Own life sentence

June 5, 2015

The woman who admitted the manslaughter of her son after she left him in her car  has been discharged without conviction.

. . . Justice France was satisfied that the consequences of a conviction would be out of proportion to her culpability. . .

This is justice showing mercy.

The bereaved parents’ club is one no-one chooses to join.

It is against the natural order to outlive our children.

It is difficult enough to lose a child through no-one’s fault, it must be so much worse for a parent who, whatever the court says, will always blame herself .

This mother will be serving her own life sentence.

I hope everyone in the family has the love and support they need as they grieve and that in time they are able to accept that the best tribute to the child who died is to live, better and happier lives because he can’t.


Addressing hardship better than measuring manufactured poverty

May 28, 2015

A few years ago a newspaper asked Oamaru clergy to comment on poverty.

One vicar said that he came from South Africa where hundreds of people shared a single cold water tap which made it difficult for him to comment on a town where people drove to the food bank.

The dictionary defines poverty as the state of being extremely poor.

The measuring class—people with tertiary education who spend all their time telling us how much misery there is in our community  have manufactured a new definition – 60% of the median income.

By that measure poverty could only be solved by taking everyone’s money and redistributing it equally and ensuring it stayed redistributed equally for ever.

While gross inequality can be a problem, making the rich poorer will not address the causes of, nor provide a longterm solution to, the problems of the very poor.

This is why Finance Minister Bill English took a swing at critics of the government on ‘poverty’:

“The term ‘poverty’ has been captured by a particular idea of how you measure poverty and a particular solution to it. That is, you measure it relative to incomes, and the solution is mass redistribution.”

Those who use the term “poverty” and “child poverty” in this way have been “admirably open” about their objectives, Mr English told the meeting but it is not a view the government shares.

“We are not addressing that phenomenon. What we are addressing is absolute levels of hardship. That is someone not having enough to live, and we don’t think that is worse just because someone else has a bit more.”

Incomes are only one part of what keeps people at the bottom of the social heap, he says, and other factors matter more.

“What we are addressing is what I think is the kind of communal or moral dimension and the worst examples of it are not purely about poverty. They are about ways of behaving, and I don’t think poverty is an excuse for serial criminality or beating up your kids. But those are parts of the ways of behaving of parts of our community, in my view sometimes made worse by the way the government deals with some of these problems.” . . .

It is not often a politician talks about the moral dimension and that should not be taken to mean that moral problems are the preserve of the poor.

But when Northland GP Lance O’Sullivan says children will be better off away from their homes and the social dysfunction in them, the problem of hardship is not just a financial one.

When National came to government it took an actuarial look at welfare and uncovered the longterm costs of it.

Those costs were both financial and social which is why reducing dependency and addressing real hardship are so important.

It doesn’t matter what you call it, the problem is whether or not people have enough which in turn begs the question how much is enough?

Regardless of the answer, the solution lies in addressing real hardship, as this government is doing, not by manufacturing poverty by redefining it in a misguided attempt to solve it through redistribution.


Whole World

May 10, 2015

Searching for mother at Story People gave me so many wonderful words, I couldn’t choose just one so here’s a bonus:

whole world StoryPeople print by Brian Andreas

 

Moms come in all shapes & sizes, but they’re pretty easy to recognize because they’re the ones who teach you stuff all the time about how to be in the world & sometimes that sounds a lot like: chew with your mouth closed, sit still. stand up straight, be polite, Look them in the eye. & sometimes it seems like that sort of thing doesn’t add up to a whole lot. Until the day you feel the soft ache of love in your heart that makes you take care with a friend who hurts or when you look in a stranger’s tired eyes & you stop & smile. Or when you listen to the ABC song for the thousandth time & you laugh & say ‘again’ & suddenly you understand that is the real thing moms do & it adds up to the whole world.

Whole World  ©2014 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

You can sign up for a daily dose of whimsy like this at Story People.


$ value of stay at home mother

May 10, 2015

Hat tip: Utopia  from Salary.Com


Sunday Soapbox

May 10, 2015

Sunday’s  soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.
Image result for quotes mother

A mother is not a person to lean on but a person to make leaning unnecessary – Dorothy C. Fisher.


Saturday’s smiles

May 9, 2015

A young girl was wathing her mother work when she noticed that her mother had several strands of white hair in stark contrast to her dark brown hair.

The little girl asked, “Why are some of your hairs white, Mom?”

“Well, every time that you do something wrong and make me sador upset, one of my hairs turns white,” her mother replied.

The little girl thought about her mother’s words for a few moments and then said, “Mummy, how come all of grandma’s hairs are white?”


Critical Mass

April 21, 2015

Discussion on Critical Mass with Noelle McCarthy today was sparked by:

* Owner’s Manual for a Child by Donna Bryant Goertz (hat tip to Not PC).

* Finding Your Voice at the Kitchensgarden (hat tip to Valerie Davies).

and

* 25 live changing style charts every guy needs in his life by Julie Gerstein.


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