Rural round-up

28/10/2020

Back the sector that backs New Zealand – Sam McIvor:

The biggest issue currently facing our industry is environmental policy, writes Beef+Lamb NZ chief executive Sam McIvor.

Farmers are passionate about being good stewards of their land and want to do the right thing. However, the scale and pace of new government regulations is impacting the financial viability of farming, affecting farmers’ confidence in their industry and having adverse effects on mental health.

In the next government term, we need to see improvements in the essential freshwater regulations to make the rules workable for farmers so they can get on with achieving the desired water health outcomes.

Meanwhile, the government must get fossil fuel emitters to reduce their emissions rather than just planting their pollution on our farms. Limits must be set on the amount of offsetting allowed in the ETS before it’s too late and further swathes of productive sheep and beef farmland are converted to forestry for carbon farming. The RMA isn’t the right tool to fix this problem, but we can work with the government on what is.  . . 

Meat forecast raises questions – Neal Wallace:

Forecasts that this year’s export lamb crop could be below 18 million for the first time has observers questioning what the impact will be.

Beef + Lamb NZ’s (B+LNZ) new season outlook is forecasting the value of meat exports to fall $1 billion to $7.4bn in the coming year due to market uncertainty from the covid-19 pandemic and increased competition for beef markets.

The report forecasts a lamb crop of 22.3 million, of which 17.4m will be processed for export.

Last year the crop was 23.3m, of which 18.7m were processed. . . 

Sector needs breathing space – Neal Wallace:

Farming leaders say they can work with the incoming government but are asking for space to allow the sector to adjust to regulations introduced by the previous administration.

Beef + Lamb NZ (B+LNZ) chair Andrew Morrison says a priority for the next three years will be developing and enhancing trade, especially free trade agreements with the UK and European Union.

But he is asking that the Government give farmers time to implement new freshwater and climate change rules and regulations.

“Don’t give us more stuff, let us deliver this stuff first,” he said. . . 

Van der Poel, Glass re-elected by farmers – Sudesh Kissun:

Dairy farmers have returned Jim van der Poel and Colin Glass as DairyNZ directors for another three-year term.

Van der Poel, who chairs the industry-good organisation and Glass, chief executive of Dairy Holdings Ltd, saw off a challenge from young Ashburton farmer Cole Groves in this year’s director elections.

The result was announced at DairyNZ’s annual meeting in Ashburton last night. . . 

History underpins infant formula operation – Richard Davison:

French food and drink giant Danone enjoys closer links to New Zealand — and particularly the deep South — than might at first be apparent. Richard Davison finds out more about the company’s plans for its Clydevale, South Otago, operation as it invests $30million in green energy, and in its latest boost to local employment.

Danone, founded in Barcelona, Spain in 1919 by Isaac Carasso, and perhaps best known for dominating the yoghurt and dairy food markets in Europe, is better known domestically for its foothold in the infant formula market.

Brands such as Aptamil and Karicare are familiar names to many a Kiwi mum, and the latter brand also has a close historical association with a key New Zealand identity.

New Plymouth-born Sir Truby King was a noted innovator in many areas and, during the early 1900s, ran a dairy farm and logging operation in remote Catlins hamlet Tahakopa. . .

From defense to disruption, how companies are approaching sustainability in the food system:

When Mary Shelman, an internationally recognized thought leader and speaker, takes to the stage, there are many accolades and qualifications she could list to introduce herself. But she always starts like this:

“You’ll see that I live in Boston. You know, I was at Harvard Business school, but I’m from Kentucky. And not only Kentucky- my Dad was a farm equipment dealer there, and then when I was in middle school, he bought one farm and then a second farm.”

The generations before her -on both sides – were all from Kentucky.

 “Always in agriculture, always too poor to own their own land,” she said.  . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

28/10/2020


Sign to save lives

28/10/2020

One New Zealand woman dies of ovarian cancer every 48 hours.

You can help change that horrifying statistic by following this link and signing the petition to save lives.

It is the work of four gynaecological cancer organisations that are seeking better outcomes for women with the disease with a petition that seeks better education of women and health practitioners, improved access to tests and treatment, improved access to clinical trials and a lot more research.

The petition is non-partisan, the women promoting it have worked across parliament to get cross-party support.

The media release from Ovarian Cancer Awareness explains:

Organiser of a petition asking for a better deal for education about and support for ovarian cancer, Jane Ludemann, says that legislators and decision makers need to start taking this disease seriously; it kills a woman every two days in Aotearoa New Zealand.

“Ovarian Cancer is the most deadly gynaecological cancer, and kills more women than New Zealand’s annual road toll and more than melanoma. Yet it remains underfunded and largely ignored,” she says.

Jane is spearheading a petition to Parliament asking for the development of ovarian cancer education campaigns for the public and health professionals, better access to testing for women with symptoms, improved access to approved therapies and clinical trials, and dedicated funding of research.

“The most significant issues around ovarian cancer begin with the lack of knowledge about it – women don’t know the symptoms and leave it too long to report to their doctors, who themselves often don’t connect the symptoms with the cause.

“Next, there is no specific screening test for ovarian cancer (unlike a mammogram for breast cancer or a smear for cervical cancer) and providers use the excuse of funding to leave symptomatic women untested.

“Then we lack access to drugs that are proven effective overseas and to clinical trials – which would allow women to access promising new treatments.

Jane says that virtually every advance in cancer survival has been made on the back of clinical trials and the lack of funding in this country means the trials are not available here.

“It is extraordinary that the government spends more than $126 million on medical research through the Health Research Council (HRC) every year. In 2018, 2019 and (to date) in 2020 the HRC has not funded any ovarian cancer research at all.

“Significant improvements in survival just cannot be made without advances in treatment and screening through research.

“There are just too many families affected by the Ovarian Cancer-caused illness and deaths of mothers, partners, sisters, nieces and friends. In the lead up to the election we hope both sides of the house will pay attention to this very real health issue,” she said.

The petition is being supported by Cure Our Ovarian Cancer, Ovarian Cancer Awareness, Talk Peach, and the New Zealand Gynaecological Cancer Foundation. If can be accessed here:

www.parliament.nz/en/pb/petitions/document/PET_99389/petition-of-jane-ludemann-for-cure-our-ovarian-cancer

Ovarian Cancer – some facts

  • One New Zealand woman dies of ovarian cancer every 48 hours.
  • Ovarian cancer survival overall less than half that of breast cancer. For advanced (stage 3-4) ovarian cancer, the 5 year survival rates are 3-4+ times less.
  • 90% of NZ women can’t name a single symptom before they are diagnosed. The majority of women in NZ are diagnosed at an advanced stage.
  • In New Zealand overall survival is 37%, a figure which hasn’t changed in over 15 years, and is 5% less than Australia. If detected at stage 1 (when the cancer is contained within the ovary) survival is over 90 %
  • A cervical smear does not detect ovarian cancer. There is no screening test. However, a ca-125 blood test and transvaginal ultrasound can detect over 98% of ovarian cancers and their combined cost is similar to a mammogram. But over a quarter of NZ women with ovarian cancer have to visit their doctor 5 or more times about their symptoms before being offered a test
  • Australian government in 2019 announced targeted research funding – allocating an additional $35 million ($20 million for ovarian cancer and a further $15 million for gynaecological clinical trials). The New Zealand government has funded no research in this area for the past three years.
  • For more information see: https://ovariancancer.co.nz

Jane is my daughter. I wrote about her living under the cancer sword here.

Her personal website is janehascancer.com 

You’ll find more about the petition and ovarian cancer at Ovarian Cancer Aotearoa Coalition


Word of the day

27/10/2020

Hanami – flower viewing; the Japanese traditional custom of enjoying the transient beauty of flowers.


Sowell says

27/10/2020


Rural round-up

27/10/2020

Call for full story on carbon – Hamish MacLean:

A Dunedin city councillor is warning against demonising agriculture as a producer of greenhouse gases.

As the region awaits an Otago-wide inventory of emissions, Cr Mike Lord said if Otago’s emissions profile included what the region exported without considering what the region imported, it could suggest an unfair, unbalanced climate change mitigation strategy was required.

“I just think we need to be careful because the data doesn’t always tell you the full story,” Cr Lord said.

“And I don’t think we want to demonise agriculture — that’s my bottom line.” . . 

Farmer Fears for livelihood amid tenure review – Mark Price:

Charles Innes looks too rugged to be a man who cannot sleep at night for worry.

However, he admits he does, and says he sometimes resorts to a little home brew to solve the problem.

With no tourists using his backpacker accommodation, a predicted 26% drop in average farm profits before tax on sheep and beef farms this season and children to educate at boarding school, Mr Innes has plenty of material for worrying.

He expected completing the tenure review process could help financially, although it might not save the farm. . . 

Deferred grazing a tool to raise farm system resilience :

Deferred grazing is a tool that can be used to combat drought, rejuvenate pastures, improve stock health, mitigate against sediment loss, reduce cost and take the stress out of farming.

A three-year research project to quantify the impact of deferred grazing on the pasture, the soil and the farm system has highlighted the benefits of a practice once regarded as lazy farming.

Deferred grazing is the practice of resting pastures from grazing from mid- to late spring until late summer / early autumn.

The trial, which was carried out by AgResearch (led by Katherine Tozer) and Plant and Food Research, was run on trial sites on three commercial farms in the Bay of Plenty and Northern Waikato. Scientists sought to understand more about the effects of deferred grazing, how to successfully apply it and why it works. . . 

Farmers find niche in wool carding :

A small sign on State Highway 8 near Raes Junction on the West Otago/Central Otago border says Wool Carding 1km.

The track leads to a sheep farm where Barb and Stuart Peel run their carding business from a large shed.

Carding is a mechanical process that opens fibres, disentangling them so they can be used for spinning and felting.

The business was started by Stuart’s father, Don, who farmed sheep on the 160 hectare property. . . 

 

 

National real estate agency and Southland rural property company merge to expand their operations:

Leading national real estate agency Bayleys has expanded the scope of its southernmost operations – acquiring a shareholding in a boutique Southland property company specialising in farm sales.

Bayleys Southland and Country & Co Realty Limited will now be rebranded under the name Country & Co in partnership with Bayleys.

Bayleys Southland is part of Bayleys Real Estate – New Zealand’s largest full-service real estate agency with a network of some 90 offices nationwide and more than 2000 employees. . . 

Belching cows and endless feedlots: fixing cattle’s climate issues – Henry Fountain:

Randy Shields looked out at a sea of cattle at the sprawling Wrangler Feedyard — 46,000 animals milling about in the dry Panhandle air as a feed truck swept by on its way to their pens.

Mr. Shields, who manages the yard for Cactus Feeders, knows that at its most basic, the business simply takes something that people can’t eat, and converts it into something they can: beef. That’s possible because cattle have a multichambered stomach where microbes ferment grass and other tough fibrous vegetation, making it digestible.

“The way I look at it, I’ve got 46,000 fermentation vats going out there,” Mr. Shields said. . .


Yes Sir Humphrey

27/10/2020


Made with care

27/10/2020

New Zealand Trade and Enterprise has launched a campaign to keep our food and beverage in the minds of global consumers:

The campaign, titled ‘Made with Care’, is being led by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) and is part of a wider ‘Messages from New Zealand’ country brand campaign, which sees Tourism New Zealand (TNZ), NZTE, Ministry for Primary Industries, Education New Zealand and New Zealand Story join forces to promote New Zealand’s brand on the world stage.

New Zealand’s food and beverage industry is a key player in our economy, accounting for close to 46% of all goods and services exports in the past year. In 2018/2019, the industry had a combined revenue of $71.7 billion, with exports reaching more than 140 countries. The top three exports markets in 2018 were China ($6.14 billion), Australia ($2.56 billion) and the United States ($2.53 billion).*

NZTE’s Chief Executive, Pete Chrisp, says the campaign has been backed by significant investment and driven by consumer insights.

“There’s never been a better time to leverage the positive global sentiment being felt towards New Zealand and to raise the international profile of the New Zealand brand in key markets, in a time when we can’t visit our key markets, and they can’t visit us.

“We know from research conducted by New Zealand Story earlier this year that, while the priority order of consumers needs has changed in the current climate, the needs themselves remain fundamentally the same.

“Consumers are looking for safe, nutritious, premium quality, ethical and tasty food and beverages. New Zealand, as a net exporter of food for more than 40 million people, is perfectly placed to meet these needs. The way the industry applies ingenuity and science is an additional driver of preference for our products in our key export markets.”

Underpinning the Made with Care sentiment, and what distinguishes New Zealand food and beverage products from others, is the principle of Taiao – the interconnectedness of our people and the natural world. The values of Kaitiakitanga (guardians, caring for people, place and planet, now and for future generations), Manaakitanga (caring for others and showing hospitality, kindness, generosity, support and respect) and Ingenuity (challenging the status quo with original and bold solutions) are also woven throughout the campaign messaging. . .


Choose when to take stat holidays?

27/10/2020

A Hindu group is calling for Diwali to be made a public holiday:

Universal Society of Hinduism president Rajan Zed, who is based in the US, said that the government needs to revisit its public holiday policies as the country’s demography has changed.*

He said it’s unfair for the Hindu community to be at work or school on their most popular festival and making it a public holiday would be a “a step in the positive direction”.

Zed said that awareness about other religions created by such holidays like Diwali would strengthen cohesion and unity in the country.

Would it, or would it, like most other statutory holidays, become just another day off with little or no interest in the reason behind it for most of us?

This year’s Diwali falls on Saturday, 14 November. In 2022, Diwali falls on Monday, 24 October.

October 24th will be Labour Day which is a national holiday anyway.

Easter’s changing dates already cause problems with planning, adding another movable celebration would cause more confusion.

Adding another holiday for one culture will add to calls for special days for other cultures to be recognised.

Labour made an election promise to make Matariki a public holiday.

That was popular and I wouldn’t object to it but I am in the camp which favours it replacing one of the 11 existing statutory holiday rather than adding a 12th although which it would replace is debatable.

Act leader David Seymour has an alternative idea:

Act says there’s a way to give workers the public holidays they want – without burdening employers with extra costs.

The party is calling for an overhaul to the current holiday laws. . . 

Leader David Seymour says national holidays like Anzac Day and Waitangi Day should be mandated – but other holidays like Easter and Labour Day don’t need to be.

He told Tim Dower making holidays flexible is better than creating more holidays.

“If you keep putting costs onto employment, you’ve got to apply some cause and effect thinking, because people who run businesses and employ people, they’re going to absorb that cost.”

Seymour says that the best option is to introduce some flexibility, with people able to trade out particular days.

Schools couldn’t have pupils taking days off at anytime to suit holidaying parents; having staff away at odd times could put pressure on other workers and some businesses find it easier to have all staff off at the same time.

People planning reunions, other celebrations and events often choose long weekends to maximise the chance of people being able to attend. With no set dates for holidays, numbers attending might be reduced.

However, people who have jobs in businesses or services that operate on holidays already have some choice over when they take their statutory days.

Flexibility over holiday dates could lead to a reduction in costs for employers too. If workers could choose which day to take a holiday it would do away with the current requirement to pay time and a half and give another day off to anyone who works on a statutory holiday.

It would allow people to choose dates that suited them, reduce traffic to and from holiday spots, and could even out some of the peaks and troughs for accommodation and activity providers in holiday hot spots by spreading visitor numbers over longer periods.

Flexibility over when statutory holidays are taken could work and it’s definitely better than adding another one.


Word of the day

26/10/2020

Labour – work, especially physical work; work hard; make great effort; expenditure of physical or mental effort especially when difficult or compulsory; have difficulty in doing something despite working hard; a particular job or task, especially of a difficult nature; the amount of physical, mental, and social effort used to produce goods and services in an economy; the process or effort of childbirth or the time during which this takes place.


Sowell says

26/10/2020


Rural round-up

26/10/2020

GE bogged down by ambiguous rules – Richard Rennie:

Over a year after the Royal Society Te Aparangi report on genetic engineering called for an overhaul on regulations, New Zealand continues to lack a framework that can accommodate the rapidly advancing technology.

Dr David Penman, who was co-chair on the society’s investigating panel, told delegates at this year’s gene editing forum there was too much focus on the processes behind gene engineering (GE), rather than taking an outcome-based approach to what it could deliver.

“The regulation needs to be proportionate to the risk. For example, mutagenesis, using radiation to find gene mutations is not genetic engineering, but targeted gene editing is,” he said.

He says there also remained an enormous diversity of acts that scientists and researchers have to pick through when contemplating such technology.  . . 

Farmers must lead regen ag debate – Gerald Piddock:

New Zealand farmers risk having regenerative agriculture defined for them if they do not take ownership of the debate around its meaning.

Alpha Food Labs founder and co-chief executive Mike Lee says that could lead to an unfavourable definition forced on them and farmers losing control of the narrative.

Speaking at an NZX-Beef + Lamb NZ webinar on what regenerative agriculture meant for New Zealand, the US-based food strategist says the debate over what regenerative agriculture is must be a producer-led movement.

He says rather than thinking about the term, people should think about their mental framework around leaving the earth in a better way than when they got here. . . 

Tradie farmer living her dream – Cheyenne Nicholson:

A Waikato farmer is thriving on the challenge of a new dairying career alongside a successful lighting business. Cheyenne Nicholson reports.

OKOROIRE dairy farmer Laura Mitchell is all about tackling a challenge. And, growing a successful business during a pandemic is definitely that. Throw in a new career path in dairying and raising her three-year-old daughter Amber, and you could say Laura has her hands full.

The idea of being a farmer herself was never really on her radar despite always being drawn to the land and growing up on her parents dairy farm. At 16, she decided school wasn’t for her anymore and opted to leave and gain qualifications in a trade. . . 

Tales of the land girls shared at Maungati – Simon Edwards:

Among the crowd of more than 120 who travelled to Maungati, near Timaru, on Sunday to remember the World War II ‘land girls’ were two particularly special guests – Sadie Lietze (nee Stuart) and Daphne Attfield (nee Williams).

Now in their late 90s, the pair represented the last of the ranks of the New Zealand Women’s Land Service (WLS).  Like Joan Butland of Auckland, whose health didn’t permit her to make the trip south, they were among the more than 2,700 young women aged 17 to their early 20s – many of them from the cities – who in the 1940s kept farms and orchards going when men were called up to fight.  Their efforts were crucial in an era when New Zealand was still the offshore farm of Britain and locals as well as tens of thousands of American servicemen in the Pacific needed to be fed. . . 

Made with Care: Great cheese needs great milk:

With one and a half decades of experience in cheese making, Cathy Lang knows her stuff when it comes to cheese and is excited to be involved in NZ Trade and Enterprise’s international “Made with Care” campaign.

The campaign is designed to grow awareness, preference and demand for New Zealand food and beverage products by demonstrating the care we take when we produce them.

Now more than ever, amid a global health pandemic, consumers are looking for safe, nutritious and premium quality food and beverage that is ethically produced and tastes good too. New Zealand’s combination of exceptional natural resources and experienced food producers, like Cathy, sets us apart and perfectly positions us to meet the needs of consumers. . . 

Can cattle grazing be good for the environment? – Eric Tegethoff:

 The ancient plains of Montana once hosted herds of animals that grazed the land. Now, cattle and other domesticated animals do that work.

According to former environmental lawyer and author Nicolette Hahn Niman, the planet actually is grazed far less than it used to be. Her book “Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production” explores the benefits of raising cattle and the positive effects it can have on the land – when it’s done correctly.

“Rather than so much attention being paid to the negative impacts of cattle when they’re poorly managed,” she said, “we should be focusing on the tremendous benefits of well-managed grazing.”

Cattle ranching has been criticized by some as contributing to climate change. However, Hahn Niman said, well-managed grazing can improve soil health and even help sequester carbon dioxide. She said it also can help keep water in the soil. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

26/10/2020


Focus on quality reduce quantity

26/10/2020

The IMF is forecasting a gloomy outlook for New Zealand:

Fresh numbers show the Labour-led administration was a big spender even before Covid-19 and New Zealand incomes overall in 2025 might be less than in 2019. . .

The government inherited forecasts of healthy surpluses and squandered them, before Covid-19 struck.

The IMF also forecasts that New Zealand’s real GDP per capita in 2025 will still be lower than in 2019. Only four “advanced economies” have the same dire outlook. By comparison, Japan hovers near the median with a 3.9 per cent increase while Australia is projected to be up by 2.7 per cent.

In 2019, 25 of the 39 IMF’s “advanced economies” had higher average incomes per capita than New Zealand. By 2025 it will be 32 countries. Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore are now much more prosperous than New Zealand. Even the Irish now have more than twice New Zealand’s per capita income.

What does this mean for Kiwis? It will be harder to afford what other countries can. It also means that Kiwis’ standard of living depends greatly on the quality of government spending. . .

This isn’t just numbers, it is what we can, or can’t, afford to spend on education, health, welfare, infrastructure and all other services the government provides.

When Bill English was Finance Minister he focused on the quality of spending rather than the amount. For the last three years the government has spent a lot more with little if any concern for the effectiveness of the spending.

What can be said about the quality of all that government spending?

Unfortunately, rigorous assessments of value for money in government spending are rare. What is not measured and is difficult is unlikely to be achieved. The Provincial Growth Fund was a particular disgrace but whimsical promises to plant a billion trees or build 100,000 houses without proper justification illustrate the genre. . .

The PGF and billion trees were New Zealand First’s policies and that party is, thankfully, no longer in parliament. But KiwiBuild was a Labour policy. That it was an expensive failure is no guarantee that we’ll be safe from ill-considered mistakes like that in this term.

When all the money being spent is being borrowed it is even more important to focus on the quality of spending and wherever possible reduce the quantity.


Word of the day

25/10/2020

Agastopia – admiration or love of a particular part of someone’s body.


Milne muses

25/10/2020


Rural round-up

25/10/2020

Precision tech helps farmer get it right :

Mid-Canterbury arable and dairy farmer Craige Mackenzie’s philosophy is right input, right quantity, right place, right time — which makes sense for his business and for the land, waterways and climate.

Conditions often aren’t in his favour, but precision technology is helping to even the odds.

Getting to grips with highly variable weather and soil quality is a constant challenge on Craige Mackenzie’s cropping and dairy farm, near Methven, in Mid-Canterbury.

However, precision technology is proving a powerful ally.  . . 

Federated Farmers query references to indigenous fish in plan change – Matthew Littlewood:

Federated Farmers has asked that a wide-ranging plan change setting water use rules for South Canterbury remove all references to the protection of “indigenous fish”.

Environment Canterbury’s Proposed Plan Change 7 (PC7), which sets the limits for water quality, with particular focus on the Orari-Temuka-Opihi-Pareora (Otop) catchment, is now going through the hearings process.

The proposed plan has received 560 submissions.

At the hearings held at the Grosvenor Hotel in Timaru, on Tuesday, the farming lobby group addressed many of the proposed rules and regulations of PC7, with speakers to the submission including Federated Farmers’ South Canterbury president Jason Grant, past provincial president Ivon Hurst, farmer Peter Bonifacio and senior policy advisor Dr Lionel Hume. . . 

Sustainable approach helps boost productivity :

An East Coast farm is enjoying a dramatic increase in productivity, despite retiring 10% of the land – proving that farming sustainably doesn’t have to come at an economic cost.

Since 2015 when they started managing Puketitiri sheep and beef farm Taramoa – located midway between Taupo and Hastings – Dan and Billie Herries have continued the previous managers’ devotion to enhancing its biodiversity. 

Their hard work was recognised with a suite of awards in the 2020 East Coast Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

More than 20,000 native plants have been planted, all waterways have been fenced and a comprehensive predator trapping network now covers the whole property. . . 

‘Phenomenal’ restoration of Milford Track for summer hiking – Tess Brunton:

Crews in remote Fiordland have been working hard to restore the Milford Track against a looming deadline.

The Great Walk was badly damaged when a metre of rain fell in less than three days in early February, causing widespread flooding, landslips and stranding hundreds of people.

In May, $13.7 million was earmarked to help the Department of Conservation (DOC) repair flood damaged tracks and other infrastructure.

DOC has set its sights on reopening the Milford Track this summer with all places booked out within an hour of bookings opening. . . 

Waikato Milking Systems enters domestic and international small ruminants industry:

A leading developer and manufacturer of dairy technology is moving to help New Zealand farmers switch over to the emerging dairy sheep and dairy goat industries.

Waikato Milking Systems recently commissioned three small ruminant milking parlours in the central North Island to farmers who are among the first independent commercial suppliers of goat and sheep milk in the country.

It included a 40-bail inline rapid exit sheep milking plant for Green Park Sheep near Te Awamutu, a 40-bail inline rapid exit for Schuler Brothers at Te Aroha and an internal 70-bail sheep rotary plant installed for Browne Pastoral near Cambridge. . . 

Plant pathologist Pamela Ronald Named GCHERA World Agriculture Prize Laureate award Recognizes exceptional lifetime achievement in agriculture – Amy Quinton:

Pamela Ronald, distinguished professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of California, Davis, and with the UC Davis Genome Center, has been named a 2020 World Agriculture Prize laureate by the Global Confederation of Higher Education Associations for Agricultural and Life Sciences, or GCHERA. She becomes the first woman whose work is recognized by the award.

“This award is a really special honor and I’m very grateful,” said Ronald. “I’m happy to be part of a global community of agricultural scientists that has been able to make a huge difference in the lives of farmers.”

The award ceremony will be virtually held at 5 p.m. on Nov. 30 from Nanjing Agricultural University, Jiangsu Province, China. GCHERA also jointly named Professor Zhang Fusuo of China Agricultural University a laureate this year. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

25/10/2020


Self-kindness inside grief (and any other kind of hardship)

25/10/2020

Megan Devine on self kindness:

Being kind to yourself is one of the hardest things to do. OTHER people might deserve kindness and compassion, but you? You know too much about yourself – the things you did and didn’t do, the ways you failed or didn’t try hard enough – to ever be kind. Let’s find a way around this, okay? For all you’ve had to live, you deserve kindness. . . 

Megan Devine’s Refuge in Grief is one of the most helpful resources I have come across.

You can find it here.


Sunday soapbox

25/10/2020

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

You can cut all the flowers but you cannot stop spring form coming. – Pablo Neruda

 

 


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