Olduvai Gorge Thorn Tree

February 27, 2011

Discussion on Arts on Sunday between Lynn Freeman and poets Mary McCallum and Jeffrey Papmoa Holman reminded me I hadn’t done my usual post on Tuesday poem.

This week’s feature poem is Olduvai Gorge Thorn Tree by Sarah Lindsay.

Among the links in the sidebar is prose and poetry about or related to the Christchurch earthquake.

InRebuilding Christchurch one sandcastle at a time – Catherine Fitchett posts photos of her daughter’s creative response to the silt.

Helen Lowe has earthquake update and earthquake recovery day 3, day 4 and day 5

Renee Liang writes of the weed mat of humanity.

Helen Rickerby writes on the earthquake.

Belinda Hollyer writes the city of ruins will rise again.

In my city of ruins/tales of Canterbury Tim Jones writes:

. . . In an attempt to do something, anything, to make a difference, we are putting together an anthology of short stories loosely themed around survival, hope and the future. All profits of this anthology will be donated to the Red Cross Earthquake Appeal, or another registered charity aimed at aiding those in need in Canterbury.

The purpose of this Anthology is two-fold—to help financially, but also, we hope, to provide entertainment and alleviation in a time of crisis. We hope that our words will help make a difference. . .

In earthquake – the words, Mary McCallum posts Earth, the poem she wrote after the September 4 quake.

UPDATE: Lou at No Minister has a photo of Olduvai Gorge, the setting for the feature poem.


Poem for a Hard Time

February 15, 2011

Canadian poet Lorna Crozier’s Poem for a Hard Time is this week’s Tuesday Poem.

Among the poems linked in the side bar are:

She Who Is Like The Moon by James K Baxter

In/Let by Jo Thorpe

Big Stupid Grin by Andrew Bell

Ode to Things by Pablo Neruda

Gypsy Girl by Alicia Ponder

Knowing by Helen Lowe

Old People Love  by Susan Landry

Roses by Sue Wootton

Bus Stop by Harvey Malloy


Poets

February 9, 2011

Poets by Janet Frame is this Tuesday’s Poem.

Among other Tuesday poems linked in the side bar are:

Taupiri by Robert Sullivan.

Bipolar Opposites Detract by Andrew Bell.

The Way Through The Woods by Rudyard Kipling.

Dating by Mary McCallum.

The Weather Cock Points South by Amy Lowell.


The Homely Ghost

February 5, 2011

This Tuesday’s poem is The H0mely Ghost by Marjory Nicholls.

Among other Tuesday poems linked in the sidebar are:

The geometry of water by Susan Landry

My Father by Andrew Bell which includes these lines:

At all the painful pinnacles of growing
my father was there like a crampon you know will not fail you. . .
That is a stunning simile and a wonderful tribute.

The Physiotherapist’s Piano

January 27, 2011

This Tuesday’s poem is The Physiotherapist’s Piano by Jenny Powell.

Other Tuesday Poems linked in the sidebar include:

Robert Burn’s poem O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast chosen by Kathleen Jones who includes a link to a reading of the poem.

Liberty by Edward Thomas.

Growing is Forever by Karlie Markle – an audio visual celebration of nature.

Broken Arm by Emma Barnes.

The Picnic by Sarah Jane Barnett.

Blackberry Picking written and read by Seamus Heaney.

Will You Dance with Me by Renee Liang.

Haiku “spring rain” by Kobayashi Issa.

Poetry is Fun by Susan Landry.

I Saw A J0lly Hunter by Charles Causley.

Clarity by Mary McCallum.

There are more – if you click on the first link you can find the rest yourself.

Love in the Early Winter by Jenny Powell.


Last Rescued Bird

January 19, 2011

This Tuesday’s poem is Last rescued Bird by T. Clear.

Other Tuesday poems include:

Young Woman Marries the Farmer’s Son by Marisa Capetta

Helen Rickerby’s Partying with Katherine Mansfield

Mopani Worms by Clare Beynon

Black Dog by Sarah-Jane Barnett

Question by May Swenson

The Butcher by Elizabeth Welsh

Headache by Amy Brown

Here’s to a Little Rebirth by Eileen D. Moeller

Blessing by Greg O’Connell

After Reading Auden by Mary McCallum 

Ripple by Helen Heath

From the Inuit by Susan Landry

Lament for Lost Literary Comfort by Andrew Bell

Putting In The Seed by Robert Frost

I Like My Own Poems by Jack Grapes

You Do Not Need Many Things  by Taigu Ryōkan

Time and Materials by Robert Hass

Haiku by Kobayashi Issa

The Ministry of Going In by Christine Paice

American Names by Stepehn Vincent Benét

Is It Possible by Melissa Shook


Reading Janet Frame

January 12, 2011

This Tuesday’s Poem is Reading Janet Frame by Harvey McQueen, which is part of a tribute to the poet who died on Christmas Day by Mary McCallum who also posted Harvey McQueen RIP on her own blog.

Other tributes from Tuesday poets include:

After the Disaster chosen by Helen Lowe

Tribute to Harvey McQueen by Helen Rickerby at Winged Ink

Harvey McQueen 1934-2010 – an appreciation by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Farewell to Harvey McQueen by Saradha Koirala

Tuesday poem to remember Harvey McQueen That Selfsame Song by Thomas Hardy, from Mariana Isara


Tuesday’s poem invites

December 29, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem  invites entries for the Caselberg Trust’s inaugural competition.

Among the poems linked in the sidebar which caught my attention are:

Innocent’s Song by Charles Causley.

Bouquet of Dead Flowers by David Eggleton.

Near Morning by Melissa Green.

For Thomas on His First Birthday by Andrew Ball.

 House by Renee Liang.


On Being A Star

December 24, 2010

I don’t remember where I found this nor do I know who wrote it.

But the words helped me the first Christmas after my son died and I offer it in the hope they might help someone else.

On Being A Star

There are                                                

hundreds of stars 

New ones                                                

each day                                                   

and all of them                                       

lead to                                                     

the manger   

We begin                                                

small and                                                

helpless                                                   

like a                                                        

little piece                                               

of clay                                                     

but we grow 

The potter                                               

works at                                                 

the wheel      

The potter                                               

wants us to                                              

become stars        

We become stars                                     

by following stars   

In the eyes                                              

of those                                                    

who cannot see                                       

you are a fool                                           

to follow                                                   

any star

But for those                                                 

with                                                         

Christmas-eyes                                        

you are wise

The potter works                                       

at the wheel

The potter too                                          

is a star                                                    

But we aren’t

used to stars                                      

like that

We aren’t used                                   

to stars who                                        

are born                                             

in a stable                               

and hung                                           

on a cross

We aren’t used                                  

to stars                                            

who proposed                                    

things that                                        

don’t make sense                               

like                                                  

losing your life                         

and turning                                      

the other cheek                                 

and being poor                                  

for the sake                                    

of some kingdom                             

out there

I hope a star                                  

comes out                                       

for  you                                          

on Christmas Day

A new one                                     

and one                                  

you’ve never                                  

seen before

I hope it’s bright                             

and kind

And shines down

hard                                           

and long                                     

and well

To help you see                           

the things                                   

you’ve never seen before             

Allow yourself

to see

and you are

shaped

moulded

poured into

a Christmas-form

It takes

a long time

longer than

any season

Being born

is not easy

but it’s good

Bless me

occasionally

with your birth

It heals the

scared in me.

Vision upon

  vision

and of  His

fullness

we have all

received

Why else       

did He come

except

to be a star                             

a gift  

except

to heal

the scared

in us

To light our path

To help you see

the things

you really

need to see

I hope

it touches

you with

gentleness

and runs

along

beside you

all year long

Oh, how I hope

it comes

Running

Leaping

Laughing

Bounding

Shining

in your life

And when

the year

is through

Well, just because

it’s you

I hope

this star

keeps

shining on

 in you.

Because you see

 you are

someone

I’d like to give

a star.

*

If you need more inspiration, you’ll find it in No Vacancy (A Christmas Story) at Bowalley Road.


Why Do We Do What We Do?

December 21, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Why Do We Do What We Do by James Brown.

Sarah Jane Barnett who is this week’s editor paired the Tuesday Poets in a poetic version of  ”Secret Santa”  to post a poem or other offering by their ‘partner’ poet.

The results are linked in the sidebar and include:

How She Holds Her Head by Mary McCallum

Grapefruit by Clare Beynon

Cake With Fruit by Therese Clear

Christmas Baubles from Northland by Elizabeth Welsh

The Middle Ground by Belinda Hollyer

Elizabeth and Mary by Kathleen Jones

Kitchen Sonnets by Catherine Fitchett

Albedo by Harvey Malloy

Unnoticed by Harvey McQueen

countadowncountdownAuckland Countdown by Renee Liang

Xmas by Susan Landry

Christ in Aotearoa by Andrew Bell

Nerves by Sarah Jane Barnett

Burning With Joan of Arc by Helen Rickerby

Christmastide by Helen Lowe

Barksoup Winter by Jennifer Compton


To Stuart

December 15, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is To Stuart by Alistair Te Ariki Campbell.

Other Tuesday poems linked in the sidebar include:

Mary McCallum’s Notorious Veins

Alicia Ponder’s This Way to Grandma’s

And Saradha Koirala plays Whisper Down the Lane – fun with synonyms.


Hunt the Slipper

December 7, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is: Hunt the Slipper:  a romantic divertissement by Jo Thorpe.

Other Tuesday poems linked in the sidebar include:

Eulogy to Battles Lost  byAlicia Ponder.

The Wahine by Mary McCallum.

Tackling the Day by Pam Morrison.

 Dusk by Melissa Green


Fisherman

November 30, 2010

Fisherman by Brian Turner is this Tuesday’s poem.

It was chosen by Emma McCleary who writes:

I  love the utter quiet despair in this poem. I find that if you really listen and pay attention to the world then it’s often the small, the quiet and the unassuming people and things that have the most impact.  . .

. . .  This poem has a hollowing feel, a poignant sense of loss, and something that I too felt couldn’t completely be explained by words when people asked, “How are you?”

 Among links to other Tuesday poems int he side bar are:

Helen Lowe’s choice  Blue by Catherine Fitchett.

Catherine has just joined the Tuesday poets and her choice this week is Jim Brock’s Aubade: Good Daylight.

Helen Heath’s choice is The First Drummer Boy of Xmas by Jennifer Compton which starts:

 

Yesterday I was at the Mall and I heard

my first rendition of Little Drummer Boy.

 

Dear Lawd above – I said to myself – Xmas is hard upon us. For our sins.

It is time to head down the back paddock . . .

 

And at Stoatspring Harvey Malloy features Poem for a Geography Teacher by Anna Livesay.


Ressurection

November 23, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Ressurection by Michael McKimm.

Other Tuesday poets linked in the sdie bar include:

Elizabeth Welsh who went back to her childhood with Travel by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Creaming Before Dawn by Helen Lehndorf – a tribute to Ruth Dalla’s Milking Before Dawn.

Alicia Ponder’s Murdering Poetry.

How She Holds Her Head by Mary McCallum.

And Havery McQueen’s choice – Piwakaka by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman.


Cow Poem

November 16, 2010

Tuesday’s poem goes rural this week with Cow Poem by Chris Mansell.

Other Tuesday poems with links in the sidebar include:

Under the Influence by Mary McCallum.

A Manner of Speaking by Clare Beynon.

Rudyard Kipling’s Smuggler’s Song at An Affliction of Poetry took me back to primary school:

If you wake at midnight, and hear a horse’s feet,
Don’t go drawing back the blind, or looking in the street,
Them that ask no questions isn’t told a lie.
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by.
Five and twenty ponies,
Trotting through the dark –
Brandy for the Parson, ‘Baccy for the Clerk.
Laces for a lady; letters for a spy,
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by!  . .

Then there’s two which are both sad and powerful:

Vesper Sparrow’s How I died and Harvey McQueen’s Life Sentence.


The Hand That Signed the Paper

November 13, 2010

The Hand That Signed the Paper by Dylan Thomas was this Tuesday’s poem.

Among the 0ther Tuesday poets linked in the side bar which caught my eye were:

Ruby the Dark Haired Girl (1887-1997) at Bigger Than Ben Hur.

How to Pour Madness into a Teacup by Abegail Morely at A Writer’s Life.

Influenza at Vesper Sparrow’s Nest.

And Masking Tape’s a Must by Clare Beynon.


Truths

November 3, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Truths by Helen Heath.

Alicia Ponder who selected it says:

On the surface it is straighforward, but underneath it has an elegance and grace that is quite breathtaking.  I could wax lyrical, but that is hardly necessary as the poem speaks for itself. It stands alone, a beautiful truth, as rare as any jewel,. . .

It is. I’ve read it six times since coming across it on Tuesday and each time I find something more in it.

Among the links to other Tuesday poets in the sidebar are:

if it be your will by Leonard Cohen at Type What You See.

Beyond Silence by Saradha Koirala at Lalialand.

What You Take With You by Mary Mcallum.

Rural Delivery by Vivienne Plumb at Winged Ink.

The Pensioner by Harvey McQueen.


Ode to Chocolate

October 29, 2010

This Tuesday’s Poem is the delicious Ode to Chocolate by Barbara Crooker.

Tow other Tuesday poets who celebrated food:

Harvey McQueen with To Autumn by Ian Wedde.

Clare Beynon with her own Doris Plum.


The Time of the Giants

October 20, 2010

The Time of the Giants by Anne Kennedy is this Tuesday’s Poem.

Among contributions from other Tuesday poets  are:

 Deep Sea Swimming by Pam Morrison at Cadence.

Harvey McQueen’s Reading Janet Frame at Stoatspring.

Sotto Voce by Clare Beynon at All Finite Things reveal Infinitude.

Thanks by W.A. Merwin at Belinda Hollyer.

Savai’i by Mary McCallum, at O Audacious Book.

And Mariana Isara at Type What You See chose Being the Poem from Walt Whitman’s preface to Leaves of Grass.


Compass: A Triptych

October 13, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Compass: A Triptych by Nancy Mattson.

Among the links in the side bar are Renee Liang’s Open Letter to Mr Peter Brown of New Zealand First.

And A Greening by Saradha Koirala.

If you’re interested in, or puzzled by, poetry you may also enjoy Emma Neal’s piece in the ODT: Not all cats are black, not all poetry rhymes.


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