Rural round-up

Stop carbon farming! :

Beef+Lamb NZ says current Government policies will see too much carbon forestry planted and urgent change is needed.

Last week, Climate Change Minister James Shaw released a discussion paper aimed at helping shape NZ’s emissions reduction plan. BLNZ says the paper contains a slight shift in how the Government is talking about the role of carbon-only exotic forestry in addressing climate change.

“We welcome the Government’s recognition that fossil fuel emissions must be reduced, rather than continually offset,” says chief executive Sam McIvor.

“The discussion document indicates any decision on changing the ETS rules would come by the end of 2022. We’re concerned that’s not fast enough given the scale and pace of land conversion happening.” . .

Water entity concerns run deep – Andrew Hoggard:

Federated Farmers joins the many council-elected representatives and citizens up and down the country urging the Government to go back to the drawing board on reform of its three waters delivery.

It’s clear that billions of dollars of investment are needed to get drinking water, stormwater and sewerage infrastructure up to scratch. However, there are too many flaws and question marks over the proposed four new mega entities for the Government to just press ahead.

A range of deep concerns with the proposed model have been raised in the provinces, chief among them the risk rural voices and needs will be swamped in the enlarged set-ups. Right now we have a direct say in the appropriate level of investment and priorities for water infrastructure via our local council.

If our elected representatives don’t deliver, we can eject them at election time – and they know it. . . 

Farming the future – trading on animal welfare and emissions not tariffs – Hugh Campbell:

This week’s NZ-UK free trade agreement helps unveil what the future holds for New Zealand farming as the sector becomes increasingly diverse, in the final of our three-part series on rural politics

There is a lot of history to live up to in the current moment of farmer politics in New Zealand. Understanding the sheer scope and breadth of pastoral farming power through much of the 20th century provides the essential backdrop for understanding the current moment of farmer protests in 2021.

But we are in the midst of a massive transition away from a time in which pastoral farmers were in total control of their own futures and had unfettered access to the machinery of government. Farmers haven’t lost their power in New Zealand, but it is sometimes a bit opaque as to how that power is becoming re-aligned. . .

Alliance to announce rise in trading profit – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group will post an increased trading profit when it announces its full-year financial results later this year, chief executive David Surveyor says.

Last year, the company had an underlying profit of $27.4 million for the year ended September 30 which, when adjusted for one-off events (donning and doffing), brought it down to $7.5 million before tax.

Addressing a virtual supplier roadshow yesterday, Mr Surveyor said the issue all year was not about the ability to sell but about shipping product.

Supply chains had been ‘‘greatly disrupted’’ due to the Covid-19 pandemic, and global supply chain issues had become the new normal. . .

Wool overtaking synthetic for carpet – Shawn McAvinue:

The tide is turning for the sales of woollen carpet, a Southern retailer says.

A national roadshow about a proposed merger between Wools of New Zealand and Primary Wool Co-operative made its final stops in the South last week.

The companies have been getting New Zealand strong wool from its shareholding farmers made into carpet in Turkey, which had been on sale at Flooring Xtra shops in New Zealand for a couple of months.

Alexandra and Cromwell Flooring Xtra owner Paul Rillstone spoke at the roadshow stop in Lawrence. . .

WA’s Cara Peek named Rural Woman of the Year

Cara Peek, a Broome-based lawyer, social innovator and co-founder of Saltwater Country, has been named the 2020 AgriFutures Rural Women’s Award National Winner for her work in driving employment opportunities for First Nations people in remote Australia.

Cressida Cains, artisan cheesemaker and a passionate dairy industry advocate from New South Wales was announced as the award’s National Runner Up.

Due to COVID-19, the national Rural Women’s Award ceremony was postponed last year. . . 

 

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