Word of the day

22/07/2021

Tophaceous – pertaining to, or manifesting the features of, a toph or tophus; gritty; sandy; rough; stony.


Sowell says

22/07/2021


Rural round-up

22/07/2021

Groundswell staying mum on future – Gerald Piddock:

Groundswell will keep its word and take no further action until August 16 to give the Government time to respond to its concerns that its farming regulations are unworkable.

The protests on July 16 saw thousands of farmers and their vehicles head to 57 towns and cities across the country to protest policies around freshwater, climate change and biodiversity.

“There’s definitely nothing to add to the protest because we have to wait until August 16 and we’ve given the Government until then to make a response,” Groundswell co-founder Bryce McKenzie said.

“But we have got other irons in the fire. There are other subjects we will be commenting on or putting stuff out on for people to look at separate to the protest,” he said. . . 

Backlash over protest advice to staff – Sally Rae:

Farmer-owned co-operatives have come under fire from the farming community for telling staff they were not allowed to represent their company’s brand at last Friday’s Groundswell New Zealand protest.

Some farmers have indicated shifting their support from co-operatives that took such a stance ahead of the Howl of a Protest, which drew thousands of people from throughout the country.

Clarks Junction farmer Jim Macdonald wrote to Farmlands chairman Rob Hewett before the event saying he was concerned and angered by the decision, and urged a change of heart.

Staff were told if they wanted to support Groundswell the company asked that it was done independently of Farmlands “to protect the Farmlands brand”. It is understood some other rural companies made similar requests to staff. . . 

Farmstrong: discovering my own values :

High country sheep and beef farmer Hamish Murray spent a year on a Nuffield scholarship studying businesses with high-performance team cultures. What he discovered was that before you can work on your team, you need to work on yourself.

HAMISH Murray has an impressive CV. He’s played top-level sport, studied overseas and now works with a team of seven full-time staff, running Bluff Station in the Clarence River Valley. The diversified operation includes 5500 Merino ewes, 950 Angus and Hereford breeding cows and 750 beehives.

“I love the variety of farming. The particular valley and property where we are just gets into your blood. It’s isolated and beautiful. I love being outdoors with our animals, I’m happiest when I’m out riding a horse and shifting stock,” Murray said.

“I spent the earlier part of my life getting an education and learning to do things other than farming, but for me coming back to farming was about giving my children the opportunity to grow up the same way I had. . . 

https://twitter.com/AniekaNick/status/141775380919178445

Grain sense: couple develop on-farm distillery – Sally Rae:

Southland sheep and cropping farmers Rob and Toni Auld are in high spirits.

The entrepreneurial couple operate Auld Farm Distillery, believed to be the southernmost on-farm distillery in the world, on their 200ha Scotts Gap property.

Being primary producers, they were previously used to watching the produce they grew heading out the driveway never to be seen again.

Being able to grow the grain to produce their own whisky was “next-level cool”, Mr Auld said. . . 

The big picture with sheep – Keith Woodford:

The sheep-farming retreat will continue despite excellent meat prices, with carbon farming the mega-force.

In recent months, I have written four articles focusing on the sheep and beef industries across New Zealand. My main focus has been to identify the current situation and to document how the situation varies for different classes of land across the country. Here I return to the overall big question: what is the future of the sheep industry?

There are two parts to that question. The first is the market opportunities. The second is about competing land-uses. . . 

Market opportunities

Apart from some dry hill and high-country farms lying east of the South Island Main Divide, wool is largely irrelevant. Fine-wool merinos are big contributors on low rainfall South Island farms and I expect that to continue. But elsewhere, wool no longer makes a worthwhile contribution to farm income. We can always live in hope, but that is not the basis on which to make land-use decisions. . . 

Productive avocado orchard with commercially run tourist operation placed on the market for sale:

A productive avocado orchard in the heart of Northland’s premier avocado growing district has been placed on the market for sale – with capacity to substantially increase its production scale.

The 15-hectare property is located at Waiharara near 90-Mile Beach in the Far North – which is fast becoming a regional production hub for avocados due to its climate, contour, and free-draining soils.

Located some 40 kilometres north of Kaitaia, the generally rectangular-shaped orchard for sale at 101 Turk Valley Road features nine sheltered and contoured blocks – three of which are now in full production.

Production records from the orchard show that the orchard has been relatively consistent with 12,000 trays being averaged over the past four seasons. The mature trees are Hass on Zutano rootstock, while the younger trees are Hass on Dusa and Hass on Bounty clonal rootstocks. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

22/07/2021


Representing who?

22/07/2021

Police Minister Poto Williams is against the permanent arming of police.

I agree with her stance but not her reason:

. . .Williams told Newstalk ZB’s Mike Yardley this morning that she supported police officers being armed when they needed to be, but did not think it should extend to the permanent arming of the force.

This was because she had listened to overwhelming feedback from the Māori, Pacific Island and South Auckland communities who didn’t want it.

The communities she represented – Māori and Pacific – who were telling her “loud and clear” that the general arming of police and the Armed Response Teams (ARTs) were a real concern to them and had been distressed to learn armed police were routinely patrolling their streets, she said. . . 

The communities she represents? Shouldn’t that be her electorate and the police, first?:

In an interview with Newstalk ZB this morning Minister of Police Poto Williams made it crystal clear that despite being their Minister, the police and their safety are not a priority for her, Leader of the Opposition Judith Collins says.

“The interview was a train wreck from beginning to end and quite frankly it is time the Prime Minister steps in to replace her with someone who is capable of advocating for and caring about police officers.

“I have been Minister of Police and it was an absolute privilege to work with the people who risk their own safety to enforce the law and protect us all in this country. The police force deserves a Minister who does not look at them as if they are all violent racists.

“It is unforgivable that Minister Williams would not even condemn anarchist group People Against Prisons Aotearoa when read a statement that said they were committed to ‘disarming, defunding, and abolishing the bloodstained racist institution of the New Zealand Police’.

“Labour make the mistake of thinking they speak for all Māori and Pasifika people when they say they have listened to the ‘communities’. No ethnic group is a monolith and in my electorate of Papakura I am hearing that my multi-cultural constituents support police and want them to be able to sort out gang members.

“This cannot go on. Labour has to get real about crime and about empowering the police to do their job. This nonsense of making the police the ‘bad guys’ is creating a more tense and hostile environment which inevitably leads to more dangerous altercations. . . 

Empowering police doesn’t necessarily mean arming them all, but it ought to mean the Minister making them her priority.

Kerre McIvor asks who does Potu Williams actually represent?

. . . Police Minister Poto Williams, who was on with Mike Yardley this morning, says the people she represents are dead against routinely arming police.

We did ask for clarification from the Minister as to who exactly her people are.

She is a New Zealander of Cook Island descent, the MP for Christchurch East and the Police Minister.

However, in the interview, the people she says she represents appear to be exclusively Māori and Pacific Islanders from south Auckland.

Not Christchurch, not New Zealanders as a whole, and not the police.  . . 

Heather du Plessis Allan also says the Minister is supposed to be representing the police:

I feel for our country’s cops at the moment, especially after those train wreck comments by their Minister Poto Williams this morning.

My problem is not that she opposes the arming of frontline police, she’s entitled to her opinion. My problem is that she says her reason for that is because the communities she represents don’t want it.

I’m talking about the communities I represent which is Māori and Pasifika communities. What is she talking about? She’s the Police Minister.

If there is a group she is supposed to represent and have the back of it’s the police. She is the person who is supposed to go to the Finance Minister and the Prime Minister and argue for resources and funding to make sure cops can do their jobs.

And if there’s a second group she should be representing, it’s the people of Christchurch east who elected her. Who are a mix of ethnicities –  12 per cent Māori, 4 per cent Pasifika, 87 per cent Pakeha, 5 per cent Asian. But instead, she makes it sound like she’s the representative of South Auckland’s Māori and Pasifika communities. Christchurch East voters should be annoyed. . . 

Unless they’re standing as an independent, candidates for parliament represent parties when they’re campaigning.

Once they’re elected as electorate MPs their duty is to represent their electorate, albeit wearing their party’s colour.

If they become ministers they have a duty to represent and advocate for the organisations and people their portfolio covers.

What message is the minister sending to the people in her Christchurch East electorate and the police who are the people she is supposed to be representing?

How will police, which includes many Maori and Pasifika, be feeling, knowing their minister doesn’t have their backs?


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