Word of the day

23/11/2021

Bespurtle – to  bespatter; asperse, befoul.


Thatcher thinks

23/11/2021


Rural round-up

23/11/2021

Farmers struggling as MIQ system causes shortage of experienced workers :

A Waikato agricultural contractor is warning there could be an accident if the serious shortage of skilled machinery operators is not sorted.

It has been a long-standing concern within the sector as overseas operators struggle to access Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ).

Brook Nettleton from Bluegrass Contracting in Matamata said it was getting way past a joke, with efforts to get in more overseas workers failing.

He said there could be serious consequences if things did not change. . . 

The problem with promises at COP26 – Jacqueline Rowarth:

The problem with COP26 is not the promises that were made amongst the 30,000 people attending, but the reality of how the promises can be achieved, Dr Jacqueline Rowarth writes.

Greta Thunberg and other sceptics may well have been right when they predicted that COP26 would be just another expensive (in dollars and greenhouse gases) talkfest.

The problem is not the promises that were made amongst the 30,000 people attending, but the reality of how the promises can be achieved.

Politics and diplomacy were to the fore and the people making the promises did their best to be equitable and reasonable. . . 

Forest Owners says lessons for New Zealand in UN wood-based products report :

The Forest Owners Association says the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation has laid down a blueprint for the New Zealand forest and wood industry, with the release of ‘Forest Products in the Global Economy’, as part of the COP26 meeting and events in Glasgow.

The New Zealand Forest Owners Association Chief Executive, and former Chair of the UN Advisory Committee on Sustainable Forest Industries, David Rhodes, says while trees are best known here for their ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere, the future of forest products, as a replacement for petrochemical sourced materials, is equally important.

“This just released FAO Report details what can be done with both timber itself, and what can be achieved as well using wood materials.”

“Much of it is already well proven technology. What has been lacking is the realisation of the dreadful consequences on the environment if we continue to use vast volumes of fossil fuels, steel, concrete and plastics.” . . 

Farmers get down to bare basics to aid mental health charity – Katie Doyle:

A group of North Island farmers are stripping down to their birthday suits – all in the name of rural wellbeing.

The Ngarua Young Farmers club has produced a 2022 calendar featuring farmers in the nude, with the profits to be donated to an organisation called Will to Live.

Will to Live works to raise awareness about mental health in rural communities, and it offers three free private counselling sessions for farmers.

Brooke Matthews from Ngarua Young Farmers said her group offers a strong support system for its members, but some farmers are not as lucky. . . 

National welcomes use of genetic technology research in conservation :

The National Party supports research into genetic technologies with the possibility of it playing a key role in New Zealand reaching its Predator Free 2050 goal, says National’s Conservation spokesperson Jacqui Dean.

“When National introduced the Predator Free initiative back in 2016, we did so with great ambition to have every part of New Zealand completely free of rats, stoats and possums by 2050.

“It was a move we made to protect New Zealand’s native birds and other species, along with the rest of our environment.

“Introduced pests threaten our economy and primary sector, with a total economic cost of around $3.3 billion a year.  . . 

Taking Stock: A good stock agent is not just about the quick quips – Samantha Townsend:

Ask anyone about the Collie Hotel’s social media video on stock and station agents and they will tell you it’s on the money.

The hotel’s owner Tom Hancock is captured on the phone leaning against the wall, leaning on the table and leaning on the fence while striking a deal.

But it poses the serious question what makes a good stock and station agent, who are certainly a breed of their own.

They are always on call and like the video their phone is glued to their cheek. They have their finger on the pulse and have to be quick thinking when markets pivot and rain falls. And they are often the first phone call before the accountant when it comes to big investments. . . 


Sowell says

23/11/2021


Closed and opaque

23/11/2021

Remember the government’s pledge to be open and transparent?

Waitaki MP Jacqui Dean posted on Facebook:

In my office we call this The Wall of Openness and Transparency.

All of these documents come from the Department of Conservation and relate to Jobs For Nature. As you can see the Government aren’t shy about redacting information from my Official Information Act requests.

 

Jobs for Nature is funded from taxes. The Opposition and the public have the right to know if those funds are being spent wisely and well.

This amount of redacted information begs the question, what is the government hiding and why?

The answer to a second question – what happened to being open and transparent? – is much clearer than the government: it’s reversed its pledge to being closed and opaque.


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