Word of the day

02/11/2020

Perhorresce – to shudder or tremble convulsively, typically as a result of fear or revulsion; to feel a growing horror at.


Sowell says

02/11/2020


Rural round-up

02/11/2020

Farmers set for another tough summer as staffing woes drag on – Esther Taunton:

Kiwi farmers could be in for another tough slog through spring and summer as staffing woes drag on.

With last summer’s drought still fresh in the minds of farmers across the North Island and many in the south hit hard by February’s floods, the weather remains a concern for many.

But with Niwa predicting a change for the better in the north, including a higher chance of beneficial rain through November and December, and drier conditions in the south, it could become a secondary issue. . . 

Where to now in the war on rabbits? – Hamish MacLean:

For about 150 years New Zealand has waged a war on rabbits.

Ferrets, stoats and cats have been bred and released en masse to hunt down the pests.

Hundreds of kilometres of fences have been erected to box the animals in.

Rabbit burrows have been gassed.

In the wake of World War 2 fixed-wing aeroplanes were used to drop poison, the landscape being bombed with 1080 from 1954. . . 

Online service aims to help fill shortage in fruit pickers :

A new online job service hopes to get students into summer fruit picking work as growers continue to warn of a dire shortage of pickers.

Earlier this month, another warning from growers was issued in a desperate statement, which said some fruit and vegetables could rot unharvested this summer because of a shortage of people to pick them.

Pick Tiki – dreamed up by university graduates Emma Boase and Summer Wynyard – is now linking young New Zealanders with fruit growers around the country. . . 

Whineray climbs his first Fonterra peak – Hugh Stringleman:

One thousand litres of milk a second are flowing into Fonterra’s processing plants at the height of the spring milk peak, chief operating officer Fraser Whineray says.

The newly re-energised dairy industry senior executive has more gee-whiz statistics.

The full flow is around 82 million litres a day, similar to last year, a farm pick-up every nine seconds, a tanker discharged every 22sec and a container door closed every three minutes. . . 

A strong sense of community – Colin Williscroft:

Kohuratahi farmer Daniel ‘Pork’ Hutchinson spent many years working in the UK and parts of mainland Europe and Australia, but for him there’s nowhere better than the eastern Taranaki farm he grew up on. Colin Williscroft reports.

Pork Hutchinson’s connection to the property where he and wife Ceri live, about 20 kilometres north-east of Whangamomona, runs deep.

Born and bred on the property, he’s the third generation of his family to farm it.

Schooled locally, the Welsh black cattle breeder and local community stalwart spent his early years just down the road at Marco School, before his secondary school years at Stratford High. . . 

Bull semen flies out door as LIC ships biggest ever shipment to South Island:

Demand for LIC’s fresh liquid bull semen is literally flying out the door as demand rockets. The cooperative has chartered a plane through Mainland Air to airfreight over 70,000 straws of semen (its biggest inter-island shipment) from Hamilton to Nelson, Christchurch, Invercargill and Dunedin departing on Saturday 31 October.

The shipment is just one of many LIC will be making as its team works to impregnate four million cows over the coming months.

The 12cm long straws flying out of Hamilton tomorrow will be stored in secure chilly bins as cargo during the flight with care and speed of delivery critical to maintaining the semen’s integrity. . . 


Jumped or pushed?

02/11/2020

Kelvin Davis has ruled himself out as deputy Prime Minister:

Whether he jumped or was pushed it is the right decision.

His inability to deal with the media and question time that was so evident in the last government would be even more of a problem if he was deputy PM.

The tourism industry will also be hoping that either he’s ruled himself out of that portfolio or the PM rules him out.

He’s been almost invisible while the sector has been dealing with Covid-19’s decimation and needs a minister who will listen to and work with them.


Yes Sir Humphrey

02/11/2020


Foot in mouth outbreak at Massey

02/11/2020

A Massey University professor is suffering from foot in mouth:

National and ACT have become “vanishingly irrelevant” in Parliament following the Greens’ acceptance of the cooperation agreement offered by Labour, a politics professor believes.

The deal has locked in a political arrangement that will see Labour and the Greens “monster the Parliament” for the next three years, according to Massey University’s Richard Shaw, with a combined 74 of 120 seats held by the parties. . . 

“The National Party, ACT, and the Māori Party – assuming that the specials mean they keep Waiariki – are vanishingly irrelevant to what occurs in the Parliament,” Shaw told Newshub on Saturday.

He says the agreement – which the Greens will sign in a ceremony on Sunday – marks the largest political alliance in New Zealand’s parliamentary history.

It is the first time under MMP one party has gained more than 50% of the vote. But the political alliance isn’t very much bigger than the 2008 National-led government with 58 National MPs plus five each from Act and the Maori Party and one from United Future.

“It’s really hard to overstate how much the legislative agenda and the executive agenda will be driven by Labour with some support from the Greens, it’s a really remarkable state of affairs,” Shaw says.

Oh dear, it’s really hard to overstate what a very ill-informed remark that is. How can a professor of politics not understand how parliament works?

Unless it’s a minority government, the government has a majority as a result of which it passes the legislation it wants to. This one doesn’t have to negotiate with partners, but the major parties in previous governments could use their confidence and supply agreement to get their allies to support their Bills.

“And if you’re a National or ACT MP, you would be sitting there thinking, ‘Shit, what am I going to do for the next three years? I’m going to be surrounded by Opposition members in all of the select committees’ – it’s just dominated by Labour’s policy.” . . 

Yes it’s dominated by Labour policy and Act and National will be surrounded by government MPs. But good Opposition MPs won’t be wondering what they’ll be doing for the next three years. They’ll do what they’re paid to do – work very hard to to get better legislation, not by opposing for opposition’s sake, but by working with and against other members of select committees as appropriate, and on some, albeit rare, occasions they might even support government legislation.

If they hold a seat, they’ll also be very active in their electorate supporting and advocating for their constituents, and  a good list MP will also be doing electorate work.

They will be drawing up Members’ Bills in the hope they’ll be drawn out of the ballot too.

National MPs will be working very hard to be loyal members of a united caucus that doesn’t leak and will be contributing to policy development that is consistent with the party’s principles and philosophy unless they want to contribute to an even worse result for the party in three years time.

If they have spare time, they might also,  in an act of public service, help to extract the foot from the mouth of the professor of politics, and educate him on how the political system works and the essential democratic role a hard-working opposition plays in that no matter how outnumbered its members might be.


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