Rural round-up

October 31, 2018

How New Zealand dairy farmers are cleaning up their water: Aly Balsom:

Over the past five years, New Zealand dairy farmers have laid more than 26,000km of fencing to stop cattle from accessing waterways as part of an industry-led initiative to improve freshwater quality.

The industry’s recent push to tackle water pollution is part of a national drive to tackle declining water quality, which was identified by the government in its report Freshwater reform 2013 and beyond. . .

Nitrate fighter Eco-N might make comeback– Alan Williams:

Ravensdown hopes an international agreement could lead to a return of its Eco-N product to New Zealand pastures in autumn 2020.

Eco-N was lauded as the best way to prevent nitrate leeching in soils and the escape of nitrous oxide into the atmosphere from dairy farms but was taken off the market in 2013 after minute residues of the active component DCD were found in milk powder.

There’s now a chance world regulatory authorities, including NZ’s Ministry for Primary Industries, might be able to ratify an umbrella Codex agreement about the middle of next year to set rules for a maximum residual level for a range of benign compounds in food products. . . 

Dairy NZ appoints spin doctor Jo Coughlan to board– Gerard Hutching:

Dairy NZ is hoping to step up its communications spin with the appointment of Wellington public relations company owner and former local body politician Jo Coughlan as an independent director.

An industry observer said Dairy NZ’s failed challenge last year against Greenpeace to the Advertising Standards Authority over an advertisement attacking “dirty dairying” pointed to the need for better communication decisions.

At the time Dairy NZ chief executive Tim Mackle said Greenpeace’s attacks on dairy farmers amounted to scare-mongering, and were unfairly blaming dairying as the single polluter of rivers and drinking water in New Zealand. . . 

PGW chairman Lai quits:

PGG Wrightson Chairman Guanglin (Alan) Lai has quit as the firm’s chairman and from the board.

“I will always have great fondness for New Zealand and for PGW,” Lai said.

“The work that Agria has been able to do to benefit PGW and NZ is not yet finished but I think that my time in leading PGW as chair must come to an end as I need to focus on the next phase in my career and spend more time with my family. . . 

Dunedin Company Launches 100% Plant Based Mince:

Local Dunedin firm – The Craft Meat Company and its owners Grant and Sherie Howie, are launching “No Meat Mince.” The product will target Kiwis that want to reduce their meat consumption or who do not eat meat at all.

The recently developed plant-based mince uses ingredients such as mushrooms, tomato, almonds, coconut oil and soy protein. “We are seeing a significant rise in global demand for alternative proteins, and the New Zealand market is now experiencing a massive increase in Vegan and Flexitarian consumers” says Grant Howie. “Flexitarians are looking to replace some of the meat in their diet and so as a business we are responding to that new demand.” . . 

Skyline seeks feedback on Franz Josef Gondola project:

Skyline Enterprises is seeking feedback on its proposal for a gondola to be built at Franz Josef Glacier, as part of public consultation to the draft Westland Tai Poutini National Park Management Plan.

The Department of Conservation (DoC) has released its draft management plan for Westland Tai Poutini National Park, which sets out the proposed management regime for the area for the next 10 years. . . 

Pioneering vineyard on market in receivership sale:

The first vineyard and winery in New Zealand to be established purely for the production of the niche gewürztraminer grape variety has been placed on the market for sale through a receivership process.

Vinoptima Estate vineyard and winery at Ormond, some 26 kilometres north-west of Gisborne, was established in 2000 using five gewürztraminer clones planted in soils high in magnesium and boron. . . 

Top performing dairy farm placed on the market for sale:

A high-performing dairy farm with multiple accolades and certifications from milk production co-operative Fonterra has been placed on the market for sale.

The highly-productive 48.2-hectare farm located just south of Waiuku in the Counties region south of Auckland, milks 160 Friesian-cross cows – averaging 65,000 kilogrammes of milk solids per season.

The farm has been officially recognised numerous times over the past nine-years by Fonterra for the quality of its milk – including twice being ranked among the Top 40 dairy farms in New Zealand, and additionally being ranked among the Top 230 dairy farms in New Zealand on two other occasions. . . 


Rural round-up

October 18, 2018

Courses help women add value – Annette Scott:

Demand from women for new skills and confidence in their farming businesses shows no sign of abating with a national programme set to scale up for the third successive year.

Funded by the Red Meat Profit Partnership (RMPP) and delivered by the Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT), the Understanding Your Farming Business (UYFB) programme builds financial and communication skills that empower farming women to contribute more strongly to their businesses.

RMPP chairman Malcolm Bailey said the programme supports women in their role as critical farming partners by building on their business knowledge, skills and confidence. . .

Hard-working family on Greenvale farm since 1907 -Sally Rae:

Stud breeding is in the Paterson family’s blood.

Waikaka Station is home to the fourth and fifth generations to farm the Greenvale property — Laurie and Sharon Paterson and son and daughter-in-law Ross and Steph — while a sixth generation is looking promising.

Young Ollie (8) cannot wait to get on his motorbike while Emmie (6) is aiming to ride around the stock with her grandmother on horseback this summer.

Leo, the toddler of the family, has his boots on in the morning before his father, Ross quipped. . . .

Founder of stud mentioned in WW1 dispatches – Sally Rae:

Back in 1953, Matthew Kirkpatrick founded the Hereford stud that is now Waikaka Hereford.

One of Laurie Paterson’s earliest recollections of his grandfather was him driving an old, white, badly-dented Dodge car ‘‘rather like a tank’’.

‘‘So much so that one of the contractors always parked his car on top of the loading bank as he reckoned it was the only place safe from the boss.’’

Mr Kirkpatrick’s wartime experiences resulted in him being mentioned in dispatches for his work in the Imperial Camel Corps. . . 

Skills day and bark off planned by North King Country Young Farmers:

North King Country Young Farmers is on a mission to double its membership.

The active Te Kuiti-based club has a diverse member base of shepherds, dairy farmers and local rural professionals.

“Our aim is to help connect people and provide opportunities to socialise and upskill,” said member Christin Bentley. . .

Farmers play a pivotal role in fertility research success:

Dozens of scientists and more than 2000 farmers have been working together to improve cow fertility in New Zealand dairy cows. DairyNZ’s Jane Kay explains how this exciting four-year project is producing astounding results, with further studies planned in the future.

The North Island-based fertility project began in 2014, under the ‘Pillars of a New Dairy System’ DairyNZ-led research programme. This programme – funded from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), New Zealand dairy farmers (via their DairyNZ levy) and AgResearch – aims to provide management and genetic solutions to improve cow fertility and lifetime productivity. DairyNZ scientists Chris Burke and Susanne Meier headed the project, working with geneticists from New Zealand Animal Evaluation Limited (NZAEL), Livestock Improvement Corporation (LIC), CRV Ambreed and AbacusBio. In 2014, farmers provided 2500 cows, contract-mated to selected sires, to produce two groups of heifers with extreme differences in their fertility breeding values (Fert-BVs). . .

New Zealand Winemaker awarded World Pinot Noir trophy for the second year in a row:

New Zealand winemaker Andy Anderson has again beaten wines from the best in the world at London’s prestigious International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC) to take out the World’s Best Pinot Noir Trophy.

Anderson was awarded the world’s best Pinot Noir trophy for his 2014 Takapoto Central Otago Pinot Noir. The win continues a 12 year long winning streak for New Zealand taking out the IWSC World Pinot Noir trophy. . .

Labour shortages, hours of paperwork and uncertainty lead farmers to push for new ‘ag visa’

Fruit and vegetable growers say a lack of workers is keeping a lid on industry growth and leaving hundreds of tonnes of fruit at risk of being left on the ground every year.

Many are hoping a promised ‘agricultural visa’ for foreign farm workers will solve industry labour woes by allowing farms to hire a dedicated overseas workforce on a temporary basis.

In late August the National Party promised the visa would be delivered in “days, not weeks”, forcing senior Liberals to put the plan on ice saying it would cause diplomatic problems with governments in the Pacific. . .


Rural round-up

September 3, 2018

Beef + Lamb steps up farm plans push – Yvonne O’Hara:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (BLNZ) is ”on a mission” to continuously improve its Land and Environment Plan (LEP) programme as a key part of implementing its environment strategy, which was released in May.

Environment capability manager South Island Matt Harcombe said a survey of LEP workshop participants was carried out from October 2017 to March this year, and the findings would help improve the LEP resources and how they were delivered to farmers.

”We want to continue to build farmers’ confidence in the process of developing farm plans and understand how we can work with others to co-ordinate better support for farmers as well as encourage them to work together at a larger catchment-scale,” Mr Harcombe said. . . 

Getting behind New Zealand’s waterway restoration movement:

 This week is World Water Week and 3,000 decision-makers, scientists and experts from over 130 countries are converging on Stockholm, Sweden to develop plans to preserve this precious natural resource. In New Zealand, the health of our waterways is receiving similar levels of attention.

Our streams, lakes, wetlands and rivers have suffered over the last 150 years because of the effects of rural and urban development. While efforts to improve freshwater have mainly focussed on limit setting and development rules, we’re now seeing a rapidly growing grass-roots movement driving waterway restoration initiatives. These community efforts have developed because New Zealanders know the task of reversing the impacts is too big for a single owner or sector, so working together is the only way forward. . .

Change of dairy chairman for Federated Farmers – Ella Stokes:

If you have a passion about something get involved with it, says the newly appointed Federated Farmers Otago dairy chairman.

Dairy farmer Mathew Korteweg recently took up the role after previously being the sharemilker chairman for two years.

Mr Korteweg and wife Catherine, along with son Beau (1), have been 30% sharemilkers on Mr Korteweg’s family farm which has had a herd of 550 cows for the past five seasons.

For the past two seasons, they have taken on a neighbouring farm where they were contract-milking a herd of 550 cows. . . 

Synthetic wine and whisky soon to go on sale – Gerard Hutching:

First it was fake meat, cheese and milk. Now it’s pretend wine and whisky.

Forget about terroir, centuries old grape vines and peat-infused single malts from the famed island of Islay. San Francisco-based Ava Winery has shown it’s possible to create sauvignon wine and whisky in a laboratory.

At the Bragato wine conference in Wellington this week, winegrowers sniffed and sipped a molecular whisky and sauvignon blanc and handed out their verdicts. . . 

Why lamb is the most ethical meat to eat – Lizzie Rivera:

Forget Easter, now is the best time to eat British lamb, which is one of the most naturally reared animals, says Lizzie Rivera in the final instalment of our series investigating the myths and realities of meat production.

The importance of us knowing where our food really comes from has been highlighted by yet another food scandal, with the country’s largest supplier of supermarket chicken allegedly tampering with use-by dates.

This suggests it’s time for us to eat less meat or at the very least spread the load of our carnivorous diets by buying from smaller producers and varying our choices, perhaps even by rediscovering our love of lamb – and now couldn’t be a better time.

“The time to eat lamb at it’s absolute best – the highest quality eating, beautiful, flavoursome lamb – is in the autumn of the year. It’s just fantastic,” says Richard Smith, senior farms manager at Daylesford.

IFMA22 Congress opens $2500 bursary for ‘next gen’ farm managers – Johanna Baker-Dowdell:

Tasmania’s two major industries – agriculture and tourism – intersect at the next International Farm Management Association Congress.

Organisers are expecting a switched-on audience full of up to 400 farmers, educators, researchers, consultants, government staff and businesses, but they are particularly interested in the agricultural industry’s next generation.

The 2019 congress will be held at Launceston in March and the theme is Growing Agriculture @ 41 Degrees South. . .


Rural round-up

August 24, 2018

Water guru laments lost chances – Richard Rennie:

After half a century working with natural resources around the world and now in his career twilight Dr Terry Heiler despairs about New Zealand’s ability to develop a cohesive, sustainable water policy that supports irrigators, communities and the environment.

The irrigation pioneer and 2013 Lincoln Bledisloe Medal winner believes the problems around NZ’s irrigation funding are heightened in a global environment where hedge funds are seeking investment in a world requiring about $3.7 trillion a year in infrastructure investment.  . .

 

Milking It: taking calves from their mothers keeps the dairy industry going – Esther Taunton:

NZ is known for its dairy products, and is home to one of the biggest dairy companies in the world. In this Stuff special investigation, we examine how the price of milk is set and explore the industry behind our liquid asset.

It’s a practice often questioned by non-farmers but separating newborn calves from their mothers is better for the animals, a dairying leader says.

Janet Schultz, Federated Farmers Taranaki dairy chairwoman, said although taking calves from their mothers might appear cruel, it was necessary for the health of the animals and the industry.

Schultz said cows experienced the same discomfort as human mothers when their milk came in and a calf couldn’t drink enough to relieve the pain. . . 

Feeding cows seaweed cuts 99% of greenhouse gas emissions from their burps, research finds – Josh Gabbatiss:

Feeding seaweed to cows could slash the amount of climate change-inducing methane emissions from their burps.

Preliminary research has indicated a small amount of marine algae added to cattle food can reduce methane emissions from cattle gut microbes by as much as 99 per cent.

Now, scientists in California are hoping to help farmers meet strict new emissions targets by performing the first ever tests of seaweed feed in live dairy cows. . .

Continue to transform dairy field – Martin Wiedmann:

The dairy industry in New York and across the United States is at a crossroads. Even though cow’s milk remains one of the all-time best sources of dietary energy, protein and fat, people in the United States are drinking less of it. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Americans in 2016 consumed 154 pounds of fluid milk per capita year, down from 200 pounds or 25 percent just since the year 2000.

Along with a glut in milk production and trade uncertainty in global markets for dairy products, the lack of variability in dairy beverage offerings for consumers is placing New York dairy farmers under considerable financial and economic stress — and putting some out of business altogether. The state of New York has lost about 2,000 dairy farmers in the last decade alone, and more than 8,000 in the past 30 years. . .

Gates shut on daffodil viewing – Chris Tobin:

People once came in droves to admire the thousands of dancing daffodils at Pleasant Valley Daffodil Farm, just outside Geraldine, but it will not be happening this spring.

”We’ve decided not to open to the public now,” Gordon Coombes, who runs the daffodil farm with his wife, Cindy, said.

”By the same token, people’s lives have changed.

”When we started, most worked 40-hour weeks and weekends were free but people’s shopping and working lives have changed.

”The younger generation don’t have the same interest in gardening and they’re too busy. . .

Young Grower title goes back to the Bay:

After a lengthy battle, Danni van der Heijden was crowned Young Grower of the Year 2018 at an event in Napier last night.

Danni, 24, was named the winner after a day-long gauntlet of horticultural challenges, testing her skills and knowledge to the limits. As the regional Bay of Plenty champion, she beat out six other contestants for the title, and also secured the national title of Young Fruit Grower of the Year, along with finance, innovation, and speech awards.

First runner-up was Lisa Arnold from Hawke’s Bay, while third place went to Central Otago’s Hamish Darling. . . 

NZ Sommelier of the Year Competitions:

The New Zealand Sommelier of the Year 2018 has been won by Marek Przyborek of Huami Restaurant at Sky City.

The title was announced by Head Judge Cameron Douglas MS at the New Zealand Sommelier and Wine Professionals Awards Dinner earlier this week.

In a close-run competition, Andrea Martinisi from the Grove and Baduzzi Restaurants in Auckland and Maciej Zimny from Noble Rot in Wellington were runners-up. .


Rural round-up

August 7, 2018

Wool gets revived as tide turns on synthetics’ pollution of the seas – Heather Chalmers:

A new wave of socially and environmentally-conscious consumers are turning to natural fibres for their clothing and homes, rejecting polluting synthetics and plastics.  

New Zealand wool companies are already tapping into this trend, promoting wool as a natural, biodegradable and renewable replacement.

But while momentum is growing, returns remain stubbornly low for the coarser end of New Zealand wool clip.   

While shoppers may think they have done their bit for the environment by ditching plastic bags, they are being advised to look at what they are wearing and how their house is carpeted, furnished and insulated.  . . 

 Wrightson shares jump 9.4% on plans to sell seeds unit for $439M; may distribute cash – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Shares in PGG Wrightson jumped as much as 9.4 percent after the country’s largest rural services business said it had agreed to sell its seed and grain business to Danish cooperative DLF Seeds for $421 million in cash and $18 of debt repayment, and signalled it may return up to $292 million to its shareholders.

The sale is above the $285 million book value of the seeds business and follows several expressions of interest received from international parties as part of a strategic review underway with Credit Suisse (Australia) and First NZ Capital. The Christchurch-based company expects to have a net cash balance of about $270 million following the sale and could distribute as much as $292 million to shareholders. . . 

A2 doubles stake in Synlait at 23% discount – Sophie Boot:

A2 Milk will buy another 8.2 percent of Synlait Milk, doubling its stake in the company.

The milk marketing firm will buy the shares at $10.90 apiece, down 2.3 percent from the NZX one month volume weighted average price of $11.16, for a total of $161.8 million. The shares will come from Tokyo-listed Mitsui & Co, a general trading company which invests across sectors and bought 8.4 percent of Synlait at the company’s initial public offering in 2013. . .

 

New Zealand red meat sector strongly opposes European Union and United Kingdom’s WTO quota proposal;

Beef + Lamb New Zealand and the Meat Industry Association strongly oppose the European Union (EU) and United Kingdom’s (UK) proposal to ‘split’ the EU’s World Trade Organisation (WTO) Tariff Rate Quotas between them.

The UK and EU have officially notified the WTO of their draft tariff schedules, which propose to split tariff rate quotas that allow access for New Zealand sheepmeat and beef exports. . .

Trade outlook still bright, but not without challenges – Allan Barber:

Vangelis Vitalis, Deputy Secretary for trade at MFAT and chief negotiator for the CPTPP due to take effect early next year, gave a very thorough and enthralling presentation on the trade landscape to the Red Meat Sector Conference in Napier on Monday.

Free trade and market access are a key area of interest to the New Zealand meat industry and the economy as a whole. Vitalis stated that three assumptions underpin New Zealand’s international trade negotiations: . . 

MPI sets the record straight with Forest & Bird:

Ministry For Primary Industries 2 August 2018 MPI is disappointed that Forest and Bird thinks it necessary to make inaccurate claims about combined efforts to prevent the spread of Kauri dieback.

Forest and Bird has advised MPI that it is closing off its reserves with wild kauri as a further measure to prevent the spread of kauri dieback, says Roger Smith, Head of Biosecurity New Zealand (a part of MPI). “We welcome all efforts to protect our kauri and have been working in partnership with a wide range of organisations to support their local efforts. . .

Tour leader found with fruit fly:

Fruit fly larvae carried by a tour party leader could have devastated New Zealand’s horticulture industry, says Biosecurity New Zealand.

Biosecurity officers intercepted the larvae last month in undeclared food with a holiday group from Malaysia at Auckland Airport, says Biosecurity New Zealand Passenger Manager, Craig Hughes.

The larvae was found in chillies following x-ray screening of the tour leader’s baggage. A caterpillar was also detected in some garlic bulbs carried with the undeclared food. . .

Rabobank Wine Quarterly Q3 2018: Status Quo Under Pressure in US Route-to-Market

The US has emerged as the largest wine market in the world, and by most measures, the most profitable and attractive. While wineries – both foreign and domestic – recognise the profit potential of the market, it is also widely seen as an exceptionally-difficult market to penetrate (particularly for small wineries), according to the latest RaboResearch Wine Quarterly report.

Route to the US consumer

Major changes are occurring today in how wine reaches the US consumer. “Changes in technology, business models and market structure are disrupting the global wine market and creating new sets of winners and losers among wholesalers, retailers and suppliers,” according to Stephen Rannekleiv, RaboResearch Global Strategist – Beverages. “Responding quickly to these changes will determine who survives, who thrives, and who fades away.” . .

Boy, 10, raises $60,000 in ‘Fiver for a farmer’ campaign – Shelley Ferguson:

More than $60,000 has been raised for drought-stricken farmers through a campaign started by children at a Sydney school last week.

Jack Berne, a grade four student at St John the Baptist Catholic School in Freshwater, was the instigator of “a fiver for a farmer”, and was inspired to help after learning about the struggles of those on the land in class.

Last week, Jack wrote a letter to media outlets as he tried to generate support for the cause after telling his mum that their teacher always tells them, “we can use our small and mighty voices” ..  . 


Rural round-up

July 23, 2018

Sharemilkers vital, new section chairman says – Sally Rae:

A new farming leader believes sharemilkers are a vital part of New Zealand’s dairy industry.

Grant Tremewan has been elected as the North Otago Federated Farmers sharemilkers’ section chairman. He is passionate about sharemilking being retained as a viable pathway into farming and valued for its contribution.

”It’s the competitive advantage of the dairy industry, where much of its productivity and innovation comes from.

”I want to see sharemilkers treated fairly . .

Beingmate has muted Fonterra’s Chinese hum – Point of Order:

Fonterra is “humming” in China, according  to  a headline  in the  NZ  Herald,  although the  text  of the article beneath it mentioned  the  “woes”  associated with  the co-op’s investment  in Beingmate.

The  co-op  is having to absorb   an impairment of   $405m    on the value of its 18.8%  holding in Beingmate.  On top of the $183m payment it has had to make  French  giant  Danone, the  writedown  takes the gloss off that  otherwise  “humming”  performance.

Some of its farmer-shareholders may be looking over the  fence to  the rather different  outcome  for A2 Milk, which lifted its annual  sales  68% in the June year,  with  revenue   rising  from $549m in the June  2017 year  to  $922m.  During  the latest  year A2  Milk achieved gross margins  up  to  49%.   . .

Wallace Group extends Southland operations; achieves nationwide slink and casualty cow collection service:

Nationwide coproducts business Wallace Group today announced it had extended operations in Southland with the addition of a Mataura processing site, requiring around 20 seasonal contractors and 30 seasonal staff.

Wallace Group Chief Executive Officer, Graham Shortland says, “We’re very pleased to have extended our presence in Southland. The recycling of coproducts from the agricultural sector performs a valuable service for farmers and processors as well as protecting the natural environment from the impact of dead stock. . .

Otago/Southland named best Young Farmers’ region:

Otago/Southland has been named the country’s best NZ Young Farmers region.

The region’s members cheered excitedly when the award was announced in Invercargill.

“Our clubs are welcoming and well connected which ensures lots of interclub activities,” he said.

Marlborough wine – protecting and promoting the real deal:

A new initiative has been launched to safeguard Marlborough’s wine reputation and Lawson’s Dry Hills is among the first to jump on board.

The protection of ‘brand Marlborough’ has been under discussion for some years but with the proliferation of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc labels over recent times, a group of key industry people led by Ivan Sutherland of Dog Point Vineyards, have been spurred into action. . .

Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 announced:

Congratulations to Ben Richards from Indevin who became the Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 on Friday 13th July.

This is the second consecutive year Richards has competed in the National Final, however he was representing Hawke’s Bay in 2017 as he was working at Indevin’s vineyards there and finishing his degree at EIT. At the start of this year he was promoted to Viticultural Technician for Indevin and moved to Marlborough, so is delighted to represent his new region in this year’s National Final. , ,

Honey venture big winner at North Maori business awards:

The efforts of a 100 percent Maori-owned company specialising in manuka honey production have been recognised with two awards, including the coveted Taitokerau Maori Business of the Year award.

Kaitaia-based Tai Tokerau Honey was named overall winner, as well as securing the Northland Regional Council’s Excellence in Environmental Awareness and Management category, when the business awards were held in Whangarei recently. .


Rural round-up

July 15, 2018

Technology that allows coal ban a first for NZ dairy:

The engineers who were part of the ground-breaking decision to use electricity to power a dairy company’s major heat source say the decision showed courage and commitment.

In a first for Australasia, Synlait Milk is using an electrode boiler at its expanding plant at Dunsandel, south of Christchurch, choosing it over more traditional options including gas, diesel and biomass. Synlait had already rejected the use of coal on environmental grounds.

Babbage Consultants, the engineers who worked with Synlait to make the vision a reality, said electricity was the best option once the carbon footprint of the project was taken into account, and the electrode boilers they recommended were between 99.5 per cent and 99.9 per cent efficient. . . 

Do celebrity endorsements work for rural brands? – St John Craner:

Using the brand equity of someone else to prop up your own can signal a weak brand or a creative team who have run out of ideas. It seems if you have little brand credibility, you can simply purchase it. Or can you?

One of the more recent rural endorsements is Fonterra using Richie McCaw whose services are also employed by Westpac, Versatile Building, MasterCard, AIG and Air New Zealand. I could have missed others and some commentators suggest his dance card is full whilst farmer-shareholders I know felt that same money could have been better spent elsewhere. Whilst Fonterra’s Milk for Schools programme is a great initiative and one that should be applauded especially for those farmers who donate their milk freely, I believe the best ads Fonterra do are those that promote their own. . . 

Why milk, meat and eggs can make a big difference to the world’s most nutritionally vulnerable people – Silvio Alonso:

As the world becomes increasingly aware of the growing demands being made of our planet, more and more of us are making lifestyle choices to reduce our negative environmental impact and carbon footprint.

Understandably, this has led to calls for changes to our diets, including reducing the amount of livestock-derived foods, such as meat, milk and eggs, we consume.

However, a new, extensive review of research published h as found that these foods can make an important difference to nutritional well-being in the first 1,000 days of life, with life-long benefits, particularly in vulnerable communities in low-income countries . .

Ecuador and the world of bananas :

In Machala, south west Ecuador, the air is thick and hot, the road straight and as far as the eye can see are bananas.

Ecuador is the world’s biggest exporter of the yellow fruit, accounting for about 28.3% of global shipments in 2016, according to Pro-Ecuador (and an estimated 40% in 2017, according to FAO). Bananas make up 10% of Ecuador’s exports in value terms, according to Pro-Ecuador. In 2016 it exported 215 million tonnes of bananas, baby bananas and green bananas, worth US$ 110 million, mainly destined for Russia, the US, EU, Turkey and China.

Ecuador’s farmers are keen to expand, but government regulations restrict farm sizes. The industry has started a campaign to change this, so its farmers can grow and improve efficiency through economies of scale.

It has 5,000 growers, from small farmers to medium-sized growers and is organized through 300 co-operatives and 200 exporters, according to government trade body Pro-Ecuador. . .

Muddy Buns cleaning up the butter market:

Muddy Buns, Dirty Dirty Bread, or Zang Zang Bao as they’re known in China, are creating a social media frenzy and driving a further craving for butter around the world.

Fonterra Edgecumbe is all geared up to handle this global trend and is commissioning a new butter line which will nearly double the factory’s butter sheet production from 4,500 metric tonnes to 7,000 metric tonnes.

Fonterra General Manager Marketing, Global Foodservice, Susan Cassidy says “The Dirty Dirty Bread can best be described as a chocolate croissant. People love the flaky chocolate pastry that’s coated in rich chocolate ganache and sprinkled with cocoa powder. . .

South Dakota tractor taken by tornado found in Montana – Stephen Lee :

 Doug Davis finally found his tractor that had been swooped up by a tornado from his ranch in northwest South Dakota. Sort of.

“The tractor is mostly scattered in Montana,” he told the Capital Journal on Monday night.

The tornado came from the southwest on Thursday night, June 28, one of many that twisted their ways across Carter County, Montana, and Harding County, South Dakota. . . 

New Zealand Wine of the Year Awards 2018:

The best of New Zealand wine will be discovered at New Zealand Winegrowers’ refreshed wine competition later this year.

The New Zealand Wine of the Year™ Awards is the official national wine competition of the New Zealand wine industry, replacing the Air New Zealand Wine Awards and the Bragato Wine Awards, two of the industry’s major wine competitions.

The New Zealand Wine of the Year™ Awards will combine the very best components of the previous competitions, with a focus on rewarding the grape grower and their single vineyard wines (a core component of the Bragato Wine Awards), as well as championing New Zealand wine excellence on a larger scale (a key objective of the Air New Zealand Wine Awards). . . 


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