Word of the day

09/05/2022

Purlicue – the fleshy part of the hand that appears between an extended forefinger and thumb.


Sowell says

09/05/2022


Rural round-up

09/05/2022

Mycolplasma bovis isolated to just one farm :

The world-first attempt to eradicate the disease, which can cause lameness, mastitis and abortions in cows, began after it was first detected in a South Canterbury farm in 2017.

Since then, the disease has been confirmed and cleared from 271 properties, with more than 176,000 cattle culled.

Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor said no working farms we currently infected – the lone property was a large beef-feed lot, and work to clear it will begin later this year.

He marked the milestone as he announced $110.9m funding for biosecurity efforts. . . 

Kiwis endangered by unlicenced occupations – Roger Partridge:

They may not know it, but unsuspecting Kiwis will soon be protected from unregistered log traders and forestry advisers. What a relief that should be.

The Shane Jones-sponsored Forests (Regulation of Log Traders and Forestry Advisers) Amendment Act was introduced under urgency in the midst of the pandemic in May 2020. Forced along by Jones’s fanciful election-year plans to boost employment in his Northland electorate, the Bill passed into law in August that year.

Jones is long gone from Parliament. But in the intervening two years, the Ministry for Primary Industries has been busily consulting with the forestry industry on a suitable registration regime.

And well they might. Even though the Ministry’s Regulatory Impact Statement could not point to any quantitative evidence of benefits from the proposed licensing regime, tasks as important as regulating log traders should not be rushed. . . 

Saffron grower says industry growth necessary to meet consumer demand – Sally Murphy:

A Southland saffron grower says yields are slightly down this year but the quality of the spice is very high due to dry conditions.

The spice is the red stigma of a small purple flower Crocus sativus and can set you back anywhere from $20 – to $50 a gram.

Kiwi Saffron grows the spice organically across three hectares in Garston, Southland.

Owner Jo Daley said weather conditions had led to an enjoyable harvest this season and they should wrap up in the next week or so. . . 

Geoff Reid poked the bear – Kathryn Wright:

Geoff Reid NZ poked the bear

If you know me, you probably know that I don’t like to say much on social media. And I certainly don’t get involved in online arguments. But when I have something to say, it’s probably important and it’s probably going to be long. The longer it percolates in my mind, the more I will have to say.

This is why, when environmental activist Geoff Reid posted his latest photos in an attempt to shame a Southland farmer that was simply doing his job, I had had enough. I have known about this person for a while – spoken about in both professional and private capacity. I considered sending the post to him privately but no, I wanted others to see the harm this man (and others like him) create. I will include the post below this. Rural people are my heart, and Geoff Reid is hurting them. 

Geoff Reid poked the bear.  . . 

Dairy prices fall sharply but farmers will do nicely thank you from this season’s payout and Synlait has strong half-year – Point of Order:

Only  two  months  ago  Radio NZ  was  airing  a  report “Why  are global dairy  prices  so high?”  Now, the  story  is  rather  different  after  two sharp  falls  at  Fonterra’s  fortnightly  global dairy  auctions,  and  the  pundits   are  pondering  what  has  happened.

But  NZ’s  dairy farmers  can still rest  easy  that  this  season’s  payout  will be  the  highest in Fonterra’s  history.

The  latest fall this  week was  foreshadowed  in  a  report  by ANZ  agri-economist  Susan Kilsby  on commodities. She  noted  dairy prices fell 4% month-on-month in April, driven primarily by lower prices for whole milk powder which is highly influenced by demand from China.

Kilsby  went  on to  point  out market sentiment had deteriorated as the lockdowns in Shanghai and Beijing impact consumer buying opportunities. . . 

Biosecurity funding increase a sensible move :

An $111 million injection for biosecurity in the May Budget is a pragmatic acknowledgement of how vital it is to our economy we stop pest organisms at our borders, Federated Farmers says.

“This extra money shows an appreciation by the government pest incursions can wreak havoc in our primary industries, New Zealand’s powerhouse for export earnings,” Federated Farmers Arable Chair and plant biosecurity spokesperson Colin Hurst said.

“Plenty of Budget rounds go by without any bolstering of funding for biosecurity so we congratulate the government for making this a priority.”

The funding announcement comes on the same day that we mark the fourth anniversary of New Zealand’s world-first attempt to eradicate the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis – indeed the $110.9m in the Budget includes $68 million over the coming year to continue momentum on the M. bovis programme. . . 


Black Heels & Tractor Wheels – Amber Forrest

09/05/2022

Black Heels and Tractor Wheels Podcasts are a Rural Women NZ initiative in which they share stories from a range of women around New Zealand.

Today’s guest is our 2021 Supreme Winner at the NZI Rural Women NZ Business Awards, Amber Forrest.
Amber is based in Wairoa and provides the only full-time beauty therapy clinic with fully qualified staff in the region, a salon called BeautyAntix.
Amber has built an award-winning business which is immersed in the diversity of its clientele and community. It provides a wide range of expert, professional treatments and provides a career path for young women, particularly Māori, through a nationally recognised Beauty and Wellness Training facility.
The Beauty Antix motto is Exceeding Expectation with Expertise. It is an environment that is open, inclusive, and respectful to all customers and serves its community in a uniquely holistic way 

 

 


Govt doesn’t understand ETS

09/05/2022

Environment Minister has announced yet another scheme that will make no difference to the country’s emissions:

The Taxpayers’ Union is slamming Climate Change Minister James Shaw’s announcement that the Government is to spend $10 million of taxpayer money to remove coal boilers in New Zealand schools based on a false claim that it will “reduce emissions”.

Reacting to the announcement, Jordan Williams, a spokesman for the Union, explains:

“James Shaw is, yet again, failing to follow the advice of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change by trying to tinker with emissions already covered by the Emissions Trading Scheme.”

“Mr Shaw claims that this spend will ‘reduce’ emissions by 36,000 tonnes over ten years. That means he’s paying $278 per tonne vs the $76.50 it would cost at the current ETS price.”

“But it’s even worse than inefficient. Because coal burners are already covered by the ETS, the emissions are simply freed up to go elsewhere because the ETS runs on a ‘cap and trade’ principle.”

“When Mr Shaw says that the 36,000 tonnes is the ‘same as taking 1400 cars off the road’, he is just plain wrong. In fact, this announcement is the same as putting 1400 cars onto the road – the government’s spend simply results in a waterbed effect whereby the emissions are simply shifted.”

“It’s time climate change advocates stated calling out James Shaw’s fibs when he says that spending like this is a ‘a win for the climate’. The real cost of spending like this is the projects the money could have been spent on to actually reduce emissions – either by purchasing ETS credits to take them out of the market, or on projects to reduce emissions in sectors outside the ETS.”

“James Shaw’s false claims that his measures reduce emissions, when he knows very well they don’t, are the sort of environmental and financial trickery that give politicians a bad name.”

“Reducing coal burners might have benefits for air quality and health – but the claim that it helps the climate or reduces overall New Zealand emissions just is not true.”

It also shows the government doesn’t understand the ETS and the waterbed effect.

Removing emissions from coal burners doesn’t reduce emissions, it frees them to go somewhere else.

Just like the ute tax, it’s an exercise in virtue signalling futility and, like so much else this government does, it’s spending money that could be far better spent where it could do some good.


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