MoP sets new rules for equality

April 1, 2018

The Ministry of People (MoP) has issued new rules for equality.

People Minister Julie Strictly-Gentle said she had been concerned for sometime that the movement for equality had all been one-sided.

”Everyone has been focused on getting young people of the female and/or ethnic kind into top executive and governance roles. No-one has even considered the importance of ensuring there are plenty of old white men in non-traditional roles,” she said.

“It distresses me that almost everyone accepts an old white man at a sitting at a board table. We won’t have true equality until it’s just as acceptable to have him on his hands and knees scraping play dough off the floor.”

“Previous Ministers have focused on only half the job, trying to help young women of many cultures into the board room with their hands on the levers of power. I see it just as important to help old white men into eco-friendly rubber gloves with their hands in the nappy bucket.

Consultation on the new rules will finish at midday today.

Advertisements

Rural round-up

December 10, 2017

Liam Hehir DESTROYS a neoliberal farmer – Liam Hehir:

When I went out to see my parents the other night, Dad looked pretty worried. Every now and then I would catch him looking out the window at the sea of yellowing grass on our little dairy farm. “It’s going to be one of the worst droughts in decades,” he said absentmindedly.

My patience wore thin. “You usually vote for National, right?” I asked. Dad said nothing in silent confirmation.

I adopted my most scolding voice.

“You farmers have a lot of nerve being upset about this. You lot are always voting National. But National is the party that allowed water bottling companies to dig up our water and ship it overseas. Surprise, surprise, we’ve run out – it’s all in other countries! Now you have the temerity to wince and try to guilt us over the great summer we’re enjoying?” . . 

James and Bridget’s farm:

From the farmers:

Hi, we’re James and Bridget and we run Quambatook farm near Oamaru. The Aboriginal name of Quambatook means ‘place of rest’. We are fifth generation farmers in partnership with James’ parents Ray and Kathrin McNally.

We converted to dairy ten years ago and currently milk 800 cows increasing to 900 in the 18/19 season. We have three children, Charlotte (5), Jimmy (3) and Olivia (1). They all love getting out and about on the farm and helping.

Our main purpose is to be environmental stewards for the next generation and dairy farming is providing us with a pathway to succession.  We would love to have people come and visit our farm to inform and educate them about how a sustainable dairy business works and show them how much we care about our environment. . . 

Open Gates day a chance for farmers to show they care about the environment – Gerald Piddock:

Wynn Brown hopes opening the gates of his dairy farm will put a human face on an industry that increasingly is offside with the public.

The Matamata dairy farmer is one of eight farmers around Waikato and 40 around the country taking part in Fonterra’s Open Gates day on Sunday, December 10.

The industry “had taken a fair bit of a beating” over the last six months and he hoped the day would go some way to changing that.

“My hope is that it bridges the gap between urban and rural and that urban people can see that we are trying hard to do the right thing.” . . 

Meat company choice clearer than it’s every been – Allan Barber:

November used to be the month when we could get a comprehensive idea of the financial state of the meat industry because annual results were published in quick succession by three of the major processors: Alliance, Silver Fern Farms and AFFCO. When AFFCO was absorbed as a wholly owned subsidiary of Talley’s, there were still the two cooperatives to provide a comparison, but now SFF’s balance date is 31st December. So we must now wait until March to find out about ANZCO and SFF. This means Alliance’s result is the only one which can give a factual record of the traditional meat year, while it is still reasonably fresh in the mind.

Therefore the headline numbers – turnover up 13%, $20.2 million operating profit (2016 $10.1 m), $11.4 million pool distributions ($9.8 m) and 71% equity (70.6%) – make encouraging, if not exactly overwhelming, reading and suggest Alliance has turned a corner after last year’s near breakeven performance, while also indicating a better trading environment for the industry as a whole. This has also occurred against the backdrop of improved returns for sheep and beef farmers. That said, last season was easier for sheep meat dominant processors than for those with larger beef businesses because of the respective climate effects on livestock flows. . . 

Mouldy fed threatens animal health – Pam Tipa:

Mycotoxins threaten animal health and producer profits, so identifying and addressing these hidden challenges is important for farmers.

The Alltech 37+ test now identifies five extra mycotoxins that can threaten animal health and producer profitability.

The testing is available to New Zealand farmers, but it is done in Ireland, an Alltech NZ representative says. At least 140 samples have been sent from NZ with interesting results. . .

‘Choose Black’ wins gold:

A campaign to market mastitis treatments to dairy farmers has been recognised at the Westpac Waikato Business Awards.

The Choose Black marketing campaign was developed to showcase Virbac New Zealand’s locally made mastitis treatments.

At the start of the 2016-17 season Virbac targeted the lactating cow intramammary market where rival products had been used for many years. . .


Tax teachers to tackle tail of failures?

September 19, 2017

Why don’t we tax teachers and use the money to tackle the tail of kids who fail at school?

That wouldn’t be fair, there are many reasons for children failing, you can’t hold all teachers responsible.

There are many reasons for the degradation of water quality, but you say it’s fair to tax all irrigators to clean it up. You could use the money for professional development for teachers who aren’t performing.

That’s ridiculous, you couldn’t take money from good teachers to upskill the bad. it’s not their responsibility, that’s up to principals or the ministry.

But Labour plans to take money from all irrigators and use some to bring poor performers up to standard even though regional councils already have the powers to make them comply.

And what about the teachers who are already doing everything they should, and spending their own money on further education. You can’t expect them to pay for those who don’t.

That’s exactly what Labour’s water tax would do. It would take money from irrigators who have spent and still are spending their own money to bring those who haven’t and aren’t up to scratch.

But what if the school doesn’t have a problem with pupils not achieving, what if it and it’s teachers are already doing everything they can for all their pupils?

The money could go to schools where there are problems.

But that’s not fair, you can’t tax teachers at one school and use the money to deal with problems at another.

That’s exactly the way the water tax would work. It would take money from the good in one place and use it to deal with problems in another.

But what if teacher standards aren’t the problem anyway? You can’t tax them for something over which they have no control.

That’s exactly how the water tax would work. It would take the money even if the problem with water quality was due to bird life, storm water or sewerage and nothing at all to do with irrigating or even farming.

And what exactly would the money be used for, how would it make a difference? You have to have a plan first then work out how to pay for it, not take the money and then find ways to spend it.

That’s exactly what’s been suggested for the water tax. Labour has said it would take the money, give some to Iwi, some to regional councils to clean up waterways, but with no plan for how they’d do that, and if any is left over it could be used for roads which are district council responsibilities. All of that’s very vague and nothing they’ve said explains how the money will make a difference to waterways.

Teachers always get the blame but you can’t make them pay because children are behind before they get to school, don’t have basic language, are hungry, have health problems . . .

Just like farmers get the blame for poor water quality when it isn’t them or their farming practices which are the problem.

It would simply be unfair to tax a whole group of professionals, with a vague intention to use the money to solve problems for which most aren’t responsible and over which they have little or no control and no concrete plan over how it could make a difference.

Exactly.

 

 

 

 


Will they, won’t they

July 14, 2017

Labour NZ First Green Quadrille

(With apologies to Lewis Carroll).

 

“Will we give our vote to Labour? said a Green MP, one day

“NZ First keeps polling well but won’t usually vote our way.

“See how eagerly the media and the pundits rate the chance

“That we we’ll forget our principles and with Winston join the dance.

“Will we, won’t we, will we won’t we,

“Will we join the dance?

“Will we, won’t we, will we, won’t we,

“Will we join the dance?”

 

“You can really have no notion how delightful it would be

“If the voters up and voted for us to run the whole country.

“But NZ First and Labour, our programme won’t advance

“So I’m really not convinced we’ll want to join their dance.

“We will thank the votes kindly, but we would not join the dance

“Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not join the dance.

“Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not join the dance.”

 

“What matters if  we pull the plug and Labour couldn’t rule?

“It would cost, but what the heck, we’d still be feeling cool.

“With every poll the pundits show we haven’t got a chance

“Of making it to cabinet and therefore don’t want to join the dance.

“Will we, won’t we, will we, won’t we, will we join the dance?

Will we, won’t we, will we, won’t we, won’t we join the dance?”


Clocks forward permanently

April 1, 2017

The scheduled return to standard New Zealand time tomorrow morning has been cancelled and clocks will stay one-hour ahead permanently.

A spokesman for the Department of Infernal Affairs, Ms Sunny Disposition said that putting clocks back signalled the start of winter to many people and since summer weather had been so disappointing, few if any were ready for it.

“Most people agree daylight saving is good and if some is good then ipso facto more must be better,” she said.

“We can’t change the weather, but we can keep the clocks forward and allow people more daylight. The sun comes out in the day and after the sorry excuse for summer over much of the country that’s what we need to cheer us all up – more day and less night.

“We’ll all get more vitamin D and save power with less need for electric lights.”

A reporter who pointed out that whether or not clocks stayed forward an hour, there would be less daylight as the sun moved north, was told that wasn’t in the Department’s brief.

“Clocks and time are our preserve, if you have a question about the sun you’d be better talking to Met Service or NIWA,” Miss Disposition said.

“I understand someone from one or other of them will be available to talk around mid day.”

 

 


Why men shouldn’t vote

September 19, 2016

It’s the 123rd anniversary of New Zealand women gaining the right to vote.

Apropos of this, Alice Duer Miller wrote in 1915:

Why we oppose votes for men:

1: Because man’s place is in the army.

2. Because no  really manly man  wants to settle any question otherwise than by fighting about it.

3. Because if men should adopt peaceable methods women will no longer look up to the,.

4. Because men will lose their charms if they step out of the natural sphere and interest themselves in other matters than feats of arms, uniforms and drums.

5. Because men are too emotional to vote. Their conduct in baseball games and political conventions shows this, while their innate tendency to appeal to force renders them particularly unfit for the task of government.


The spousing crisis

July 7, 2016

Behind the humour is the sorry truth of an unfortunate aspect of modern life:

The spousing crisis is leading to homelessness and child poverty.

Rental spouses are just too expensive.They are insecure and impermanent. You could get kicked out at any time and have to go looking for another. Some spouses have become P-contaminated and put children at risk. But there simply aren’t enough solid, life-time spouses available, so more and more people are being forced into the rental spouse market. . . 

Read the rest at Lindsay Mitchell.


%d bloggers like this: