Word of the day

27/11/2020

Saorosa – freedom, liberty; salvation, redemption.


Sowell says

27/11/2020


Rural round-up

27/11/2020

Farmgate prices for red meat set to fall – Sudesh Kissun:

Red meat farmers are being warned to brace themselves for a dip in market returns.

A new report from Rabobank says reduced global demand for higher-value beef and lamb cuts in the year ahead will see New Zealand farmgate prices for beef and sheepmeat drop from the record highs experienced over recent seasons.

In the bank’s flagship annual outlook for the meat sector, Global Animal Proteins Outlook 2021: Emerging from a world of uncertainty, Rabobank says a slow and uneven recovery in the international foodservice sector, combined with weak global economic conditions, will reduce demand for higher-value New Zealand red meat cuts such as prime beef and lamb racks. . . 

NZ venison ‘facing perfect storm’ – Annette Scott:

Despite currently facing the perfect storm, the deer industry is confident New Zealand farm-raised venison has a long-term future.

With the covid-19 resurgence disrupting key venison markets across Europe and the US, NZ venison processors and marketers are making major efforts to again find new outlets for farm-raised venison cuts.

Many countries and regions have reimposed hospitality lockdowns, meaning expensive cuts such as venison striploins are sitting in freezers in Europe and the US waiting for restaurants to re-open.

Deer Industry NZ (DINZ) chief executive Innes Moffat says the current situation is a challenge with the bulk of NZ venison sold to the US and Germany destined for the food service. . . 

 

Challenges ahead but opportunities abound – Colin Williscroft:

Melissa Clark-Reynolds is stepping down from her role as independent director at Beef + Lamb NZ at the end of the year but she is excited about the future of the primary sector. Colin Williscroft reports.

In-market strategies used to market and distribute New Zealand-produced food will need to be increasingly agile during the next few years, Melissa Clark-Reynolds says.

With food service overseas under pressure due to lockdowns, the emphasis has gone back on retail sales and she predicts traditional markets will be disrupted until at least 2022.

However, the current importance of retail avenues does not mean outlets such as supermarkets are going to have it all their way, with direct-to-consumer products gaining an increasingly strong foothold. . . 

Shearing company scoops business award

Higgins Shearing, Marlborough, was named the Supreme Award winner at the NZI Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Business Awards last night.

The company was one of seven category award winners announced at the Public Trust Hall in Wellington.

“We strive to break through the status quo of the shearing industry,” owner Sarah Higgins said.

Higgins said that her inspiration comes from passion for the job. . . 

Family lavender farm flourishing – Mary-Jo Tohill:

When there’s a will there’s a way.

That would just about sum up things for the Zeestraten family when they first came to a bare paddock in Wanaka about eight years ago, and began to establish their 12ha Wanaka Lavender Farm.

With the lavender beginning to bloom for a new season, co-owner Tim Zeestraten (37) recalls a journey that began 25 years ago when the family moved from Holland.

“My opa (grandfather) was a tomato grower, which my dad, Jan Zeestraten took over. I was probably — actually most definitely — going to be next in line to continue the family tomato farm, which I was very excited about at the young age of 10. . . 

New England Peonies enjoy bumper peony season on the Northern Tablelands – Billy Jupp:

THEY are one of the most highly sought-after features of Australia’s spring wedding season and are often the centrepiece of a couple’s special day.

Despite COVID-19 forcing many people to postpone their nuptials, 2020 still proved to be a stellar year for peonies.

The colourful, full-bodied flower was still in high demand and the chilly winter conditions on the state’s Northern Tablelands proved to be the perfect breeding ground.

New England Peonies owner Barry Philp said this season was one of the best in his family’s 20 years of growing peonies on their Arding property, near Armidale. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

27/11/2020


New normal same cancer

27/11/2020

Early diagnosis and treatment can make the difference between surviving cancer and dying from it.

Covid-19 lockdowns have saved some lives but endangered those of others whose diagnosis and treatment have been delayed.

Ovarian cancer is one which is often diagnosed late at the best of times because symptoms can be vague and mistaken for those of several far less serious problems.

You can learn about symptoms at Cure Our Ovarian Cancer. If they persist for more than two weeks, see a doctor and keep going until you get a diagnosis.

 


If it’s an emergency

27/11/2020

The government plans to declare a climate emergency in parliament next week.

If it is an emergency, the declaration wouldn’t be delayed until next week,

The announcement of an announcement of the declaration next week is a bit like saying “I’m having a heart attack but don’t worry about calling for an ambulance for a few days.”

If it is an emergency, there will have to be urgent action to deal with it.

If it’s an emergency all policy regulating activity here will not result in an increase in emissions elsewhere.

If it’s an emergency all action will be determined by science rather than politics and bureaucracy.

That would result in an immediate ban on allowing long-lived gases to be off-set by the planting of trees.

And it would take a whole-of-life approach to determining what is and isn’t climate friendly.

If it’s an emergency we can expect drastic changes to what we can and can’t do. It would include a ban on all but essential travel using fossil fuels and the end to motor sport.

If it’s an emergency reaction would be more than words and symbolism.


%d bloggers like this: