Word of the day

18/05/2021

Boomlet – a small boom or brief increase, as in business, politics, or the birth rate; a small period of rapid growth in a market; a short period of increased activity, interest, or growth in the economy or a part of the economy.


Sowell says

18/05/2021


Rural round-up

18/05/2021

Broken election promise on carbon farming will hurt rural communities :

Federated Farmers has been checking the calendar – six months on from last year’s election and the government has broken an election promise to protect productive farmland.

Labour pledged if re-elected it would take less than six months to protect productive farmland from the rampant spread of large-scale exotic tree planting across the country.

“We were told they would revise the National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry to require forestry blocks intended to be larger than 50 hectares on elite soils, that means Land Use Capability Classes 1-5, to have to get a resource consent,” Federated Farmers president Andrew Hoggard says. . .

Award winners underline contribution of migrant workers – Feds:

Federated Farmers offers hearty congratulations to winners of its merit awards who went on to take national honours at the Dairy Industry Awards on Saturday.

Judges described Dairy Trainee of the Year Ruth Connolly, who won the Federated Farmers Farming Knowledge Award, as articulate, considered and concise; someone who “will lead by example and will bring people into the industry.”

2021 NZ Share Farmers of the Year Manoj Kumar and Sumit Kamboj, who also took out the Federated Farmers Leadership Award, had immersed themselves in their community and industry, promoting Primary ITO courses to everyone and even offering up one of their buildings to ensure the training takes place.

“In this pandemic era, as we debate at national level the role of migrant workers and border security, the success and contribution to our primary industries of these newcomers to our shores is sometimes overlooked,” Feds President Andrew Hoggard said. . . 

Inquiry into the future of the workforce needs in the primary industries of New Zealand:

Parliament’s Primary Production Committee has initiated a select committee inquiry into the future of the workforce needs in the primary industries of New Zealand.

The aim of the inquiry is to look into issues about the future of the workforce needs in the growing food and fibre industries, and what that they will look like in the short, medium and long term future, as we continue to innovate and develop new technologies.

In the 52nd Parliament, the committee opened a briefing about vocational training in agriculture. The issues raised during the briefing will feed into the broader inquiry. . . 

 

Young Māori farmer award winner’s Covid-19 career change

A Whakatāne man forced to head back to New Zealand as the Covid-19 pandemic unfolded has found a new career, and scooped a Young Māori Farmer Award.

Quinn Morgan, who is working his first season on a dairy farm was awarded this years Ahuwhenua Young Māori Farmer Award at a gala dinner in New Plymouth on Friday.

The award was set up in 2012 and is designed to recognise up and coming young Māori in the sheep beef, horticulture and dairy sectors.

The 26-year-old said it was unreal to receive the award. . . 

Jeff Bolstad Receives Inaugural Lifetime Contribution Award For Dedication To NZDIA:

A rural sector stalwart and mentor to many has been recognised for his contribution to the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards programme.

Jeff Bolstad, a Morrinsville farmer, was presented with a Lifetime Contribution Award by the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Trust Chair Natasha Tere, in recognition for his long service and contribution to the Dairy Industry Awards and wider agriculture sector.

“This is the first time this Award has been presented. It’s a prestigious honour that is awarded to an individual that has provided exceptional service to the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards.”

“We have chosen Jeff as he has been a bonding strength behind our organisation. He is a quiet achiever who has guided and mentored many entrants over the years,” says Natasha. . . 

Farm surplus egg scheme provides food for struggling families :

A Cornish free range egg producer has explained how the adversity of the pandemic led to the creation of a scheme to provide hungry families with eggs.

A surplus of eggs had led St Ewe Free Range Egg to create a temporary scheme to provide food to struggling food banks in the South West of England.

CEO Rebecca Tonks has explained how this had developed into ongoing support for families who are finding it difficult to feeds themselves. . .


Yes Sir Humphrey

18/05/2021


No regard for OPM

18/05/2021

Last week we learned thousands of school lunches are left uneaten.

Thousands of taxpayer-funded school lunches are being left uneaten by students each week.

And the Government is not counting the leftovers from one of its flagship policies. . . 

Yesterday we learned that the government is owed nearly $7 million in unpaid MIQ fees:

The Government is reducing the amount of time MIQ guests have to pay their bills after figures showed they are owed almost $7 million in overdue fees for MIQ stays.

Figures obtained by 1 NEWS showed the Government was owed $6,907,434 in overdue invoices from MIQ guests, with $3,792,298 owed by guests who stayed at facilities last year.

A total of 13,155 invoices worth $59,519,661 have been issued for stays since August, with guests having paid a total of $36,783,765. . . 

National’s Covid-19 response spokesperson Chris Bishop said “hotels don’t run honesty systems and the Government shouldn‘t run one either”.

He said the Government should be chasing people who owe money much harder.

In the last three months, $1,196,695 of the $17,025,158 worth of invoices issued was classified as overdue. . .

Both examples show what Heather du Plessis Allan says is a lax approach to our money:

They’re so desperate to convince us that they are good with money, that’s why they froze the pay of all nurses and teachers and police and so on.

But that is not going to convince us of anything, when we constantly see examples of completely careless spending. 

And we’ve seen a lot of it in the last nearly four years.

$3 billion thrown carelessly at the provincial growth fund to buy Winston’s affection, with a negligible number of jobs created.

Is it $14 billion into the wage subsidy scheme, which is a good scheme, but no real chasing and auditing to make sure people who shouldn’t’ have taken the money didn’t. Even the Auditor General called them out for that sloppiness this week.

And $100 million for marae upgrades that were supposed to create 3000 jobs but only created 158. 

This is the attitude I really object to.

And I’m sorry, but as long as Labour ministers like Chris Hipkins just don’t care whether our money is wasted in uneaten school lunches, as long as that happens, Labour will be perceived to be the party that just throws cash away.

Pay freeze the nurses all you like, that perception will stick, because it’s warranted. 

Every dollar the government spends is a dollar that has been taken from other people – taxpayers.

Every dollar wasted is a dollar that isn’t available for urgent priorities including health and education.

Every dollar mis-spent or not recouped reinforces the view that the government has no regard for other people’s money.


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