Word of the day

26/04/2021

Bajulate – to carry to another place; to bear a heavy burden.


Yes Sir Humphrey

26/04/2021


Sowell says

26/04/2021


Rural round-up

26/04/2021

Political expediency – Rural News editorial:

Moves by the Government to end New Zealand’s live export trade is more about politics than ethics.

Sure, it argues that the trade “does not uphold New Zealand’s reputation for high standards of animal welfare” and that it does not fit with the country’s “social conscience”. But that is just – to coin a phrase used by Gulf War veteran General Norman Schwarzkopf – bovine scatology. These claims do not marry with the actual facts. The reality is that the Government is shutting down a legitimate $500 million trade because it polls well to ban it.

The screaming skulls from the likes of SAFE, Greenpeace and other so-called animal activist groups have got in the Government’s ear and won them over by feeding constant, unchallenged misinformation about the live export trade to the public.

David Hayman, spokesman for the Animal Genetics Trade Association, is right on the money when he describes the Government’s decision as one that is aiming for short-term political kudos. . . 

Meat plant delays – Neal Wallace:

Container shortages and shipping issues are forcing some meat plants to work shorter weeks, as companies grapple with the largest prime beef kill in over 30 years.

Alliance Group has on occasion reduced operating hours at its Smithfield and Pukeuri plants in the South Island and Silver Fern Farms (SFF) has on three instances reduced processing capacity at one of its plants as they manage logistical issues.

The shipping logistic problem affects all species, but coincides with a record prime beef kill.

AgriHQ analysts report 637,700 prime steers and heifers have been killed in the year to March 27, 92,000, or 17%, more than the previous record kill, which was last year. . . 

Otago Action Group keen to carry on :

The Otago-based Bruce District Action Group is transitioning to a self-funded group now that the Red Meat Profit Partnership (RMPP) has ended. The group wants to ensure its members can continue to build on the gains they have made.

Group facilitator, Abacus Bio farm consultant Simon Glennie, said the seven group members had originally been part of a farmer discussion group, before switching to become and RMPP Action Group with a business focus.

“This group had already been working together so had a lot of confidence and trust,” he says.

The group undertook the RMPP Taking Ownership of Your Financials programme with farm accountant Lawrence Field early on. . . 

Harvest begins at New Zealand’s biggest cannabis crop

Tens of thousands of cannabis plants are being picked over the coming weeks, as harvest begins at New Zealand’s largest commercial medical cannabis crop.

It’s all happening on Winterhome farm, on the coast of Kēkerengū north of Kaikōura.

The Macfarlane family have farmed Winterhome for five generations, and sons Sank and Winston returned home to convert part of it into a 10 hectare cannabis crop.

“It’s exciting to be part of,” Sank Macfarlane told The Country’s Jamie Mackay. . . 

Honest Wolf – accessories from the Turakina Valley – Country Life:

Sophie and Sam Hurley are turning some of their wool clip into bags, caps, wallets and laptop sleeves. They’ve been in business less than a year but orders are flying out the door – or rather rumbling down their gravel road towards their destinations.

Some days Sophie Hurley writes 30 hand-written notes to customers. Among other things, she always expresses her gratitude for their support of the wool industry.  

Less than a year ago Sophie and her husband Sam Hurley launched Honest Wolf – a line of accessories made from wool from the family farm, Papanui Estate.

The couple were spurred into action by the pitiful returns from wool. . . 

Nicola Sturgeon urged not to sacrifice gamekeeper livelihoods in pursuit of Greens’ policy support – Claire Taylor:

AN OPEN letter has been sent to Scotland’s First Minister, highlighting concerns that the Scottish Green Party’s election proposals could ‘destroy a significant part of Scotland’s cultural heritage’.

Behind the letter are the 5300 members of the Scottish Gamekeepers Association, who believe their livelihoods and that of their families could be under threat, if the next government were to call an end to all game management and angling in Scotland – as proposed by the Greens.

The SGA claim that not only will such a move place thousands of rural workers on the dole, impacting on their wellbeing and the future prospects of their family, but would impose ‘crippling burdens’ on the public purse.

The letter urges Nicola Sturgeon not to bargain with the livelihoods of rural workers, in order to gain the Greens support over future policies. . .


Yes Sir Humphrey

26/04/2021


From the Covid-19 coalface

26/04/2021

The  New Zealand government was late and lax in its response to Covid-19, shortcomings in MIQ facilities has let the disease through the border too many times and there are still too many unanswered questions about when and how most of us will be vaccinated.

That said, the number of people who contracted the disease and number of deaths was relatively low and, closed border aside, life is back to as close to normal as it could be for most of us with a freedom to move and congregate that few other countries can enjoy.

This has led some people to question how serious Covid-19 is.

The BBC’s stories from doctors and nurses at St George’s Hospital tell just how bad it can be.

From nurses talking about crying when they get home to doctors asking people to stop “bending” the rules because it’s leading to people in their 20s, 30s and 40s dying, these are the staff of St George’s Hospital.

The interviews in the video from the Covid-19 healthcare coalface give first-hand answers to the question of how bad the spread could be.

Anyone who still thinks the disease isn’t serious need only look at the rapid spread and high number of deaths in India,  Brazil, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea which are now on the list of very high risk countries from which travellers can no longer enter New Zealand.

Some have called this racist.

It’s not. The decision had nothing at all to do with race, it is simply and clearly based on the spread of Covid-19 in those countries and the risk travellers from those countries would pose if they came here.


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