Rural round-up

15/02/2021

A tradition of love for the land – Sally Rae:

Maniototo farming families have headed for the hills each summer, moving their sheep into the mountains for summer grazing, in what is believed to now be a unique pilgrimage in New Zealand. This weekend, the Soldiers Syndicate is celebrating its centennial, as business and rural editor Sally Rae reports.

In the first year Phil Smith mustered on the Soldiers Syndicate, the mustering team got snowed in at Blue Duck hut in the remote Otago back country.

It was so cold the men’s hobnail boots froze to the floor and icicles hung around the old tin hut.

“I just thought to myself, what the hell are we doing?” the then 21-year-old recalled. . .

Call from uncle started decades of adventure – Sally Rae:

Tim Crutchley has a humorous explanation for why he keeps turning up for the Soldiers Syndicate musters.

“It’s a bit like working … on the wharf. If you don’t turn up, they all start talking about you. I’m a bit worried they’ll start running me down,” Mr Crutchley (63), who lives in Waikouaiti, quipped.

He would have notched up 40 musters last year — if Covid-19 had not interfered — and he reckoned he would probably keep returning as long as he was physically able to.

Despite being somewhat of a gypsy himself, and moving around, it was one place he kept going back to, and he was looking forward to the centennial celebrations and catching up with people he had not seen for a long time. . .

Kiwifruit growers’ PSA case: Government agrees to pay sector $40 million :

The government has agreed to pay $40 million to kiwifruit sector plaintiffs over the arrival of the vine killing disease PSA.

The disease arrived in New Zealand in 2010 and brought losses to the kiwifruit industry of an estimated $900 million.

Strathboss Kiwifruit Limited, representing a group of growers, and Seeka Limited, a post-harvest operator, and others, have agreed to accept a Crown offer of $40m, which includes a $15m contribution from the Crown’s insurers. The plaintiffs had brought a claim for $450m plus interest.

Legal challenges have been running since 2014, when the claimants filed against the Crown for what they alleged was actionable negligence in allowing PSA into the country. . . 

Banking on hemp becoming mainstream – Country Life:

A Canterbury hemp grower is swinging open his farm gates to showcase the crop.

Mainland Hemp’s Jamie Engelbrecht says people are learning of the plant’s potential but still have lots of questions so they are welcome to attend two upcoming field-day events.

Jamie was born and bred on a sheep and beef property in Waimate then studied farm management at Lincoln University.

The former rural bank manager has recently left his job at ASB to focus on the hemp growing and processing business he started with some Lincoln mates a couple years ago. . . 

Heat stress a priority during busy year for animal welfare work :

A significant amount of work is under way this year to update animal welfare codes and provide updated advice to farmers for issues such as heat stress, says the Ministry for Primary Industries.

MPI veterinarian and director for animal health and welfare Dr Chris Rodwell said early next month MPI, in collaboration with industry partners through the Farm to Processor Animal Welfare Forum, will review its work programme after recently completed shade and shelter research.

Dr Rodwell says that while mitigating heat stress in livestock is complex, MPI is confident that this pan-sector discussion will ensure a joined-up approach is taken.

“The industry has already been proactive on this issue and we are looking forward to keeping that momentum going in order to deliver the best welfare outcomes for outdoor livestock.” . . 

Buoyant year for primary sector with caveats:

New Zealand growers and farmers have kicked off the year with plenty of upbeat news, with strong commodity prices, relatively robust supply lines and continuing strong consumer demand for quality food putting farmers in a positive frame of mind as the new year starts.

The latest Federated Farmers farm confidence survey highlights just how positive farmers are, with a 34 point leap in confidence from last July, when farmers’ confidence was at its lowest in the survey’s 12 year history.

Bayleys national director rural Nick Hawken says the strong prices being received across the primary sector for red meat, milk, horticultural produce and wine is good not only for farmers’ returns, budgets, and frame of mind, but is also positive for the underlying productive value of their rural land investment. . . 

 


Rural round-up

31/01/2021

Changes coming for farmers, consumers – Hamish MacLean:

The Climate Change Commission will release on Monday its recommendations on our national response to our obligations under the Paris Agreement, specifically a plan to meet emissions-reduction targets. How we get our food and farming is likely to be in the spotlight. Hamish MacLean reports.

Livestock numbers in the lower South Island could come under the climate change spotlight as New Zealand starts to make the far-reaching changes it needs to to reach its carbon emissions goals.

New Zealand has kept the methane produced on farms, one of its biggest sources of greenhouse gases, out of its net-zero 2050 emissions target.

But when the Climate Change Commission releases its draft advice on Monday, future reductions in emissions from livestock digestion will be part of the discussion. . .

Final call for wool donations – Neal Wallace:

Crossbred wool may be lacking consumer interest and economic relevance for most sheep farmers, but it is underpinning two Southland charitable events.

The Bales4Blair project is using donated wool to insulate the Southland Charity Hospital being built in Invercargill and has one more week before donations close.

The Riverton Lions Club charity lamb shearing fundraiser held this week, with volunteers expected to shear 2300 lambs at the Woodlands AgResearch farm. . . 

Kaikōura wetlands: ‘100 years to destroy, another 100 to restore‘ – Anan Zaki:

Precious wetlands in Kaikōura that have been drained and degraded for generations, are now being lovingly restored and protected – in projects that landowners and farmers hope will inspire others to do the same.

Those behind the restoration work say changing attitudes among farmers are helping create more awareness about protecting natural habitat in farms.

Environment Canterbury (regional council), which is supporting the work, said although it will take decades for the wetlands to fully recover, there are already promising signs.

About five minutes’ drive from the Kaikōura township is the home of Barb Woods. . .

Fonterra joins with Royal DSM to lower carbon footprint:

Fonterra and Royal DSM, a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and sustainable living, are teaming up to work on reducing on-farm greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in New Zealand.

While the organisations have a long-standing working relationship, the new collaboration is based around DSM’s feed additive product Bovaer®, which effectively and consistently reduces methane emissions from cows by over 30 percent in non-pasture-based farming systems.

The question that needs answering now is: Can it do the same in New Zealand’s pasture-based farming systems? . . 

High sugar grass ranks as key profit driver :

Profit for some NZ dairy farmers set to increase through innovative ryegrass.

Dairy farmers in parts of New Zealand could generate hundreds of dollars of additional profit per hectare by sowing an innovative High Sugar Grass.

The 2021 DairyNZ Forage Value Index (FVI), released in January, identifies Germinal New Zealand’s AberGain AR1 High Sugar Grass as a leading five star cultivar for the South Island and lower North Island – making it one of the most profitable ryegrass varieties for dairy farmers in these regions. . .

Novel trait clarification could prove significant – Sean Pratt:

Health Canada plans to publish a new guidance document that could have a profound impact on crop breeding in this country, says an industry official.

The document will clarify what the government deems to be plants with novel traits, which are crops that are subject to regulation.

Seed companies hope the new definition will create a more predictable and transparent system for crop breeders.

“We’re encouraged to see that the government is taking this very seriously,” said Ian Affleck, vice-president of plant biotechnology with CropLife Canada. . . 


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