How do Highlanders’ fans get north?

July 21, 2017

Floods have closed roads which would allow people on the right side of the Waitaki to go north:

. . .The NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) has closed State Highway 1 between Pukeuri, about 9km north of Oamaru, and Morven, South Canterbury. 

Journey manager Lee Wright said it was “a major event”.

“There are no safe detour routes off [SH1] because they are all significantly flooded as well. We’re really advising anyone travelling south of Christchurch to delay their journey.”

SH 79 between Fairlie and Geraldine, SH 77 between Ashburton and Methven, SH 83 between Pukeuri and Peebles, and SH 82 between Waimate and Kurow are also closed due to surface flooding. 

Wright had earlier urged motorists “to get home now”. . . 

Is this a plot between the weather and the Crusaders to stop Highlanders fans getting to Christchurch for the Super Rugby quarter final tomorrow?

How will the Highlanders fans get north?


We don’t sing as one

July 8, 2017

The Welsh have been singing at rugby games for generations.

Australians took to singing Waltzing Matilda  more recently.

Why don’t New Zealanders sing?

When we were in Argentina to watch the Pumas play their first home game in the Rugby Championship against the All blacks four years ago, the group practised singing before the game but once we got to the stadium any attempts to get a rousing song going petered out.

The Rugby Union has been using social media to get garner enthusiasm for Tutira Mai 

It means stand as one but it hasn’t got us singing as one.

It’s been shared and liked on Facebook by thousands of people but has failed to get traction at the tests.

Lions fans have been louder, and possibly more numerous than the locals.

Maybe many of the people who go to rugby matches aren’t the people on social media.

And playing Tutira Mai through the speakers isn’t enough to get the crowd singing. As we found in Argentina, that requires strong singers in the crowd.

I like the song, even though Ngatai Huata, the daughter of Canon Wi Te Tau Huata, who composed it, says we’ve got the words and tune wrong but I won’t be at the test and even if I was, I’m definitely not the one to get a crowd  to sing as one.

However, singing or not, I will be backing black and my prediction – based on the fact the team will want a win for captain Kieran Read’s 100th test and they will also be focussed on continuing the unbroken steak of series wins against the Lions – is a win to the All Blacks by um, 21-13.

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NZ’s Cup again

June 27, 2017

Yahoo!

Twenty two year’s after Peter Montgomery celebrated New Zealand’s first America’s Cup win with the words, The America’s Cup is now New Zealand’s Cup,  Emirates Team New Zealand has won the 35th America’s Cup.

The Kiwi team dominated the final stage of the 35th America’s Cup, winning eight races to ORACLE TEAM USA’s one race win, giving the New Zealanders a final winning scoreline of 7-1.

They won eight races but the score line of 7-1 reflects the defender’s rule change to make the challengers start with -1.

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P.S.

Peter Burling is only 26 – the youngest helmsman to win the America’s Cup.

 

 


Match point

June 26, 2017

The America’s Cup website says Super Sunday belongs to Burling and Emirates Team New Zealand:

It is now Match point Emirates Team New Zealand.

Day four of the America’s Cup Match, presented by Louis Vuitton, belonged firmly to Peter Burling and the New Zealand team who comfortably won the two scheduled races of the day, races seven and eight of the final stage of the 35th America’s Cup.

Burling and his crew have already won eight races but the rules, set by the defender, meant the challenger started at -1. This gives Team NZ a moral victory already. But rules are rules and they require one more win to take the cup.

Having won race six on Saturday, ORACLE TEAM USA went into the second Sunday of the America’s Cup Match, presented by Louis Vuitton, looking to gain more ground on their Kiwi rivals, but the New Zealand juggernaut had found its pace again and was unbeatable in similar weather conditions to day three, . . 

We can’t forget what happened in San Francisco when Team NZ went from match point to loss, but we didn’t have the Bermulanders on our side then.

Whoever, wins the cup, I’m giving the advertising prize to Toyota for these social media slides:

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Bermulanders backing Team NZ

June 25, 2017

My parents might not have met had my father not been a sailor.

He capsized his yacht one day and was picked up by a man whose wife was a nurse who arranged a blind date for the rescued yachtie and a nursing friend who became my mother.

My brothers inherited Dad’s love of sailing but my love of the sea is for swimming in rather than sailing on.

Not being a sailor hasn’t stopped me marvelling at the design and performance of the Americas Cup yachts and the skill of the crews.

Though my excitement over the strong start Team NZ made was tempered with the memory of the way an apparently unassailable lead turned into a loss in the last challenge.

Today’s results – one win to NZ, one to the USA, adds to the tension.

But last time we didn’t have the Bermulanders on our side.


Dave Finlay QSM

June 5, 2017

Dave Finlay has received recognition for his decades of service to irrigation, agriculture, sport and the community.

Mr David Finlay has played a key role in organising the irrigation of farmland in the Lower Waitaki region.

Mr Finlay has served for 41 consecutive years on the committee of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation scheme and the Board of the Lower Waitaki irrigation company, a scheme that irrigates more than 19,000 hectares of farmland.

In the 1990s he was a key player in the Irrigation North Otago group that developed an irrigation solution for the hills and downlands of North Otago. His contributions to irrigation have transformed the region and he has overseen the developments from inception through to completion.

In 1976 he was a founding member of the Lower Waitaki Golf Club and served as the Club President for four years. He is an active member of the St Kevin’s College Foundation and is involved with leading meetings, raising funds and recruiting new members.

He was a member of North Otago Federated Farmers and served a two year term as the Meat and Wool Chairman, representing the region in Wellington.

Mr Finlay has also held several coaching and administrative roles for North Otago Rugby and his efforts have encouraged schoolchildren to take up the sport.

Dave’s enthusiasm and dedication are legendary, he has more than earned this recognition for his service.

The ODT covers Dave’s QSM and other Southern recipients of honours here.


Rural round-up

March 7, 2017

Telling NZ’s red meat story globally:

New Zealand’s red meat sector has “taken another step” towards  positioning its beef and lamb as a premium food choice globally, Beef + Lamb New Zealand chief executive Sam McIvor says.

More than 70 people including farmers, meat exporters and government partners have been meeting to advance the project with the aim of supporting better sector profitability.

The story of New Zealand farming and its farmers is at the heart of Beef + Lamb’s new market development strategy targeting new and emerging markets.

The sector had been working together for 12 months, designing a new market development plan and the first piece of it was defining the sector’s story, Mr McIvor said. . . 

New Pareora venison plant a major boost to South Canterbury economy – Pat Deavoll:

The Silver Fern Farms (SFF) Pareora freezing works can now offer its skilled employees full-time work across 52 weeks, rather than the seasonal work of the past, as a result of a new $7 million venison processing plant.

Seventy staff, shareholders and executives gathered at Pareora, south of Timaru, on Tuesday for the official opening of the plant, which processed its first animal on November 14 last year.

The new plant had been built to replace the meat co-operative’s Islington plant, which was on leased land and part of a business park at Belfast, Christchurch. . .

Velvetleaf-sniffing dog Rusty finds weed pest in Waikato no problem – Gerald Piddock:

With a sniff of the air and nose to the ground, Rusty has his prize within minutes.

The seven-year-old border collie cross turns back to his handler, John Taylor and barks, letting him know he has found another velvetleaf plant.

He then leads Taylor to the plant’s location in the ryegrass paddock on a farm in eastern Waikato. The invasive species is carefully uprooted and bagged for disposal.

Palmerston North hosts Rural Games this weekend – Jill Galloway:

Throwing arms are being warmed up for the Hilux Rural Games, which are being held in Feilding on Friday and Palmerston North during the weekend.

Among the competition disciplines are gumboot, egg and cowpat throwing with the criteria harder for the egg thrower as one member of a two-person team has to catch the raw egg intact.

Also on the line-up will be wood chopping, speed shearing, dog trialling and fencing. . . 

 

Zespri brand turns 20, as industry aims to more than double sales to $4.5 billion by 2025:

This week marks a milestone with the kiwifruit industry coming together to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Zespri brand, proudly owned by New Zealand kiwifruit growers.

Zespri chief executive Lain Jager says the celebrations come at a great time, with the industry aiming to more than double sales to $4.5 billion a year by 2025.

“Kiwifruit is an important economic contributor to communities in regional New Zealand, with more than $1.14 billion returned to NZ communities last year alone. More than $21 billion of premium kiwifruit has been sold in a Zespri box since 1997; our brand is underpinned by the great work done over many years right across the industry from orchards to packhouses and in the markets,” says Mr Jager. . . 

Public warned of fines up to $20,000 for collecting toheroa at 90 Mile Beach:

Fisheries officers are appealing to the public to ensure they’re up to speed with the rules around collecting toheroa, now that the rare shellfish are making a comeback to 90 Mile Beach (Northland).

Ministry for Primary Industries spokesman, Steve Rudsdale, says the beach has been empty of toheroa for many years and it is great to see juvenile toheroa making a comeback and beginning to recover.

However, he says their survival will be threatened if people don’t leave them alone.

“There is a ban on collecting these shellfish for a very good reason.  . . 

Dairy awards southern finalists named:

Finalists have been named for Southland-Otago and Canterbury-North Otago in the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards.

The awards, which oversee the Share Farmer of the Year, Dairy Manager of the Year and Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions, received 424 entries nationally, 75 of them coming from those regions.

The Canterbury-North Otago regional winners will be named on March 22 and the Southland-Otago ones on March 25.

They will then progress to the national final. The winners will be announced at a function at Sky City in Auckland on May 6. . . 


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