainability Dashboard project will provide a sustainability assessment and reporting tool for the primary industry sectors.

The Dashboard project will deliver tools that provide farmers and growers with crucial information on the environmental, economic and social performance of their vineyards or farms.  Information from key performance indicators will be used to improve results in areas such as energy use, nitrogen loss, carbon footprint and maintenance of biodiversity. . .

Prestigious Awards Reflect Heritage for Johanneshof Cellars:

Another two Gold Medals and a Trophy for Johanneshof Cellars at the recent New Zealand International Wine Show held over the weekend, reinforces the opinion that this Boutique Winery is on a record breaking streak. Just six weeks ago Wine Makers Edel Everling and Warwick Foley were on the winners podium at the 2013 Spiegelau International Wine Competition, accepting four medals and 3 trophies, including joint ‘Champion Producer of the Show’.  This time the Johanneshof Cellars 2011 Noble Late Harvest Riesling and the 2012 Marlborough Gewürztraminer received Gold Medal honours with the Gewürztraminer being awarded overall Trophy.

How does this unique winery, nestled in a tiny valley on the outskirts of the seaport town of Picton on New Zealand’s South Island, continually have the spotlight shined on them? . . .

Prized Clayvin Vineyard signs lease with Giesen Wines:

One of the oldest and most prized vineyards in New Zealand, Clayvin Vineyard in Marlborough, has signed a long-term lease to Giesen Wines.

The coveted vineyard, which is more than 20 years old, covers 13.4ha in the sought after Wairau Valley, and has supplied grapes for a string of award-winning wines over the years. Developed in 1991, Clayvin was Marlborough’s first commercial hillside vineyard.

Wholly organic, the block comprises 7.8ha of Pinot Noir vines, 3.36ha of Chardonnay, 1ha of Syrah, and another hectare of younger Sauvignon Blanc vines that are not yet in production. . .

Cloudy Bay 2013 Sauvignon Blanc Released Worldwide Today:

The 2013 vintage of Cloudy Bay’s international benchmark wine is now available to fine wine lovers worldwide from today Tuesday October 1st. An outstanding summer with excellent growing conditions has enabled Cloudy Bay winemakers to craft New Zealand’s most precious summer flavours into their Sauvignon Blanc 2013 vintage.

Widely regarded as the quintessential expression of the acclaimed Marlborough wine region – which enjoys the longest hours of sunshine of any place in New Zealand, Cloudy Bay’s Sauvignon Blanc is noted for its vibrant aromatics, layers of pure fruit flavours and fine structure. . .


%d bloggers like this: