Rural round-up

Simplistic water rules not usable – Jacqueline Rowarth:

What is simple is always wrong. What is not is unusable.

French philosopher and poet Paul Valery wrote those sentences in 1942. We should remember the words in our struggles to find a way forward for agriculture.

Around New Zealand the regional and local authorities are dealing with the National Policy Statements, particularly those for freshwater. The goal is to find an indicator of water quality and apply a regulation.

It is not an easy task. . .

Vets need dedicated MIQ spots now :

An acute shortage of vets could lead to animal welfare issues if the Government does not respond to the New Zealand Veterinary Association.”

National Agriculture spokesperson Barbara Kuriger says the association contacted her this week after months of lobbying the Government for managed isolation and quarantine spaces (MIQ) to get overseas vets into NZ.

“Earlier this year, MPI and Minister O’Connor advocated for 50 border exceptions for vets to enter the country.

“But these vets are unable to book spaces, in the lottery that is, this country’s MIQ system. . .

Hive to home: Comvita’s tough turnaround road – Nikki Mandow:

Over the past 18 months, our largest mānuka honey producer, Comvita, had to make some tough calls to turn around the business. But a hard-won strategy to control the whole supply chain – from hive to home – could end up being its secret weapon.

It all started in 1916 with a six-year-old boy called Claude Stratford keeping bees and making honey on his parents’ small South Island farm. He left school at 11, and started putting his bike on the Cook Strait ferry to take his honey to sell in Wellington.

He maybe didn’t know it, but he was running a one-kid, end-to-end supply chain management system.

Half a century later, in 1974, Stratford, then in his mid-60s, teamed up with Alan Bougen, a self-confessed hippy 40 years younger than himself. The pair founded a company, Comvita, based on selling natural health food products, mostly related to bees. There was mānuka honey, of course, but also bee pollen, honey vinegar, lozenges, and an elixir to help with coughs and sore throats. . .

Poultry farmers face added costs in effort to stamp out salmonella strain :

The Ministry for Primary Industries has introduced stricter controls for the poultry industry in a bid to control an outbreak of salmonella enteritidis.

The disease was first discovered in an Auckland hatchery in March – it’s since been found in 11 poultry operations.

Most infected flocks have been culled and only two farms remain actively infected – they can not sell product for human consumption.

The salmonella strain posses a health risk to humans, who can get sick from eating infected meat or eggs which haven’t been thoroughly cooked. . .

Cash injection for pines to natives forest conversion project:

The country’s largest ‘pine to natives’ forest conversion project has been given a $15,000 cash injection by a leading producer of radiata pine products. The initiative by Hawke’s Bay-based Forest Lifeforce Restoration Trust (FLRT) is converting the former Maungataniwha Pine Forest into 4,000 hectares of regenerating native forest and now has the financial backing of the Pan Pac Environmental Trust.

The land lies adjacent to the Maungataniwha Native Forest, a 6,120-hectare swathe of New Zealand bush straddling the ridge system between the Te Hoe and Waiau Rivers in northern Hawke’s Bay, bordered to the north by Te Urewera National Park and to the west by the Whirinaki Conservation Forest.

Eighty years ago, the land was covered in mature native forest full of mistletoe, kiwi, kokako and kaka. The mature podocarps were logged and in the 1980s some 4,000 hectares were clear-felled and burnt for the planting of pine trees. . .

 

New Zealand genetics company Tropical Dairy Group announces capital raise on catalist:

New Zealand dairy genetics company Tropical Dairy Group Limited (TDG) announced today a private offer on Catalist – a new stock exchange designed for small to medium enterprises (SMEs).

Seeking to raise $3 million from wholesale investors, TDG is the holding company and 100% owner of both Thermo Regulatory Genetics Limited and Dairy Solutionz (NZ) Limited, founded in 2018 and 2009 respectively.

The raise comes ahead of an intended public listing in early 2022 on the Catalist Public Market.

Focused on developing heat-tolerant cattle in tropical climates, TDG’s genetics are sold into markets throughout Asia, the USA and South America, improving animal welfare and helping the world’s hottest communities provide greater food and protein security. . .

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