Rural round-up

Massive deluge ‘kick in teeth ‘ at start of year – Hamish MacLean:

The deluge that drowned crops, dug up roads, and overwhelmed water supplies in Otago to start the year was a “real kick in the teeth” for many.

In some places, localised downpours dumped up to a third of the annual average rainfall for an area on to land and into rivers that could not cope.

And while a cleanup that could take weeks or months was under way yesterday, the region’s mayors said Otago had weathered another major storm.

Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan said things were slowly returning to normal yesterday but roads remained closed, bridges were damaged, and three towns were on boil-water notices. . . 

Few ATMs, unreliable internet – and now banks cheque-mate farmers – Nikki Mandow:

Banks are accused of discriminating against rural customers by phasing out cheques before the broadband rollout to farms is complete. A Rural Women survey shows one in four families have little or no bank or ATM access, and many still have no internet – but the banks are ripping up their cheques.

Farmers and rural households are being told to switch to internet banking when banks stop accepting cheques this year. Yet thousands still have no access to broadband. Go figure.

In August 2020, Rural Women NZ sent out a survey to members, a survey which garnered the highest response rate that government relations manager Angela McLeod can remember over the two years she’s been in the job. 

Her members weren’t getting hot under the collar about health or education, agriculture or the environment. It wasn’t even a survey about firearms – although that survey got the second highest response rate.  . . 

How the Canes make hay while the sun shines – The Country:

Malcolm Cane has always preferred to do it himself, from silage and haymaking to drilling and cultivating.

Looking back over 30 years of deer-farming, it’s probably been a big part of his success.

Cane and his wife Kathy farm 390ha at Reporoa, of which 146ha is leased to a dairy farmer.

The Canes run about 1000 stags and 500 hinds, plus about 500 mixed-sex weaners at any one time. . . 

Detectors help bat walks work – Richard Davison:

Visitors to the Catlins have a chance to catch one of the area’s more elusive residents on the wing this summer.

Owaka couple Annette and Murray Patterson are leading a pair of New Zealand long-tailed bat detection walks during the holidays, under the twin banners of South Otago Forest and Bird, and the Catlins Bats on the Map project.

The first, successful, outing took place on December 29, and aspiring chiropterologists (bat scientists) could sign up for the second, at Tawanui, on Saturday, January 16, Mrs Patterson said.

The walks form part of an ongoing study programme led by self-described “bat lady” Catriona Gower, which has identified key Catlins locations for the critically endangered native mammal species. . . 

People are seasonal too – Stephen Barnard:

Over the festive period a number of city folk will have packed the car and travelled into the regions to catch up with their farming relatives.

If they completed the same trip last year they might have noticed changes in the countryside on their way. Hopefully greener pasture, fuller dams and fatter livestock.

Once arrived they might have been greeted by a swarm of flies, a pack of farm dogs making an eager inspection, and by talk of the weather, the harvest and the market.

Depending on the farm, they’ll have witnessed a flurry of activity as crops were harvested, or else not much at all as their family members took a well-earned break. . .

Emphasise UK meat’s sustainability this year, sector says :

Wales could put forward positive credentials as the world’s most sustainable place to produce red meat as climate change is set to dominate 2021, according to an industry figure.

In his New Year’s Day message, Hybu Cig Cymru – Meat Promotion Wales (HCC) chairman Kevin Roberts painted an up-beat picture of the long-term future of Welsh red meat.

Mr Roberts’s reminded the food and farming industry that Welsh beef and lamb were strong brands that consumers could trust in uncertain times.

He pointed out that UK retail sales of lamb and beef had risen in 2020 as consumers supported domestic farmers, that European importers had stuck with Welsh meat through the worst of Brexit uncertainty, and that long-term work to develop new markets was paying off. . . 

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