Word of the day

28/11/2021

Zoilist – an imitator of Zoilus; one who practises Zoilism; a carping or nagging critic; one who makes bitter, carping, and belittling critical judgments; a rude, nasty, or dishonest critic who enjoys finding faults in others.


Milne muses

28/11/2021


Rural round-up

28/11/2021

Inflation stalks NZ agriculture – Hugh Stringleman:

The inflationary thief is active in New Zealand and it is not clear whether it will be transitory or more persistent, independent economist Cameron Bagrie says.

The Reserve Bank said inflation is 4.9% currently and expected to rise to 5.7% in the first quarter of next year and it has assessed its presence as “somewhat transitory”.

After the sharp peak, the bank expects that it will take until 2024 to return to the 2% target zone.

But the economic commentators are having a bob each way. . . 

WTO trade ministers must seize agricultural subsidy reform opportunity :

Ahead of the WTO’s 12th Ministerial Conference from 30 November – 3 December, the Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand (DCANZ) is strongly supporting calls for a meaningful outcome on agricultural subsidies reform.

“Agricultural domestic support reform is the most urgent agricultural trade policy issue needing to be progressed multilateral,” says DCANZ Executive Director Kimberly Crewther. “An ambitious outcome would unlock major benefits for global agricultural trade.”

Domestic support subsidies are a major source of distortion and price volatility in agricultural markets. They lock in unsustainable food production systems, create significant disadvantages and inequities for unsubsidised producers, and cause a raft of negative environmental impacts through inefficient use of natural resources.

Crewther says domestic support has fallen behind the other key areas of the WTO’s agricultural negotiations and an outcome is long overdue. . . 

Deck the hay bales Southland farmers get behind Christmas competition :

Southland farmers are hoping to spread some Christmas cheer by creating sculptures such as hay bale reindeer and fertiliser tank Christmas trees on their farms.

Thriving Southland, which represents 30 catchment groups, has launched a competition calling on its farmers to create a festive themed sculpture.

Spokeswoman Rachel Holder said despite only starting a couple of days ago people are getting really excited about the competition.

“One of the catchment groups came up with the idea to inject some wellness into our communities and to boost morale because it’s been a really tough spring – there has been a lot of rain. . . 

Highly visible Queenstown property protected from development :

A highly visible piece of Kawarau Falls Station is now protected from development, following a decision by the owners, the Mee family, to place a QEII covenant on 170 hectares of the property.

The covenanted land is located across the Kawarau River from Queenstown Airport, north of the Remarkables Ski Area access road.

This follows an announcement last year that 900 ha of the neighbouring property, Remarkables Station, has been covenanted and will be gifted to QEII. While the Mee property will remain in family ownership, the landscape will be protected from development in the same way that Remarkables Station is.

Kawarau Falls Station director Mike Mee said the decision to covenant the areas was “the right thing to do” and he hoped it would inspire others in the region to consider legal protection as they look to the future. . . 

Consultation opens for registration of forestry advisers and log traders :

Key players in the forestry industry are encouraged to have their say on the design of a new registration system for log traders and forestry advisors with consultation opening today.

Legislation introduced in 2020 aims to raise professional standards across the forestry supply chain by requiring forestry advisers and log traders to register.

Te Uru Rākau – New Zealand Forest Service’s Director Forestry and Land Management Oliver Hendrickson says the system will provide assurances for anyone dealing with registered forestry advisers that they are receiving expert and impartial advice from people with the right knowledge and experience.

“These changes will also support a more open marketplace for the large number of new forest owners bringing their timber to the market for the first time. They also increase investor confidence in commercial forestry, support long term investment, and meet the broader objectives for land management and climate change. . . 

Farming robot kills 100,000 weeds per hour with lasers – Kristin Houser:

Carbon Robotics has unveiled the third-generation of its Autonomous Weeder, a smart farming robot that identifies weeds and then destroys them with high-power lasers.

The weedkiller challenge: Weeds compete with plants for space, sunlight, and soil nutrients. They can also make it easier for insect pests to harm crops, so weed control is a top concern for farmers.

Chemical herbicides can kill the pesky plants, but they can also contaminate water and affect soil health. Weeds can be pulled out by hand, but it’s unpleasant work, and labor shortages are already a huge problem in the agriculture industry.

“It’s harder to find people to do that work every single year,” vegetable farmer Shay Myers told the Seattle Times. . . 

 


Maya muses

28/11/2021


Sunday soapbox

28/11/2021

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse but not to abuse.

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader. – John Quincy Adams


%d bloggers like this: