Sowell says

06/06/2022


Rural round-up

06/06/2022

Rural water schemes should remain in private ownershi – working gorup  – Russell Palmer:

Privately owned rural water supplies should be able to keep managing themselves, rather than handing over to the Three Waters entities, a working group has recommended.

By 2028, rural suppliers will be required to abide by the stronger standards being brought in by the water regulator set up in March last year, Taumata Arowai.

The Rural Supplies Technical working group was set up by the government to advise on how the water system reforms would handle rural supply schemes, and has made 30 recommendations.

Privately owned rural suppliers number in the tens of thousands, and the group urged the government to allow these to continue under their current management. . . 

Ikea’s owners buying 1118ha for forestry – Sally Rae:

Companies associated with Ingka Group, the largest franchisee of Ikea stores internationally, have received consent to buy more sheep and beef farming land in the South to convert to forestry.

Yesterday, the Overseas Investment Office released its April decisions, including a successful application by Ingka Investments Forest Assets NZ and Ingka Investments Management NZ, from the Netherlands, to acquire about 1118ha of land on Koneburn Rd at Waimumu.

The applicants were owned by Ingka Investments B.V., the investment arm of Ingka Group, one of 12 different groups of companies that own the Swedish furniture and homeware giant.

In a statement, the company stressed the property — like its other two New Zealand acquisitions — would be planted in plantation forestry, not used for carbon farming. . . 

The fight against Mycoplasma bovis – Sarah Robson:

No other country has done it before, but New Zealand is on the brink of eradicating the cattle disease mycoplasma bovis. It’s come at a heavy emotional and financial cost to farmers – what lessons can be learned?

The first day of winter is a big day in the dairy farming calendar: moving day.

1 June is when dairy farmers around the country move thousands of cows to new pasture for winter grazing or new sharemilking contracts.

But unlike the past few years, the threat of mycoplasma bovis won’t be looming so large, with just one farm – a large beef feedlot near Ashburton – still infected with the disease. . . . 

NAIT reconsiders operational strategy to accommodate smaller rise in levies:

The National Animal Identification and Tracing scheme, NAIT Limited, ran a public consultation with levy payers and collection agents between 21 January and 25 February 2022. A proposal was put forward to increase the tag levy from $0.90 to $1.35 and the slaughter levy from $0.50 to $1.77, to enable NAIT Limited to deliver a traceability system that is easy to use, fit for purpose, and that will perform in the event of a disease outbreak. The proposal included an increase in Crown and Deer industry funding.

A total of 147 submissions were received from individual farmers/farming operations, primary sector groups, shareholders, funders, OSPRI committees and collection agents. Submissions ranged in sentiment towards the proposal, were complex in nature, and required extensive analysis and discussions to make decisions on the outcome. For this reason, the Board of NAIT Limited decided, in March, to defer any decision on NAIT Levies to allow for a comprehensive review of feedback.

On 19 May 2022 the Board of NAIT Limited decided to revise their proposed operational strategy under a reduced funding package with an emphasis on delivering the core capabilities of a fit-for-purpose traceability system that performs in the event of a disease outbreak. The revised strategy will focus on delivering the core capabilities in the immediate term, with a staged approach to delivery of additional services that NAIT Limited believe will be important to optimise the animal traceability system in New Zealand. Under this reduced funding package, NAIT Limited has adjusted the proposed levies, whilst maintaining the 35/65% Crown/Industry Split. . . 

Rural health representatives join new network:

The way rural health is represented is set to change with the establishment of a new collective.

From 28 June, the Rural General Practice Network will transition to a new collective organisation called Hauora Taiwhenua Rural Health Network.

It incorporates nine different organisations, including Rural Nurses NZ and The Rural Midwifery and Maternity Service.

Network chief executive Grant Davidson said the collective organisation will help create a united and trusted voice for rural health. . . 

218 of Aotearoa’s best foods receive medals in 2022 Outstanding NZ Food Producer Awards:

In what has been hailed as ‘the most exciting year of the Awards to date’ 218 medal winners have been recognised this year’s Outstanding NZ Food Producer Awards.

Winners span the length of Aotearoa from Northland to Southland and its breadth, from the West Coast over to the Chatham Islands. Additionally they represent a vast range of locally harvest, grown and made foods including mushrooms, meat, preserves, drinks, ice cream and sweets. Results follow two days of judging at Homeland in Auckland earlier in May.

Seventy-one percent of all of the more than 300 entries received an accolade with 78 Gold Medals, 86 Silver Medals and 56 Bronze Medals awarded.

Reflecting on this year’s medal-winners, Head Judge Lauraine Jacobs said; “2022 has been the most exciting year for the Awards to date. Each year has seen not only growth in the number of entries, but the quality of the food products continues to rise and rise in every category. . . 


Chesterton quotes

06/06/2022


11/12

06/06/2022

11/12 in Pew’s international affairs quiz.

Analysis of the poll makes interesting reading:

. . .On average, Americans give more correct than incorrect answers to the 12 questions in the study. The mean number of correct answers is 6.3, while the median is 7. But the survey finds that levels of international knowledge vary based on who is answering. Americans with more education tend to score higher, for example, than those with less formal education. Men also tend to get more questions correct than women. Older Americans and those who are more interested in foreign policy also tend to perform better.

Political party groups are roughly similar in their overall levels of international knowledge, although conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats tend to score higher on the scale than do their more moderate counterparts. . . 

Hat tip: Kiwiblog


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