Celebrating International Rural Women’s Day

15/10/2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Word of the day

15/10/2020

Anabatic – (of a wind) caused by local upward motion of warm air; of a warm wind which blows up a steep slope or mountain side, driven by heating of the slope through insolation; pertaining to an uphill wind produced by the effects of local heating; pertaining to any upward-moving air current.


Sowell says

15/10/2020


Rural round-up

15/10/2020

Three years after the Morrinsville protest, farmers reveal if views have changed – Andrew McRae:

Five days before the 2017 election, 500 people took part in a protest in the Waikato town of Morrinsville complaining about how farmers were being treated. So, have feelings changed?

The 2017 protest was advertised as not being political, but the number of National and New Zealand First signs, and a lack of red and green made that an empty claim.

Morrinsville was selected as it was the home town of Labour’s then-new leader, Jacinda Ardern.

On the day, Lloyd Downing, one of the organisers, did not dispute who was the target, saying the politics of a Labour-Greens alliance was going to be “extremely difficult” for farming. . . 

Grower warns fruit will ‘rot on the ground’ as border remains shut to pickers :

A South Auckland grower says hundreds of tonnes of produce will “rot on the ground” and prices will be driven up at the checkout if borders remain closed to fruit pickers from overseas..

Immigration New Zealand has granted border exceptions to some offshore musicians to participate in a winery tour this summer. Measures have also been made to accomodate the Australian rugby team, the English netball team, the West Indies and Pakistan cricket teams, and the America’s Cup teams.

But for experienced seasonal fruit pickers, even from Covid-19-free Samoa, New Zealand’s border remains shut.

Founder of South Auckland-based strawberry grower Perrys Berrys, Francine Perry, told TVNZ1’s Breakfast this morning the move was putting at risk hundreds of tonnes of fresh fruit and hundreds of jobs for Kiwis. . .

Fonterra farmers taking another step towards New Zealand’s low emissions food production:

They’re hot off the press and intended to help take the heat out of climate change.

Fonterra farmers are already among the world’s most sustainable producers of milk and now have an additional tool in their sustainability toolbox.

Over the last few days, Fonterra farmers have been receiving unique Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions profiles for their farms – the first time such a tool has been introduced in New Zealand at scale. The profiles form part of a Farm Environmental Report – which combines a GHG Report and Nitrogen Risk Scorecard.

Fonterra Director On-Farm Excellence, Charlotte Rutherford, says the reports are designed to provide useful insights for farmers to help identify opportunities for improvements on farm – providing indicators such as the estimated level of biological methane and nitrous oxide emissions per hectare, and the amount of emissions per kilogram of milk solids. . . 

Avocado exports drop amid air freight capacity woes :

Avocado exports appear to be the latest Covid-casualty due to shrinking air freight capacity.

Figures from Auckland Airport for August, the traditional start of the avocado export season, show an almost 60 percent drop in avocados sent by air to overseas markets compared to the same month in 2019.

Auckland Airport Aeronautical Commercial manager Scott Tasker said air exports to Korea and Thailand were particularly hard hit.

“That’s really reflecting a crunch in air freight capacity into those markets.” . . 

Colin McGillivray, 86, is still shearing sheep in regional Victoria after 70 years

At the ripe old age of 86, shearer Colin McGillivray from Gunbower, west of Echuca, has no plans to hang up the clippers.

He started shearing sheep in the late 1940s and — seven decades later — his love for the job is stronger than ever.

“It was dry as hell back then; there was no feed,” Mr McGillivray said, as he reminisced about his early days on sheep stations.

He recalls that on his first day on the job, he found himself shearing sheep alongside one of the world’s best, Kevin Sarre, who went on to become a five-time national champion, winner of the world’s premier shearing honour, the Golden Shears, and held the world shearing record in 1965 after taking the wool off 346 merinos. . .

Forest, frogs and film stars, renowned southern nature resort goes up for sale:

A South Island resort on a world-renowned scenic highway, whose guests include TV stars and international film crews, has been put up for sale.

The Whistling Frog restaurant and accommodation complex lies in the heart of one of New Zealand’s top nature-tourism destinations, the 56,000-hectare Catlins Conservation Park.

Famous guests have included British comedian Bill Bailey, Neil Oliver from the BBC Coast Series and Oscar-winner Bret McKenzie of Flight of the Conchords. . . 


Yes Sir Humphrey

15/10/2020


More debt or higher taxes?

15/10/2020

Labour policy is offering voters two bad choices:

Labour’s inability to control their spending means they will either drown New Zealand in a sea of debt or burden hardworking New Zealanders with higher taxes, National’s Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

“Labour have a track record of failing to control their spending. When they came to office they said they would spend an additional $1.9 billion in Budget 2019. In actual fact, they blew their Budget and ended up spending an extra $3.8 billion.

“That one failure alone means Government debt will be more than $20 billion higher by 2030. That is irresponsible and reckless.

“A Government that can’t control its spending will inevitably come after New Zealanders for more tax.

“The choice under Labour is clear: higher taxes to pay for all of the uncontrolled spending, or an economy that drowns in a sea of debt.

The sensible course for individuals and businesses facing tough financial times,  is to look at what’s essential and what’s not. Governments should do the same.

There hasn’t been a single sign from this government, or the election policies of the parties forming it, that recognise that let alone plan to do it.

“There is a better alternative.

“National will take a more disciplined approach to Government spending. We will eliminate waste such as Fees Free and KiwiBuild, we will be more careful with new spending each year, and we will put a halt to nice-to-have spending such as contributions to the NZ Super Fund.

“Our plan will restore debt to 36 per cent of GDP by 2034, compared to 48 per cent under Labour. And we will balance the budget and return to surplus by 2028 compared to never ending deficits under Labour.

“Future generations do not deserve to inherit an economy crippled with higher debt and higher taxes because Labour can’t control its spending.

“We need to stop the waste, stimulate the economy with short term tax relief, and trust Kiwis to grow their businesses and create jobs.”

This government wasn’t able to deliver most of its pledges from the last election when it had surpluses and before Covid-19 struck.

Why would anyone trust them to do it now debt is high and growing and while Covid-19 is still very much part of the problem?


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