Word of the day

14/07/2021

Abarticular – not affecting or connected to the joints; away from the joints; not articular.


Sowell says

14/07/2021


Rural round-up

14/07/2021

Farmer frustration is boiling over :

Federated Farmers President Andrew Hoggard says he’s not surprised frustration and anger about the deluge of new regulations and costs from central government is spilling over into protest meetings.

On Friday farmers in a number of districts around New Zealand are rounding up dog teams and firing up utes and tractors to head into their nearest town for peaceful protest rallies.

In his speech to the Federated Farmers National Council in Christchurch last week, Andrew referred to a “winter of discontent” in rural communities, with the so-called ute tax a straw that broke the camel’s back for many farming families.

The new “fee” on the farm vehicle work-horse to fund electric vehicle grants, when suitable EVs are not yet a realistic option for farmers, “has just highlighted in farmers’ minds that the Wellington Beltway thinkers just don’t get regional New Zealand“. . .

No workers, no growth! – Peter Burke:

Zespri chief executive Dan Mathieson says unless the kiwifruit industry gets more people to work in the sector, it may have to look at slowing down its speed of growth.

Matthieson told Hort News the biggest challenge for the industry is getting a good and consistent supply of people coming through the sector. Those who can help pick the fruit – as well as prepare the orchards for the next season’s crop. He adds the sector also want people to work through the post-harvest facilities to ensure that fruit is being managed well, to get it to market in the best condition.

Mathieson says New Zealanders currently make up about 55% of the kiwifruit sector’s workforce, while backpackers make up about 25% and RSE workers around 15%.

“We have a good mix, but we are certainly looking for more to supplement the migrant workers and the backpackers,” he told Hort News. . . 

Canterbury farmer’s only way out under threat – Sally Murphy:

A farmer in the Canterbury high country still cleaning up after last month’s flood is worried the bridge which connects them to the rest of the world could be washed away.

The heavy rain caused significant damage to Double Hill run road up the Rakaia Gorge leaving farmers isolated.

A four-wheel-drive track has since been cut on the road but a bridge near Redcliffs station is still surrounded by shingle.

Station farmer Ross Bowmar said he was still using a generator for power and had five kilometres of fencing to repair, but the bridge was his main concern. . . .

 

Farmer owned co-operatives need farmer-centered boards:

Former Ravensdown Board member Scott Gower is calling for farmers to step up and stay active in participating on boards of their co-operatives despite more demands being placed on farmers’ time.

Scott is a third-generation hill country sheep and beef farmer from Ohura near Taumarunui and retired from the Ravensdown Board last September after reaching the maximum term.

As an ownership structure, co-operatives contribute 18% of New Zealand’s GDP and one of the most important characteristics according to Scott is how they can take ‘the long view’ rather than seeking short-term commercial gain.

“The agsector is served by more co-operatives than most. Participation by working farmers is vitally important especially in the Board’s composition and determining its priorities. They can nominate candidates, they can run themselves and of course elect the directors that best represent how they think things should be governed,” Scott says. . .

Vegetables lead sharp rise in food prices:

The largest rise for vegetable prices in over four years pushed food prices up 1.4 percent during the June 2021 month, Stats NZ said today.

Vegetable prices rose 15 percent in June, mainly influenced by rising prices for tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, capsicum, and broccoli. After adjusting for seasonal effects, vegetable prices were up 8.5 percent.

“We typically see price rises for many vegetables in winter due to seasonal effects,” consumer prices manager Matthew Stansfield said.

“However, we are seeing larger rises than usual for this time of the year and for a greater number of vegetables.” . .

Agritech industry grew over 2020, report shows – Nona Pelletier:

The agritech industry is growing steadily, despite challenges posed by the pandemic.

The Technology Investment Network (TIN) report for 2020 indicates there was growth across all parts of the sector, including the number of start-ups, export revenue, spending on research and development, and investment across all business types.

The top 22 agritech companies generated $1.4 billion in revenue.

Most of the new early stage companies offered information and communication technology, with a growing number offering biotech products. . . .


Yes Sir Humphrey

14/07/2021


Govt destroys jobs

14/07/2021

How frustrating is this?

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) has shut down a West Coast goldmining exploration venture that was injecting $500,000 a year into the local economy and according to the miner had the potential to create 12 well-paid jobs.

Peter Morrison, who owns farms in Canterbury and on the West Coast, has invested about $2 million over the past year, looking for gold – and finding it – on a 500ha block he owns near Inangahua Junction.

Morrison was working under an exploration permit, employing three skilled operators and local contractors on the 1ha site to evaluate the potential for a full-scale alluvial mine.

“We applied a year ago for a mining permit but we’re still waiting … in the meantime we’ve been doing the feasibility work … trying to work out if it would be economic to go all in.”

A year to process a permit? Isn’t MBIE supposed to be encouraging business?

But after being told by MBIE he was breaching the exploration permit and threatened with massive fines, Morrison has been forced to pull the plug.

“This has been going on for months … I’ve had my lawyer look at it and he can’t see what this alleged breach is — all they say is that the hole’s too big,” Morrison said.

Neither of the two local councils have a problem.

The Buller District Council and West Coast Regional Council both said there were no issues with the land use and resource consents they issued for the site, and Morrison had paid the required surety bond.

But after more pressure from officials two weeks ago Morrison reluctantly laid off his three staff.

“I’m sorry to lose them, they were a very skilled team. I doubt I’ll get them back. And those were $100,000 a year jobs.”

Four MBIE officials had turned up twice in one week and been “very aggressive”, he said.

“They walked around looking grim and grilling my staff and saying it was pretty big for an exploration. But it’s just a tiny fraction of the 500ha permit,” Morrison said. . . 

If anyone’s got grounds for looking grim it is Morrison and his staff.

“We’ve kept all the records, we’ve complied with all our resource consents — and we’ve been harassed out of business.

“They just keep saying it’s too big … the biggest exploration site ever seen in New Zealand. But the exploration permit doesn’t set any size or volume limit. And if they want me to have a mining permit, well they’ve had a year to process the application and so far — nothing.”

An MBIE spokesman said Morrison’s application for a mining permit was being evaluated but there was a backlog of applications.

“There was a sizeable increase in the number of applications for all permit types last year, especially in the wake of the lifting of Covid-19 lockdown restrictions. Applications for gold-related permits really took off, largely driven by a high gold price.” . . 

The number of bureaucrats in Wellington has increased markedly since Labour got into government. If only some could be working on applications like this to help businesses and employment.

The permit queue had grown rapidly in the last few months of 2020, and officials were trying to deal with it as quickly as possible, the spokesman said.

But Morrison’s application has been in for more than a year.

The ministry did not explain precisely how Morrison had broken the rules, but said exploration permits allowed data gathering over small, specific areas to test if the resource was commercially viable. . . 

When they didn’t explain, was that because they couldn’t or wouldn’t? Either way it’s an appalling way to treat a business.

Inangahua Community Board chairman John Bougen is calling on the ministry to explain exactly why it shut down the venture.

It was deeply disappointing to have a potentially productive private enterprise closed by officials from afar, in a community that badly needed industry and employment, the Reefton businessman said.

“These were high-paying jobs for skilled workers, and MBIE has just pulled about half a million dollars in wages a year out of our community, when you count the contractors as well.”

The West Coast is one of the areas most in need of economic stimulus in the country.

The government, and its employees, should be doing everything possible to help businesses, not shutting them down.

“Pete Morrison was investing in our community and we need to encourage new industry, not strangle it with red tape,” Cr Bougen said.

Buller Mayor Jamie Cleine said he would be concerned if Morrison’s operation had been shut down unnecessarily.

“You would assume the ministry had good reason; that there had been a breach of the permit or whatever.”

A ministry spokesman confirmed the permit Morrison was working under did not limit the size of the operation, but he believed officials were concerned that mining was taking place rather than exploration.

If the permit didn’t limit the size of the operation, where’s the breach?

National Party list MP Maureen Pugh said the shutdown was the worst possible news for the community and was avoidable.

“It’s a disgraceful outcome and I’m truly sorry for Mr Morrison, that he’s been treated this way — plus we have lost jobs, not something we can afford to have happen on the West Coast.”

The permit process had been a challenge for many miners for years, Pugh said.

“It is becoming more and more obvious that the Government and its ministries are not performing well and as I see it, there are no consequences for poor performance, so standards slip.” . . 

Any private business that treated its clients like this wouldn’t survive.

The Ministry is under no threat but it’s poor performance has killed off a business and the highly skilled jobs it supported.

This is a very sorry example of so much that’s wrong with the government and its entities.


%d bloggers like this: