11.5c + 3-4c = more poverty

June 1, 2018

Petrol was $2.22 a litre when I filled up my car yesterday.

That’s expensive and it’s going to get worse:

Aucklanders will be hit with a 11.5c a litre rise as soon the regional fuel tax comes into effect on July 1, with petrol companies saying they will be passing the full increase on.

And there will be more pain when prices rise by as much as 4c a litre again on October 1 if the first round of three national fuel excise increases is implemented following a policy statement announcement at the end of June.

The Government has indicated the increase will be 3-4c every year for three years. . . 

A tax of 11.5 cents now and 3-4 cents in a few weeks will add up to more poverty.

Aucklanders might face the highest price increase but it will affect all of us one way or another because at least some of the price rise will spread throughout the country.

Every trip everyone makes in a petrol-fueled vehicle will cost more and so too will every trip everything everyone buys, and everything that goes into everything everyone buys.

The price rise might encourage some to forgo private transport for public, but public transport doesn’t serve everyone in cities and there are no passenger trains and local buses outside cities and you can’t put goods and services on trains and buses.

The price rises will fuel inflation which will put pressure on interest rates which will put more pressure on prices which will further fuel inflation . . .

And who will be hardest hit by that?

It’s always the poorest.

Auckland needs better roads but had mayor Phil Goff kept to his promise of finding 3-6 percent efficiencies across the Council budget, this tax would not be needed.

For the sake of us all, Aucklanders must come up with a viable alternative who could beat the incumbent at next year’s election to save us from another three years of tax and spend.

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366 days of gratitude

April 25, 2016

Many took the opportunity of today’s statutory holiday to have a long weekend away.

For those in and near our bigger cities that could mean hours in heavy traffic going and returning.

I drove 210 kilometres home this evening without having to pass a single other vehicle going the same way as me. Only one car came up behind and passed me and there would have been fewer than 50 vehicles which passed in the opposite direction.

Today I’m grateful I live in a part of the country which rarely has to endure traffic delays – and most of the few I encounter would be stock rather than vehicles.


366 days of gratitude

February 19, 2016

People who live in cities choose, or have, to use buses regularly and the drivers’ strike in Auckland was forecast to cause chaos however, commuters report ‘dream runs’ and lighter than usual traffic  thanks to many opting to walk or take alternative forms of transport.

What that says about repeated calls for more public transport and fewer cars is moot and dream runs and lighter traffic are relative.

I live about 20 kilometres from town. There are three give way signs on the route I usually take and nine times out of 10 there’s no traffic to which I have to yield.

Unless someone’s moving stock on the road or there’s a harvester or other heavy machinery using it, I can make the trip with no hold-ups.

Today I’m grateful I’m grateful I don’t have to deal with urban traffic and the associated stop-go driving regularly.

 

 

 


Council + community = progress

April 14, 2015

A challenge from Waitaki District mayor Gary Kircher has resulted in the main road in to Moeraki being rebuilt:

. . . Haven St has been closed to through traffic since August 2013 when a 350m to 400m section collapsed following heavy rain.

The road is being rebuilt as part of a push by the Moeraki community to reopen the road because of concerns about the width of the alternative route via Tenby St and that visitors were having problems finding their way to local restaurants and accommodation providers.

A group was formed to work with the Waitaki District Council and manage offers of help and material from local people to tackle the work under the supervision of an engineer and work on the road began in February.

Waitaki Mayor Gary Kircher said the rebuilt section of street was ”very impressive”. He was ”blown away” by what had been a ”fairly unique partnership” between the Waitaki District Council, the Moeraki community and local contractors.

”Numerous community members have done so well getting the road to this stage.”

He did not believe so much work had ever gone into the stretch of road, which had been notorious for slips for many years.

”Time will be the real test, of course. This work has been the chance to give it our very best effort. If this doesn’t succeed, I’m sure that nothing will, short of spending millions on it.”.

The project started as a challenge the mayor gave to the community at the meeting at the Moeraki Marae late last year.

”They more than met that challenge.”

An NZTA subsidy was not available for the road, and the district council offered to help pay if the community matched it in cash or in kind.

In the end the council would have spent about $60,000 of ratepayers’ money on the road.

He was keen to publicly acknowledge the huge impact the Moeraki community had made. . .

The popularity of the harbour,  Fleurs Place and the tavern leads to a lot of traffic on this road and the detour was less than optimal.

The rebuilding is a tribute to the people who accepted the mayor’s challenge.

This project could be a template for progress in other areas where there’s an opportunity for the council and community to work together.


Fuel price fall good as pay rise

January 7, 2015

A few weeks ago when I filled my car it cost nearly $120. I filled it last week for less than $100 and the price of fuel has fallen since then, and is predicted to fall more.

. . . Brent crude oil, the oil imported to New Zealand for petrol, was down US91c to US$56.42 a barrel on Friday on the back of continued concerns about a global supply glut.

Earlier in the day it had fallen to a post-2009 low of US$55.48, only half its average price of about US$110 a barrel between 2011 and 2013. . .

That reduction is as good as a pay rise or tax cut.

The benefit isn’t just the direct one of needing to spend less on fuel. There’s also the indirect benefit from a reduction in the cost of transporting goods.

Fuel is a significant cost on most farms and in many other businesses which will welcome the savings.

The government will get less in GST from fuel, but at least some of that will be offset by people spending money they would have spent on fuel on other things.

What does this mean for the theory of peak oil?

The price is a function of supply and demand and the lower price reflects a higher supply.


Where there’s a gap . . .

November 18, 2014

Last week news of Air New Zealand’s decision to pull out of some smaller domestic routes was met with the usual emotional response.

But already Sounds Air is looking at  flying some routes Air New Zealand will ditch and Tauranga-based Sunair Aviation is investigating starting flights to Kaitaia and Whakatane.

These airlines are only at the investigation stage but it shows where one business leaves a gap in the market, there can be an opportunity for another to fill it.


Whatever the weather

September 17, 2014

From Waitaki MP Jacqui Dean’s Facebook :

This morning I attended the opening of the Tasman Valley Road with Conservation Minister, Hon Dr Nick Smith. This significant upgrade was a collaboration of NZTA and DoC to improve safety and accessibility to one New Zealand’s most beautiful alpine regions. It will have great benefits for the surrounding communities.

Jacqui Dean MP's photo.

Jacqui Dean MP's photo.

This is #TeamKey working for New Zealand whatever the weather.

The announcement on the road says:

The completed $3 million upgrade of Tasman Valley Road at Aoraki/Mount Cook was officially opened today by Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith.

“The major upgrade of the Tasman Valley Road is about improving the safety and accessibility to New Zealand’s most spectacular alpine environment. This new road will enable over 100,000 visitors annually to enjoy the magnificent mountain, lake and glacial views of the Tasman Valley, and the unique flora and fauna including mountain lilies and daisies, and our unique mountain parrot, the kea,” Dr Smith says.

“The upgrade unveiled today – a partnership project between the Department of Conservation and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) – will improve one of New Zealand’s iconic ‘must-visit’ destinations, and provide significant benefits for the local tourism industry.

“The original road previously ran over a very dangerous and busy 2.2-kilometre bluff section, which has now been moved and realigned to run along the Tasman Valley floor, where it follows the contours of the nearby Blue Stream. This addresses a number of safety concerns associated with high traffic volumes on a narrow and winding section of road used by large buses and campervans. The new section also reduces the potential exposure to rock falls and avalanches.”

The capital costs of the upgrade have been shared by the Department and NZTA.

“This project is a great example of the Department working in partnership with other agencies to meet the aims of all involved. The upgraded road meets the strategic investment priorities for the Department with the area being an iconic site, while also meeting the NZTA’s priorities to make improvements where there are road safety issues and high traffic volumes,” Dr Smith says.

“I encourage many New Zealanders and other visitors to the area to make good use of this new road, and enjoy one of the great sights our country has to offer.”


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