366 days of gratitude

13/09/2016

The request to do book reviews on the local radio station came at just the right time.

With two pre-schoolers, one of whom had multiple disabilities, I wasn’t in a position to take on full time work but the offer gave me the excuse to read and call it work.

One of the books in the first pile I was given to review was Grievous Bodily  by Craig Harrison.*

It made me laugh out loud and has done each of the many times I’ve re-read it.

I came across it again last night, started reading and with a very few minutes was laughing.

It’s one of very few books I’ve read that have that affect and with every laugh I’m grateful for it.

*( It was published in 1991 and probably only available second-hand now).


Rural round-up

05/07/2016

The Snow Farmer – John Lee of the Cardrona Valley – Beattie’s Book BLog:

The Snow Farmer

John Lee of the Cardrona Valley
Sally Rae
Photographs by Stephen Jaquiery
Published by Random House NZ; July 1, 2016; RRP: $50

“John’s story is one to inspire others. It’s a story of a man with a vision, and the strength of personality and the strong relationships with others to make it happen. It’s a Kiwi story of grit and determination of which we can all be proud.” –

Helen Clark, Former Prime Minister of New Zealand (1999-2008).

John Lee has always been a law unto himself. Entrepreneurial, inventive, determined, he hailed from a farming background in the Cardrona Valley; the third of five boys. Schooled in Oamaru, the young John Lee was no fan of the classroom – he was good at maths, but struggled with words– preferring to spend his time dreaming about the day he would farm in his beloved Cardrona Valley. . . .

Fed Farmers launch new sustainability scheme:

An initiative aimed at directing farmers towards sustainable use of land and water has been launched by Federated Farmers.

The farming lobby group’s president Dr William Rolleston, announced the establishment of the Land Water Stewardship initiative at its conference this morning.

Dr Rolleston said the initiative would be a small group that would work together to propose solutions to take the economy and the environment forward and engage with farmers . . .

‘Best in the world’ fruit in demand – Jill Herron:

The Cromwell Basin is now producing around half of New Zealand’s export cherries and they are “the best in the world”.

Quite a claim, but one that can be confidently made, in relation to the Asian palate anyway, newly-elected chairman of Summerfruit NZ, Tim Jones, says.

“We think they are the best in the world and our market is telling us they are. That’s one of the reasons we can charge up to $25 a kg, because we deliver on the promise that when someone over there lifts the lid on a box of our cherries, they will go wow.”

Cherry plantings around Cromwell had expanded in recent years, mainly into the Mount Pisa area, as the Southeast Asian markets developed, Mr Jones said. . . 

Silver Fern confident – Sally Rae:

September 30 has been agreed in principle by Silver Fern Farms and Shanghai Maling as the revised date to meet Overseas Investment Office approval for their joint venture.

SFF has been awaiting an announcement from the OIO since farmer shareholders voted in favour of the deal last October.

More time was needed to answer the further information requests from the OIO and then to provide sufficient time for the OIO and then Government ministers to consider the application.

SFF continued to believe the investment would be approved “given its substantial merits”, chief executive Dean Hamilton said in a statement. . . 

Waterways project wins environment funding:

Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith and Māori Party co-leader Marama Fox have announced more than $376,000 of funding to improve water quality in seven waterways in the Manawatū-Whanganui and Taranaki regions.

Local iwi Ngaa Rauru Kiitahi will lead the Te Kāhui o Rauru Trust’s Waterways Restoration Project, working with both local and central government.

“The Government is committed to improving water quality in the Manawatū-Whanganui and Taranaki regions. This initiative is focused on the Kai Iwi, Ototoka and Ōkehu streams, the Waitōtara riverbank, Tapuarau Lagoon, the middle reaches of the Waitōtara River and the Whenuakura River,” Dr Smith says.

“Te Kāhui o Rauru Trust clearly understands the issues in these waterways and its project offers realistic, achievable objectives. It has focused clearly on protecting and restoring the seven waterways and moreover has recognised the need to develop ways to monitor the ongoing health of these rivers, lagoon and streams.” . . 

Marlborough Sounds Salmon Working Group to be established:

The Marlborough District Council and the Ministry for Primary Industries will establish a Marlborough Sounds Salmon Working Group to consider options to implement the Best Management Practice Guidelines for Salmon Farming in the Marlborough Sounds (the guidelines). Other agencies that will have input into the process include the Department of Conservation and the Ministry for the Environment.

The working group will meet starting in July and provide recommendations to Marlborough District Council and the Government on implementing the guidelines.

Ministry for Primary Industries Deputy Director General Ben Dalton said the public, the council, government and industry have shown a commitment to implement the guidelines. . . 

Guy attending primary sector leaders’ bootcamp:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy departs for Stanford University today to attend a primary sector leaders bootcamp, focused on developing collaboration and innovation. 

“The week-long conference is part of the Te Hono movement, bringing together Chief Executives and leaders with a vison to accelerate the transformation of the primary sector by adding value and creating demand,” says Mr Guy.

“As a Government we have a goal of doubling the value of primary sector exports by 2025 and sector leaders share our ambition to explore new ways of collaboration and building capability in our people. . . 

10 Reasons Why Kids Brought Up in Agriculture Make the Best Employees – Raised in a Barn:

Kids involved in agriculture are truly one of a kind. They possess a unique skill set unlike anyone else. For the record, there are more than 10 reasons why you should hire an ag kid, but here are some of the best and most important reasons why ag kids make the best employees.

  1. They understand the importance of being on time.

For Ag kids they know that time is of the essence and wasting daylight is not an option. Even if your five minutes late feeding that show lamb, it will notice. You can expect us to be 15 minutes early because that’s what we’ve learned from our time at the barn.

  1. Respect is something they value more than anything.

They have worked hard in the show ring to be well-respected so they understand that respect isn’t something that’s given it’s EARNED. FFA taught them to, “…believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others.” . . .

 


366 days of gratitude

06/06/2016

Farms don’t follow a nine-to-five working day or a five-day working week. Even so, weekends are usually quieter and long weekends provide an excuse to do as much or as little as you want.

I began the day with a longish (10km) walk, am finishing it with a good book (Everyone Brave is Forgiven  by Chris Cleave) and I’m grateful for both.

UPDATE – whoops, just realised I’ve done two gratitude posts today. Must count my blessings there’s so much for which I”m grateful. 🙂


Bookarama retrospective

22/05/2016

Preparing for and working at Rotary’s Bookarama has occupied me for the best part of  the past week.

People-watchers would find the buyers interesting. Dealers line up at the door before opening morning and run to the tables, others take a more leisurely approach. Some come once, some make return visits. Some are looking for particular titles or authors, others are less prescriptive. Some seek advice or want to chat, others are happy to browse and buy by themselves.

Quite a few buy bag loads of books, many of which they will donate back next year for re-sale, some buy in singles or small numbers.

A few unusual books are individually priced, few for more than $10 and those published recently are also priced – $2 for those from 2011 and 12; $4 for 2013 and 14 and $6 for the last two years. Children’s books are sold at two for $1, Mills and Boons go for $10 a box and all other books are just $1 each.

When it comes to paying, some forgo generous amounts of change while others accept small amounts back. That should not be seen to be judging anyone. Someone’s $9 change from a $20 note for 10 books might not be as important as another’s $1 from a $20 note for 19 books.

In the last few years we’ve found no interest in encyclopedias, atlases or dictionaries and hard back fiction isn’t as popular as paperbacks.

Today we’ll be cleaning up. Left over children’s books will go to the food bank, any good quality books left will be packed up for next year, some of the old books might be offered to dealers and the rest will go to the resource recovery centre for sale or recycling.

This is the club’s biggest annual fundraiser and all proceeds go to the community.

It depends on the generosity of people who donate books, those who buy them and others, not all of whom are Rotary members, who sort and sell them. It’s hard work but also both enjoyable and rewarding.

 

 

 


366 days of gratitude

30/04/2016

One person’s good read won’t always appeal to another but sometimes it does.

Today I’m grateful for the recommendations of friends whose idea of a good read corresponds with mine.


366 days of gratitude

30/03/2016

I wasn’t going to buy any more books until I’d finished all the ones on the to-be-read pile.

But life is too short to by-pass the possibility of a good read even if I’m going to have to wait to read it.

Today I’m grateful for something to add to my to-be-read pile and the feeling of security that comes with it from knowing I’m more than enough books away from having nothing new to read.


366 days of gratitude

22/03/2016

A neighbour was disposing of books and invited me to take any that interested me before they went.

One of those I picked was The Night Life of the Gods by Thorne Smith.

It made me laugh out loud the first time I read it and I find it just as amusing when I re-read it.

Today I’m grateful for this and other books which make me laugh.


366 days of gratitude

16/03/2016

When we were in San Francisco several years ago we stumbled on a book store on our way back to our hotel after dinner.

It had three floors of stock, comfortable leather chairs, a cafe and loos. I wondered if I’d died and gone to heaven.

I don’t remember it’s name but I still have the collection of Erma Bombeck books I bought there.

That was before the days of internet shopping and while I do use Fishpond, and find it very good for sourcing books no longer available in shops, I still prefer to buy from a shop.

My favourite bookshop closer to home is the University Bookshop in Dunedin and I can always rely on my local Paper Plus in Oamaru to give good service.

Today I’m grateful for bookshops.


Umberto Eco: 5.1.32 – 19.2.16

22/02/2016

Italian author Umberto Eco has died:

Eco, who was perhaps best known for his 1980 work the Name of the Rose, was one of the world’s most revered literary names…

He was the 1992-3 Norton professor at Harvard and taught semiotics at Bologna University and once suggested that writing novels was a mere part-time occupation, saying: “I am a philosopher; I write novels only on the weekends.”

The Name of the Rose was Eco’s first novel but he had been publishing works for more than 20 years beforehand.

He discussed his approach to writing in an interview at a Guardian Live event in London last year. “I don’t know what the reader expects,” he said. “I think that Barbara Cartland writes what the readers expect. I think an author should write what the reader does not expect. The problem is not to ask what they need, but to change them … to produce the kind of reader you want for each story.” . . 

Image result for umberto eco quotes

Read prophets and those prepared to die for the truth, for as a rule they make many others die with them, often before them, at times instead of them.

Image result for umberto eco quotes

I believe that what we become depends on what our fathers teach us at odd moments, when they aren’t trying to teach us. We are formed by little scraps of wisdom.

 


366 days of gratitude

27/01/2016

Once I started a book I used to keep going.

Now if I can’t get into it I give up, preferring to spend precious reading time on something I enjoy.

That said some books are read-once and forget, others go into the favourite category to be read and re-read.

At this time of year I always re-read some of my very favourite books and today I’m grateful to the authors whose work gives enduring pleasure.


Quote of the day

16/12/2015

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. – Jane Austen who was born on this day in 1817.


Quote of the day

14/09/2015

. . . Liberally sprinkling a book aimed at youngsters with foul language – of a kind that not so long ago would have led to arrest – is no way to increase anyone’s literacy. Certainly not that of teenagers.

Writers have plenty of perfectly good expressive words in the English language to choose from, without reducing literary and language standards to the lowest common denominator.

While bad language may be the norm in the playground, you can bet it isn’t tolerated in the classrooms of teachers marching to the freedom-of-speech drum.

And why are young males from “educational deprived backgrounds” taught that swearing is a good way for them to communicate? Does this mean they are written-off as knuckle-dragging proles?

Youngsters need inspiration, guidance and discipline if they are to engage fruitfully, communicate decently with each other and make their mark.

They don’t have many role models, not if the swearing heard on buses and around bars and cafes is anything to go by.

There’s no need for it…Charles Dickens didn’t do it that way – and he knew about deprived backgrounds.Jock Anderson


Quote of the day

06/07/2015

We do not belong to those who have ideas only among books, when stimulated by books. It is our habit to think outdoors — walking, leaping, climbing, dancing, preferably on lonely mountains or near the sea where even the trails become thoughtful. – Friedrich Nietzsche.

Hat tip: Rob Hosking in a post on walking – ‘that suspensive heaven’ which is topped by a stunning photo above Lake Wanaka and that anyone to whom walking, thinking, and just slowing down appeals and noticing will enjoy.


Isn’t every day Book Day?

23/04/2015

Every day is Book Day for me.

It doesn’t mean I read at least a few chapters of a book every day, though there was a time when I did and at one stage it was several books a week.

It does mean that I love books and feel discombobulated should I not have something to read at hand should boredom or the opportunity to lose myself in the pages present itself.

I’ve read a few electronic books but still prefer real books with pages that turn and which can be passed on to others when I’ve read them.

Anyway, World Book Day was March the 5th but in support of my contention that every day is book day, it’s being celebrated in Oamaru’s Victorian Precinct  today.
Oamaru's Victorian Precinct's photo.


The Farm At Black Hills

20/04/2015

The Farm At Black Hill is the story not only of the farm and the families who farmed it.

It weaves in the history of the Hurunui District, merino wool and the Romney and Corriedale sheep breeds

Most of all it is a memoir of the very full life of Beverley Forrester, a woman who, as she quips to one of her staff, is not afraid of hard work.

Beverley was brought up on a farm on Matakana Road, near Warkworth, by parents who modelled a strong work ethic and taught their family the importance of community involvement.

She trained as an occupational therapist and soon after graduating was appointed charge OT at Templeton Hospital.

While working in various posts as an OT, Beverley continued to follow her interest in coloured sheep. An invitation to judge at the Cheviot Show led to a meeting with Jim Forrester and she moved to Black Hills.

The marriage was a happy but short one. After just 10 years Beverley was widowed and found herself in charge of the farm.

Eventually she had to accept Black Hills was too big for her and she sold most of it to focus on other work.

She and her staff undertook the restoration of the farm’s historic limestone buildings which became a tourist attraction.

She also followed her passion for wool. English cousins helped her set up a shop in Henley-On-Thames. She exports to several countries, has her own fashion label and her clothes have been shown at New Zealand Fashion Week.

Beverley writes in a matter-of-fact style on everything from dagging sheep to meeting royalty.

I finished this book in awe of what she has accomplished.

You can find out more at her website Black Hills.

The Farm AT Black Hills, Farming Alone in the Hills of North Canterbury by Beverley Forrester with John McCrystal, published by Penguin Random House.

blackhills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All royalties from the book are being donated to Rural Women NZ.


Open Season

31/03/2015

Dave Witherow’s book, Open Season, An Angler’s Life in New Zealand, sat on my to-read shelf for weeks.

I know little about fishing and my interest in it is no better than my knowledge.

But I picked up the book last week and was not only hooked but reeled in by the tales of fishing, fishers and their adventures.

As Kevin Ireland says in the forward:

. . . The sheer pleasure of Dave’s abilities and craftsmanship always save the day. His writing has the same relaxed, discursive and illuminating brilliance of his conversation. . .

This is why he managed to keep someone with little interest in fishing reading. He writes well, keeping the reader engaged with the adventures and escapades he and his mates have enjoyed.

This includes crossing a flooded river on a raft constructed from lilos and building his own plane to enable him to get to good fishing spots more easily.

Open Season is an easy and entertaining read which will appeal most to anglers and other outdoor adventurers, but could also hook those like me who know little about the sport.

openseason

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Season, An Angler’s Life in New Zealand by Dave Witherow, published by Random House.

 


Judges’ decision

30/01/2015

Miriama Kamo, convenor of judges for the New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014 responds to Eleanor Catton’s criticism:

Esteemed academic Peter Munz once said to me, “The wonderful thing about the humanities is the lack of one answer to any issue, there is always debate, there must always be discussion and there may not ever be consensus.”  

 I’m reminded of this as I watch, with a mix of admiration and dismay, the debate fuelled by Eleanor Catton’s comments about the political state of our nation and her feeling that she is a victim of a ‘tall poppy’ syndrome. I am interested in listening to all of it, but wish only to comment, as the convenor of the judging panel of the New Zealand Post Book Awards 2014, on the continuing conversation surrounding our decision-making.

The New Zealand Post Book Awards is a multi-category, multi-genre competition. It is quite unlike the Man Booker competition, which considers only fiction. The Luminaries won the Man Booker competition, a thrilling achievement. Last year it went on to win the New Zealand Post Book Awards prize for fiction.  In doing so, it won New Zealand’s equivalent of the Man Booker. It then went into contention for the supreme prize against three other exemplary finalists of different genres.  It did not win that supreme prize; Jill Trevelyan’s book Peter McLeavey: The Life and Times of a New Zealand Art Dealer did.  

I’m as impressed as I am bemused by Eleanor Catton’s belief that The Luminaries should have won the supreme prize. I’m impressed because we don’t have a proud history of owning our achievements, of proudly proclaiming our talents. Perhaps this is a by-product of a nation that did suffer a ‘tall poppy’ syndrome. Comments like Eleanor’s make me believe that this is changing. But I’m bemused because, putting aside that it diminishes the achievement of the supreme prize winner, Jill Trevelyan, it betrays a belief that our judging panel should have fallen into line with an international panel of judges. This is at odds with Eleanor saying that she grew up with the erroneous view that Kiwi writers, and by extension Kiwis generally, were somehow less than British and American ones; that we did not, and perhaps do not, back our own opinions or our own talent.

There was no sense on our judging panel that it was ‘someone else’s’ turn to win. We made a literary judgement, not a political statement. Given that our opinion did happen to align with the Man Booker judges and we did award The Luminaries our top fiction prize, it is at least churlish and, at most, mischievous to suggest that The Luminaries did not win its due in New Zealand.  

But then, that’s the beauty of the humanities. Such decisions rightly inspire debate. Like the Man Booker judges, we were a group of individuals making a collective decision. We worked hard at the task in front of us and, in my view, we made wise and well-placed decisions. I was proud to honour Eleanor’s incredible work, The Luminaries. I was proud to award prizes to all the finalists that night of the New Zealand Post Book Awards, and to crown, as supreme winner, Jill Trevelyan’s book Peter McLeavey: The Life and Times of a New Zealand Art Dealer.  It deserved to win.  But in the grand tradition of debating and discussing the arts, I urge you to read all of our finalists before making up your own mind.

Well said and isn’t it good that she says it by way of addressing the criticism and not criticising the critic?

David Farrar also responds to Catton reasonably at Kiwiblog and Trans Tasman opined:

Catton . . . 
illustrated the old wisdom “artists are children,” and it is a little baffling why people seem to expect profundities about politics from them.  In Catton’s case, she is only the latest in the long tradition of NZ literary types who feel their country is too grubby and philistine for them to bear for too long.

It is one of the most tiresomely adolescent aspects of the Kiwi arts scene, and it gets more intense whenever their fellow NZers are so uncouth as to elect National Govts.

Catton isn’t a “traitor” though, despite what talkback host Sean Plunket – increasingly resembling a retired Rotarian – called her on his programme. It is just another case of artists being a bit silly. There is no need for this sort of over-reaction.

Quite.


Hard Country A Golden Bay Life

17/12/2014

hard

Robin and Garry Robilliard had big dreams of owning their own farm but only a very small budget with which to purchase one.

Knowing better properties closer to town were out of their reach they settled for Rocklands, a rundown property on very marginal hill country over the Takaka Hill from Nelson.

Not only the farm was rundown, the house was too, allowing too easy access for mice and rats.

The three previous owners went broke trying to farm the property and given the challenges they faced the Robilliards could easily have done so too.

But they were determined to keep hold of their dream and their farm and they persevered where many others would not have.

Farming this hard country required demanding physical work and mental toughness.

Robin recounts the their trials and triumphs without self-pity and with a sense of humour, painting a vivid picture of their life  and times and the people who played a part in them.

Farming and raising their children would have been enough for most women but Robin also managed to write entertaining accounts of their life for the Auckland Weekly and was a guest on the TV programme Beauty and the Beast.

This led to opportunities for travel writing and accounts of her travels behind the iron curtain are included in the book.

Hard Country is an interesting and  inspirational read which will appeal to a wide audience, not just those with a connection to farming.

That said, if you have a farmer in want of a Christmas present, this book would make a good one.

Hard Country A Golden Bay Life by Robin Robilliard is published by Random House.


No sex please, he’s Paddington

19/11/2014

Michael Bond, the author of the Paddington Bear books is upset that UK censors warned parents the new film based on his beloved bear contains sexual “innuendo” and “bad language”.

Censors at the British Board of Film Classification have given the Paddington movie a Parental Guidance (PG) certificate because it features “dangerous behaviour, mild threat, innuendo, infrequent mild bad language”.

The news has upset Michael Bond, the writer behind the original book series, and he fears he may be in for a nasty surprise when he eventually sees the film based on his creation. . .

Censors issued the guidelines based on a scene in the film in which a villain “threatens to kill and stuff” Paddington Bear and a comical moment when a man dressed as a woman is flirted with by another man. . .

If that’s all it is, it’s pretty mild but if it’s not suitable for children of all ages I have a lot of sympathy for Bond.

The books were delightful and innocent, surely it wouldn’t be too hard for the film to be that way too.

Sex sells but so do good stories and it should be possible to be true to the spirit of book, including its innocence,  in taking it from the page to the screen.


Writers on writing and science on science

11/11/2014

Discussion on Critical Mass with Simon Mercep today was sparked by:

and


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