Word of the day

05/08/2022

Incession – movement onward or forward; motion on foot; progress in walking; locomotion.


Sowell says

05/08/2022


Rural round-up

05/08/2022

Foot-and-mouth – the stock disease that could inflict a huge economic cost on our economy if Biosecurity defences fail – Point of Order:

Ray Smith,  director-general  of  the  Ministry for Primary Industries,  sent  a  shiver  through  the  NZ  China  Summit in Auckland  when  he  warned  that  foot-and-mouth  disease  getting  into NZ   would  be  a  “scary”  and  a “gigantic thing”.

The  highly  contagious  disease has  been  sweeping  through Indonesia  and  since  it  was  first discovered  in  May  429,000 cases   have  been  identified    through  24   provinces  including Bali,  a  popular  holiday  destination  for many  New  Zealanders.

Indonesia  is  struggling  to  bring the  disease under  control, underlining  what  a problem  it  could  be  for NZ’s  main  export  industries.

The disease, which could cost the country billions of dollars and more than 100,000 jobs if it ran rampant among our livestock, is causing major concern in South Asia. After  the disease was discovered in Bali fragments of the virus that cause the disease have also been found in meat products entering Australia from Indonesia, creating fresh concerns about the possibility of it arriving in New Zealand.  . . . 

Red meat sector defies global supply chain issues :

New Zealand exported red meat worth $1.1 billion during June despite the ongoing global supply chain issues affecting sheepmeat and beef volumes, according to an analysis by the Meat Industry Association (MIA).

The 15 per cent increase in value compared to June 2021 was largely driven by beef exports, particularly to China. Although the total volume of beef exports was down seven per cent, the overall value was up 23 per cent to $504 million. The value of beef exports to China was up 39 per cent to $217m.

The overall volume of sheepmeat exported was largely unchanged compared to last June, at 32,470 tonnes, with value up 15 per cent to $398m. Volumes of chilled sheepmeat exports, however, continued to drop, down 31 per cent to 2,253 tonnes.

Sheepmeat exports to China saw a drop in both volume (21 per cent) and value (31 per cent) compared to the same period last year, but this was offset for by increases in exports to other major sheepmeat markets. . . 

Wool supply concern prompts Bremworth to consider contracting farmers –  Sally Murphy:

Carpet company Bremworth is looking at the option of providing farmers with long-term contracts to secure supply.

Strong wool prices have been subdued for years now – which has led many farmers to leave their wool in their sheds in the hope they will be able to get better prices in the future.

Bremworth chief executive Greg Smith said it has been a challenging time for farmers so the company wanted to provide more security to them while ensuring a secure supply of wool.

“The foundation of our businesses is 100 percent strong wool and at the moment, the strong wool industry is under enormous pressure because of prices. It’s a commodity which is not being valued as much as it has been in the past. . . 

Farmers, there’s plenty to celebrate:

“Despite yesterday’s Federated Farmers Confidence Survey results, there are many positives for the agricultural and horticultural sectors right now,” says National’s Agriculture Spokesperson Barbara Kuriger.

The survey conducted last month showed production expectations have dropped into negative territory for the first time since its inception in 2009.

Of the 1200 surveyed, 47% consider current economic conditions to be bad — down 55.6 points since January, when a net 7.8% considered conditions to be good. A net 80% expect general economic conditions to get worse — up 16.9 points for the same period.

“These results are mood driven by what is coming at them driven by other factors outside their control like the Government’s fiscal policy. But the biggest culprit is compliance, mounting regulation, economic, business, environment costs and debt. . . 

Wool stations put a new spin on teaching children :

A project that educates children about wool will see its 25,000th student pass through its wool sheds this month.

As part of the Wool in Schools programme, schools can request one of two 20-foot shipping containers that have been converted into wool sheds to visit, so primary students can learn about wool and how it is used.

The half-hour experience involves interactive stations where children learn about wool processes and the different uses and benefits of wool and can even have a go at weaving on a mini loom.

The programme is run by the Campaign for Wool NZ, which aims to raise awareness about the uses and benefits of wool. . . 

NZ Winegrowers announce Fellows for 2022 :

The New Zealand wine industry has recognised the service and dedication of industry icons Dominic Pecchenino, Jim and Rose Delegat, Clive Paton and Phyll Pattie, and Chris Howell, by inducting them as Fellows of New Zealand Winegrowers.

The Fellows award recognises individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to the New Zealand wine industry.

“The Roll of Fellows honours the modern pioneers of the New Zealand wine industry. We wholeheartedly thank Dominic, Jim, Rose, Clive, Phyll and Chris for their years of service, and their role in shaping the New Zealand wine industry to be what it is today,” says Clive Jones, Chair of New Zealand Winegrowers.

All the 2022 Fellows have worked over many decades for the “betterment of the wine industry,” says Clive. “The work of these individuals enables a small industry like ours to punch above our weight on the world stage, and we thank them for their efforts.” . . 


From the Ground Up – Delwyn Tuanui Chatham Island Food Co

05/08/2022

Young Country has launched a Podcast series From the Ground Up.

Welcome to From the Ground Up, a podcast brought to you by Young Country. This is a podcast for the go getters, the big dreamers, the innovators of the primary sector. I’m your host Rebecca Greaves, and we’re taking a closer look at people in the primary industries who have dared to think big, push the limits and give it a go in business. We’ll be asking them what the catalyst was to take the plunge and make a change. We find out how they got to where they are now, what they’ve learned along the way, and what their advice is to other aspiring agri-innovators. So, settle in and listen up as we serve you a healthy dose of inspiration, motivation, and maybe even challenge your thinking a little.

The first features Delwyn Tuanui and the Chatham Island Food Company:

Rebecca catches up with Delwyn Tuanui from The Chatham Island Food Co and learns about how he chased his dreams from the ground up.

Running around Melbourne in his early 20s with a chilly bin full of Chatham Island blue cod, knocking on the doors of the city’s top chefs, Delwyn Tuanui knew he had a special product.

Social media handles and and website links to check out Chatham Island Food Co for yourself:- Instagram handle @chathamisfoodco- Facebook account @ChathamIslandFoodCo Website: Chatham Island Food Co | Ocean to your Door – Chatham Island Food Company http://www.chathamislandfood.com#fromthegroundup #agriinnovators #primaryindustries #nzfarming #nzfishing #youngcountry #ruralchat #agchatnz

 


Planting seeds of division and dissent

05/08/2022

Labour and the Green party have voted to undermine democracy:

A bill allowing Ngāi Tahu to appoint two voting councillors to the Canterbury Regional Council was passed tonight with fractious debate in Parliament about whether it will diminish or enhance democracy and whether other councils will follow suit. . . 

If other councils stand up for the principle of equal representation with one person, one vote they won’t follow suit. But now a precedent has been set, they might not care about that, at least until there’s a change of government.

National’s Paul Goldsmith said National would repeal the law if it became the Government because it did not uphold equal voting rights for all New Zealanders and did not provide electoral accountability. He questioned the mandate for the bill.

“It is our view on this side of the House that the Treaty of Waitangi does not trump democracy and the country has not decided that,” he said.

It was a divisive bill that was pitting one group of New Zealanders against others.

“Ngāi Tahu get to appoint those two councillors forever and a day. They cannot be thrown out. There is no direct accountability. It astounds me that I’m having to make this argument.”

Goldsmith rejected a suggestion that the bill had its roots in a similar move National had made in Government in 2010 when it replaced the Canterbury Regional Council with commissioners, including two Ngāi Tahu commissioners.

It was a temporary appointment of commissioners when democratic elections had been halted and was different to permanent unelected councillors.

Ironically Labour and the Greens were very critical of the then-government appointing commissioners.

“It will set a precedent. There is no question about that across local government. I can’t how you could say this is modern expression of the treaty but it only applies to Canterbury.

“I am sure there will be many other councils to which this logic will flow to, and then potentially to central government.” . . 

Reading the transcript of the debate and trying to understand the arguments in favour of the Bill and the redefining of democracy brings to mind Through the Looking Glass:

“When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’ ’

The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.”

Point of Order quotes some of the speeches in favour of the Bill and concludes:

. . . But if adding two additional representatives strengthens democracy, then it is reasonable to suppose that adding three representatives would strengthen it further  – and four would make it even stronger.

Why not 20 more? Or 100?

We don’t have to be too sage to recognise the absurdity of that line of reasoning – or to condemn the outcome of the vote at the end of the debate.  

Labour’s reimagining and rewriting of the Treaty to give people of Maori descent and Iwi rights and power not available to other citizens undermines the democratic principles which treat us all as equal under the law, giving us one vote each and the right to vote against those people we don’t want governing us.

New Zealand is a young country but one of the oldest democracies.

This Act replaces democracy by planting the seeds of division and dissent.


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