Word of the day

10/12/2020

Toft – site for a dwelling and its outbuildings also; an entire holding comprising a homestead and additional land; a house site and its adjoining arable land; a small grove of trees; a hillock; a place where a messuage has once stood; the site of a burnt or decayed house; a messuage with right of common.


Sowell says

10/12/2020


Rural round-up

10/12/2020

Getting offset, not offside, about native forests:

September 2020 saw the publication of Native Forests: Resetting the Balance, a report by the Aotearoa Circle that explores ways in which we can accelerate the regeneration of native biodiversity at scale while optimising the use of New Zealand’s land assets.

There is little to argue with here: “Protecting and enhancing the biodiversity of New Zealand is central to supporting our unique natural environment, which is fundamental to our very existence, our culture, our way of living, international brand and key sectors of our economy.” There is broad consensus on this – from primary industry, from government ministries and agencies, from the science sector, and from iwi.

But what is our collective best shot, given climate change, accelerating biodiversity decline, and business and economic drivers that largely favour land-use intensification? The report offers one audacious but attainable solution: to plant or regenerate native forests as carbon sinks across as much of the country as possible.

Audacious, because economic short-termism must be replaced by longer-term mindsets informed by environmental priorities. Attainable, because the economic payoffs of natives vs exotics are already costed in the report to be greater over the longer term, and because New Zealand has the space and the natural resources to enable the switch to be made. As Manaaki Whenua’s Land Resources Inventory shows, there is plenty of agriculturally marginal land across the country that could support native forests. . .

Cherry picking the RSE evidence – Eric Crampton:

Decades ago, sociologist Joel Best wrote about how to lie with statistics. The best tricks are those where a statement is word-for-word true but has nothing to do with reality, writes Eric Crampton.

Last week, the Productivity Commission released a draft report on companies pushing the boundaries, or “frontier firms.” It’s an important area for study. Low rates of productivity growth mean lower living standards.

But the report’s section on immigration and productivity, and on the Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) programme in particular, is a case study in misleading evidence.

The Productivity Commission writes: “While the scheme has clearly provided benefits for both employers and workers, two recent studies have also shown negative impacts on some RSE workers and their communities (Bailey, 2019; Bedford et al., 2020).” . . 

Fruit picking’s fresh faces : it’s a good way to motivate myself – Tess Brunton:

Central Otago orchard owners say the push for workers is not over as they prepare for harvest season.

Today Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi and Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni visited an apple orchard near Alexandra to speak with workers and growers.

Luke Condon, 23, relocated from Christchurch to work in orchards in Central Otago and has been thinning apple trees at CAJ Hollandia.

It all started with a Ministry of Social Development programme aimed to encourage people to pick up seasonal work. . . 

 

 

Quality over quantity – Gerard Hutching:

A Canterbury couple who make top quality buffalo cheese faced a tough time during the covid-19 lockdown but now that their market is back, it’s stronger than ever. 

Everyone has their covid-19 story, but that of Lucy Appleton and Christo Keijzer is arguably more dramatic than most.

As the March lockdown hit, Lucy was still dealing with the aftermath of her mother’s recent death. But as well as mourning her mum, she was having to focus on the future of the couple’s buffalo dairy business, which largely hinged on supplying the restaurant trade with specialty cheeses such as mozzarella.

The gravity of the situation only became apparent as she did the rounds of their regular clients in Christchurch in late March. . . 

Pest that targets several vegetables, roses here to stay – Maja Burry:

The Ministry for Primary Industries says it’s unlikely a plant pest recently detected in New Zealand will be able to be eradicated.

Two populations of the tomato red spider mite were found near Auckland Airport in late May.

That prompted a biosecurity response which has since led to the mite being found in other parts of the city.

The tiny mite feeds on plants in the Solanaceae family, including tomatoes, potatoes and eggplants, as well as beans, kumara and some ornamentals – roses and orchids. In large groups, they can mummify plants, wrapping them up in silk webbing and feeding on the plant until it dies. . . 

Tranquil rural homestead as an add-value opportunity:

A luxurious country homestead operating as a popular event venue just north of Invercargill has been placed on the market for sale.

The rustic four-bedroom family home and events venue at 201 Lochiel Branxholme Road in Southland is offered for sale by tender closing 4pm Thursday 28 January 2021.

Locally known as ‘The Hideaway 201’; idyllic garden-set function venues occupy more than 11.5 hectares of landscaped grounds, attracting local and out of town visitors, say Bayleys Southland salespeople, Linda Riordan and Paula Johnstone. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

10/12/2020


Here’s the answer

10/12/2020

Here’s the answer to the housing shortage in one picture:

Why did Christchurch diverge from the national trend?

Land was freed up for development after the earthquakes.

Housing statistics released today and over the weekend show an unfolding disaster for New Zealand families and communities, National’s Housing spokesperson Nicola Willis says.

“We now have the lowest rates of home-ownership we’ve seen in 70 years, the biggest social housing waiting list on record and record numbers of Kiwis turning to emergency housing.

“New Zealand’s housing problems are fast becoming a national emergency. Where is the urgency in the Government response?

“It’s time for emergency measures to get more houses built, like those used in Christchurch to rebuild the thousands of houses that were wiped-out by that disaster.”

The National Government at the time recognised emergency regulations needed to free up land and remove development constraints. As a result, new house building took off.

The surge in housing supply put a lid on affordability, with the ‘multiple’ between median incomes and median house prices stabilising in Christchurch for the period 2014-2020, while elsewhere cumbersome regulations resulted in housing become more unaffordable.

National is willing to work with the Government to develop immediate measures modelled on the Christchurch response by zoning more land for housing, over-riding the RMA appeals process and increasing leniency on the timing of provision of infrastructure.

“If we get the regulations right, developers will build at scale and pace,” Ms Willis says.

“We can’t afford to wait years for this Government to get on with Resource Management Act reform while house prices continue to rocket.

“Faced with an emergency of inter-generational proportions, action is required.”

The high cost of building is part of the problem of sky rocketing house prices but the price of land is the much more significant and the solution to that is to increase the supply.

It worked in Christchurch, it would work everywhere else.


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