Word of the day

16/09/2022

Umbethink– to recall to mind, remember, recollect.


Sowell says

16/09/2022


Rural round-up

16/09/2022

Up a creek – Rural News:

The agriculture sector is continuing to find the rocky road to a solution to ag emissions may be paved with good intentions, but the outcome is a mess.

Ever since the formation of the Primary Sector Climate Action Partnership, made up of 11 sector groups, as well as Māori and the Government, it has courted controversy and struggled to get farmer buy in.

The partnership’s He Waka Eke Noa (HWEN) current recommendations for mitigating agricultural emissions now appear to be up a creek without a paddle.

HWEN has struggled for farmer support from the very start. The partnership – especially the primary sector groups – have done a poor job in communicating with farmers. They have also been arrogant and dismissive of ongoing farmer concerns. . . .

Carbon credits are not created equal – Keith Woodford:

Carbon offsets are fundamental to New Zealand’s greenhouse-gas policies. However, not all offsets are created equal. That sets the scene for all sorts of games to be played, with winners and losers. This is further complicated by marketing ploys that can lack transparency as to what is actually being bought and sold, and where the credits have come from.

Understanding something about carbon offsets is fundamental to understanding the current drivers of forestry in New Zealand. Offset rules also lie at the heart of whether sequestration credits have official status.

At an official level, carbon offsets in New Zealand operate through the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS).  Within this scheme, emitters purchase credits that have been allocated by Government to other people as a reward for sequestering carbon, typically through carbon forestry.

The current price for those credits, set by supply and demand in the market place, is about $85 per tonne of carbon.  . . 

Passing the ball to young Maori in ag recruitment drive – Charlie Williamson :

Sports event will see MPs face-off against dairy farmers and industry leaders.

DairyNZ is organising a memorial sports event with the aim of attracting young Māori into the dairy sector. 

The John Luxton Memorial Event will feature local dairy farmers, sector leaders, MPs and a former All Black facing off in light-hearted but competitive rugby and netball games. 

A dairy sector netball and rugby team, including local parents, children, grandchildren and others from rural communities will face off against parliamentary teams consisting of MPs and parliamentary advisors.  . . 

 

New markets for venison and more productive deer farms :

The deer farming industry is celebrating the success of a strategy that has resulted in successful venison market development in China and a retail breakthrough in the United States. It has also resulted in increased productivity on deer farms.

Known as Passion2Profit (P2P), it aimed to convert the passion that farmers have for their deer into greater farm profitability. Seven years and $14 million later it has resulted in the development of major new markets for venison and greater productivity on deer farms.

P2P was part of government’s Primary Growth Partnership programme and was funded 50/50 by the Ministry for Primary Industries and Deer Industry NZ.

Independent programme chair, Bruce Wills, says venison marketers have done what he describes as a “fabulous job” pivoting to retail, with prices well on the way to recovering from a Covid induced slump. . . 

Golden opportunity for Scott technology with Silver Fern Farms :

Scott Technology (NZX:SCT) is pleased to announce the signing of a multi-million dollar contract with one of New Zealand’s leading producers of premium red meat, Silver Fern Farms.

The $11.2 million investment will see Scott deliver a fully automated lamb processing system for the Silver Fern Farms Finegand plant in South Otago, designed to deliver exceptional product quality and increased yield of high value cuts.

Scott Technology CEO, John Kippenberger, says that they are delighted to be partnering once again with one of New Zealand’s most iconic meat producers and exporters.

“Silver Fern Farms is an enduring partner of Scott Technology. In the late 2000s we worked in collaboration to develop an early iteration of our automated lamb processing technology. The new primal system utilises advanced x-ray and vision technology to deliver even higher accuracy cutting, while also enabling important improvements in health and safety by removing much of the manual heavy cutting activity.” . .

Dutch farmers topple Agriculture Minister leading radical climate agenda – Frank Bergman:

The Netherlands’ agricultural minister Henk Staghouwer has been forced to resign following widespread protests from Dutch farmers over his radical climate agenda that seeks to destroy their livelihoods.

Staghouwer was leading the Dutch agriculture ministry’s climate policy that involved confiscating farms in a forced government buy-out scheme.

In the wake of the huge protests from farmers, Staghouwer has now been forced to step down.

He told the Dutch cabinet that pushback from farmers had meant he would not be able to meet a September deadline for rolling out the government’s radical green policy, the AP reported. . .


Taxpayer talk – Des Gorman

16/09/2022

Peter Williams interviews Professor Des Gorman at Taxpayer Talk:

On this week’s episode of Tax Payer Talk, Peter Wiliams speaks to Des Gorman – Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Auckland University – about a new paper from the New Zealand Initiative which claims that evidence for a separate Maori Health Authority is seriously lacking. Peter then reads your correspondence.


What’s happened to balance?

16/09/2022

David Farrar has made a rare, for him, complaint to the media on reporting the results of an online survey as a poll:

Readers might not understand the difference between an opt-in survey and a poll that follows the country’s polling code and being told that one candidate is a clear favourite might influence votes.

Whether this is a deliberate attempt to help the candidate in question is moot, but deliberate or not it could and it’s not something any serious media should do.

Extensive coverage in last week’s Listener of a Nelson mayoral candidate, Matt Lawry could also be seen as an attempt to influence voters.

Four and a half pages cover him, one the other candidate, Nick Smith, gets just half a page, the other five candidates don’t get even that.

Bob Jones notes:

. . .Smith, unsurprisingly given his engineering doctorate, played a key role as a senior Cabinet Minister in the rebuilds following the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes.

In the year since his retirement he’s been involved in creating a windfarm. It will be interesting to watch the outcome of this election between a talker and a doer. 

But The Listener gave more than four times coverage to the talker than it did to the doer.

What’s happened to balanced reporting? It’s important at any time and even more so in the run up to an election.


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