Don Everly 1.2.37 – 21.8.21

23/08/2021

Don Everly of the Everly Brothers has died:

Everly and his brother, Phil, had hits worldwide in the late 1950s and early 1960s, including Bye Bye Love and All I Have To Do Is Dream.

They were known for their close harmonies, and influenced groups like The Beatles and Simon and Garfunkel. . .


Te Aroha

04/04/2021

 

ED Musos:Tēnā koutou. Te Aroha is a waiata/song composed in 1983 by Morvin Te Anatipa Simon (Te Ātihanui-a-Pāpārangi, Ngāti Apa, Tūwharetoa).

Here you see it performed by health care workers from Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia in June 2020.

We send our love and support to everyone who has felt the impact of COVID-19.

Nō reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.

Lyrics: Te aroha Te whakapono Me te rangimārie Tātou tātou

Te Aroha – Love

Te whakapono – Faith

Me te rangimārie – And peace

Tātou tātou e – Be amongst us all


Gerry Marsden 24.9.42 – 3.1.21

04/01/2021

The world has lost another great musician:

Gerry and the Pacemakers singer Gerry Marsden, whose version of You’ll Never Walk Alone became a football terrace anthem for his hometown club of Liverpool, has died at the age of 78.

His family said he died on Sunday after a short illness not linked to Covid-19.

Marsden’s band was one of the biggest success stories of the Merseybeat era, and in 1963 became the first to have their first three songs top the chart.

But the band’s other best known hit was Ferry Cross The Mersey came in 1964.

It was written by Marsden himself as a tribute to his city, and reached number eight.

Marsden was made an MBE in 2003 for services to charity after supporting victims of the Hillsborough disaster. . .

Gerry and the Pacemakers worked the same Liverpool club circuit as The Beatles in the 1960s and were signed by the Fab Four’s manager Brian Epstein.

Epstein gave Marsden’s group the song How Do You Do It, which had been turned down by The Beatles and Adam Faith, for their debut single. . .

While Marsden was a songwriter as well as a singer, his most enduring hit was actually a cover of a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical number from 1945, that he had to convince his bandmates to record as their third single.

In many interviews over the years, he explained how fate played a part in his band ever recording the song. He was watching a Laurel and Hardy movie at Liverpool’s Odeon cinema in the early 1960s and, only because it was raining, he decided to stay for the second part of a double feature.

That turned out to be the film Carousel – which featured that song on its soundtrack – and Marsden was so moved by the lyrics that he became determined that it should become part of his band’s repertoire. . .

That song topped the charts in 1963. It was often on the radio when I was driving to and from Dunedin Hospital with our baby son in 1987 and listening to it it helped me with those difficult journeys.


Hark the Herald Angels Sing

25/12/2020


O Come All Ye Faithful

25/12/2020

Te Harinui

25/12/2020


O Holy Night

24/12/2020


Away In A Manger

24/12/2020


When a Child is Born

24/12/2020


Little Drummer Boy (Peace on Earth)

24/12/2020


Let There Be Peace On Earth

20/12/2020

Voices of Hope Children’s Choir:


Whanau Voices of Aotearoa Far From Home

25/11/2020

UK-based New Zealand singers have come together to deliver a musical love song far from home:

As the arts continue to suffer internationally due to this pandemic, New Zealand’s UK based opera singers are coming together to record a concert of purely NZ/Māori/Pasifika songs to be broadcast and shared internationally from the Royal Albert Hall this November.

What started as just a simple idea of performing again has grown into something that is bringing dozens of Kiwi performers together from all around the UK to share and celebrate our country, our culture, and what unites us.  We have been silenced for months through no fault of our own and we are incredibly proud and excited to share the smallest of insights into what it feels to be us at the moment: what our Whānau means to us, and how we long for home, for better times and to be together once again. 

We are hugely grateful to the Kiri Te Kanawa Foundation, Royal Albert Hall, Foundation for Australia & New Zealand Arts, NZ High Commission, RNZ Concert (our proud broadcasting partner for this concert) without whom we couldn’t be performing, and the ongoing support of our colleagues and friends back in NZ: Auckland Opera Studio, New Zealand Opera, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music, Chamber Music New Zealand, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, and all our family and friends.

Please join us for the release of this concert, set for broadcast later in November, to enjoy some of NZ’s finest opera singers and musicians performing a stunning concert of NZ/Māori/Pasifika songs and ensembles. Please consider donating to help each one of these world class singers/musicians through this incredibly tough time, and we hope you enjoy this concert: our ode to Aotearoa/New Zealand.

Ngā mihi nui,

Kiwi opera singers in London

You can donate to help here.

RNZ has a story on the concert here.


Look to the Far Horizon

11/10/2020

First movement of Look to the Far Horizon by Peter Adams from the album Parlour Games, performed by the Jade Quartet in Auckland. 

 


Helen Reddy 25.10.41 – 29.9.20

30/09/2020

Australian singer and feminist icon, Helen Reddy has died:

The Melbourne-born Reddy, whose trailblazing life was dramatised in the recent bio-pic I Am Woman, was regarded as the queen of 1970s pop with her hits including Delta Dawn, Angie Baby, Leave Me Alone (Ruby Red Dress) and Ain’t No Way To Treat A Lady.

After arriving in New York as a 24-year-old single mother of a three-year-old with just over $US200 to her name, she overcame years of struggle in the US to become the world’s top-selling female singer in 1973 and 1974.

She won a Grammy for I Am Woman, had her own weekly prime-time television variety show and branched into an acting career on screen and stage that included a Golden Globe nomination for Airport 1975.

The stirring anthem that became her best-known hit turned her into a feminist icon. . . 


RSA – fan brigade

19/09/2020

Sound of Silence

02/08/2020

Keith Highlanders’ lockdown performance of Sound of Silence:


Peter Green 29.10.46 – 25.7.20

26/07/2020

Peter Green who co-founded Fleetwood Mac has died.

Peter Green, who has died aged 73, was one of the greatest Blues guitarists Britain ever produced.

His shape-shifting riffs and long, improvisational excursions made Fleetwood Mac one of the most exciting live bands of the 1960s Blues explosion.

He first picked up a hand-me-down guitar at the age of 10 and, like many of his peers, began to devour the import vinyl that trickled into the UK from the States. He studied the greats – Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy and BB King – combining their tensely coiled playing style with the shimmering vibrato of The Shadows’ Hank Marvin.

But he actually started his professional career as a bassist, until an encounter with Eric Clapton persuaded him to ditch the instrument.

“I decided to go back on lead guitar after seeing him with the Bluesbreakers. He had a Les Paul, his fingers were marvellous. The guy knew how to do a bit of evil, I guess.”

He later had the seemingly impossible task of taking over from Clapton in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Fans were unconvinced at first, but after a handful of incendiary performances, he won them over, earning the nickname “The Green God”.

The musician was humble about his skills, however. “I didn’t really know what I was doing on the guitar,” he later told Guitarist Magazine. “I was very lucky to get anything remotely any good. I used to dash around on stepping stones, that’s what I used to call it.”

Mick Fleetwood on the early Fleetwood Mac

In 1967 he poached Fleetwood and bass player John McVie from Mayall and formed Fleetwood Mac – naming the group after its rhythm section.

It was here that his compositional skills came to the fore – creating songs that were tender and truthful, but often with an undercurrent of menace. Black Magic Woman incorporated Latin blues and two exquisite solos, while Oh Well’s pounding riffs inspired a thousand metal bands. . .


For the Longest Time

27/05/2020

Phoenix Chamber Choir

 

We’re less locked up than we were, but still have at least another four weeks at Level 2.

This allows almost all businesses to operate, but there’s a big difference between being able to operate and operating profitably.


Brdige Over Torubled Water for the NHS

17/05/2020

Here is an extraordinary performance of ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water‘ by the brave men and women from NHS in honor of the Llandudno’s Venu Cymru, which has been turned into a temporary coronavirus hospital. During this process, the facility has been renamed to Ysbyty Enfys, which is Welsh for Rainbow Hospital, as a symbol for hope.


Hey That’s No Way To Say Goodbye

13/05/2020

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