Give Us Hope

25/10/2021

This is the third time I’ve posted this video.

The previous two are no longer available.


Word of the day

25/10/2021

Windling – a bundle of straw bound together; that which is torn down by the wind; a branch blown down by the wind.


Sowell says

25/10/2021


Rural round-up

25/10/2021

Focus on discerning consumers – Neal Wallace & Colin Williscroft:

An increasing number of meat and dairy exporters are targeting discerning consumers with products that meet their environmental and animal welfare expectations. 

First Light managing director Gerard Hickey says suppliers of its beef and venison have to meet certain provenance, welfare and market standards that consumers are prepared to pay a premium for.

Silver Fern Farms’ Plate to Pasture brand underpins its production values, but will this year launch net carbon zero beef into the US and is seeking suppliers to commit to regenerative agriculture, all of which will pay premium prices.

Chief executive Simon Limmer says it has 3500 suppliers certified to NZ Farm Assurance Plan (NZFAP) programme, representing 94% of sheepmeat and 58% of beef supply. . .

Condition major profit driver – Russell Priest:

Ewe body condition is the most powerful profit driver in a sheep production system and unlike many objective measurements taken on sheep is cheap to assess, requiring only a farmer’s valuable time.

That’s the message delivered by former BakerAg consultant and now full-time farmer Sully Alsop at a Beef + Lamb NZ Farming for Profit seminar held in Manawatu recently.

It influences the three main profit drivers – kilograms of lamb weaned/ha, weaning weight/lamb and number of lambs weaned/ ha.

“If there is one thing that drives sheep production more than anything else it is ewe condition,” Sully said. . .

What is wool’s future in New Zealand? – Dorian Garrick:

Dorian Garrick scopes the range of options for wool off the typical New Zealand sheep farm.

Early in my career, a typical family sheep and beef farm in New Zealand earnt roughly one-third of its income from wool, roughly one-third from sheep meat, and the rest from cattle. 

The woolshed was a stimulating workplace at shearing time, with the hard-working team, the competitive environment, and the high value of the product being harvested. At that time, those few individuals that had knowledge and experience with wool classing were held in high regard. 

The approaches used to improve reproductive performance and lamb growth rates by selection were based on considerable scientific efforts. They were in concert with the onfarm activities of the enlightened ram breeders and the interest of industry to support activities such as Sheep Improvement Limited (SIL) and its predecessors. . .

Dr Ron Beatson wins the Morton Coutts Award

Plant & Food Research scientist Dr Ron Beatson has been awarded the Morton Coutts Trophy.

The award was presented at the Brewers Guild of New Zealand 2021 New Zealand Beer Awards in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the New Zealand hops industry.

Beatson has led the research and development of hop breeding and genetics for 38 years at Plant & Food Research.

Based at the Motueka Research Centre, he recently celebrated his 50th anniversary as a Plant & Food Research scientist. . . 

ASB bets Fonterra will pay farmers a record milk price this season – Desire Juarez:

ASB hiked its expectations for Fonterra’s milk price to farmers to the top of the co-operative’s range, saying declining milk production will push payments to a record high this season.

ASB economist Nat Keall lifted his forecast for Fonterra’s farmgate milk price this season by 55 cents to $8.75 per kilogram of milk solids. That’s at the top of Fonterra’s forecast for between $7.25 per kgMS and $8.75 per kgMS, and would surpass the previous record of $8.40 per kgMS paid in the 2013/14 season.

Keall took heart from the latest global dairy trade (GDT) auction which showed whole milk powder, which has the most impact on what farmers are paid, continued to be in demand, with prices for future contracts lifting as production looks set to fall this season.

“GDT events over the first half of spring have shown no sign of demand softening and, with supply continuing to look tight, we’re comfortable making a sizeable upward revision,” Keall said in a note. “A record farmgate milk price for the season is very much live.” . . 

 

Productivity and lifestyle in a superb coastal setting :

A picturesque coastal sheep and beef farm has gone up for sale in North Canterbury offering an enticing blend of productivity and lifestyle plus options to further grow production.

Located on Gore Bay Road, about four kilometres south of Cheviot in rural Hurunui, the approximately 590-hectare hill country farm is well subdivided for ease of management, with productivity underpinned by good access and infrastructure.

The land offers a favourable balance of aspect and is well-regarded, healthy stock country particularly suitable for fine wool production. . .


Thatcher thinks

25/10/2021


Just another holiday?

25/10/2021

Will anyone who doesn’t have to work today, remember why?

Labour Day commemorates the struggle for an eight-hour working day. New Zealand workers were among the first in the world to claim this right when, in 1840, the carpenter Samuel Parnell won an eight-hour day in Wellington. Labour Day was first celebrated in New Zealand on 28 October 1890, when several thousand trade union members and supporters attended parades in the main centres. Government employees were given the day off to attend the parades and many businesses closed for at least part of the day. . . 

Early Labour Day parades drew huge crowds in places such as Palmerston North and Napier as well as in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. Unionists and supporters marched behind colourful banners and ornate floats, and the parades were followed by popular picnics and sports events. . .

What the Liberals did do was make Labour Day a holiday. The Labour Day Act of 1899 created a statutory public holiday on the second Wednesday in October, first celebrated in 1900. The holiday was ‘Mondayised’ in 1910, and since then it has been held on the fourth Monday in October. . .

Although unionists and their supporters continued to hold popular gatherings and sports events, by the 1920s Labour Day had begun to decline as a public spectacle. For most New Zealanders, it was now just another holiday.

Statutory holiday or not, many people will be working – health professionals, police, supermarket and other shop staff, journalists and others in the media, people in hospitality and on farms. . .

Then there’s all the unpaid work done by people caring for their families and friends and in the community.

And this year for many it’s not just another holiday, it’s just another day of lockdown.

For far too many of those this will be a day when they would be working if they could and, in spite of last week’s announcement of more support from the government, will be wondering if their businesses will survive until they can work again.


%d bloggers like this: