Kupu o te ra

17/09/2020

Tika –  to be correct, true; upright; right; just, fair; accurate; appropriate; lawful; proper; valid.

To celebrate Wiki o te Reo Maori.


Sowell says

17/09/2020


Rural round-up

17/09/2020

Rethink needed:

Environment minister David Parker has had a long and tempestuous relationship with the farming sector.

His latest fight with farmers has come about due to the new freshwater regulations that recently came into force. Especially aggrieved are southern farmers who have pointed out that many of the new rules concerning winter cropping were “almost unfarmable” in the south.

Southland Federated Farmers president Geoffrey Young even called on farmers in the region to ignore the new requirements on getting resource consents for winter grazing until there was more practicality concerning it. This got Parker’s goat and he came out of hiding to decry Young’s call saying that “no one was above the law”.  . . 

Waikato A&P Show cancelled due to uncertainty around Covid-19 – Maja Burry:

The Waikato A&P Show, due to get underway late next month, has been cancelled due to the uncertainty around Covid-19.

The event was meant kick off in Hamilton on 30 October, marking its 128th year.

Showing Waikato said uncertainty about the Covid-19 alert levels which would apply on the traditional dates meant instead it would be holding a handful of small events open to competitors only.

There would also be an inaugural National Online Show involving other A&P show associations. . . 

Local Government NZ’s manifesto asks the right questions:

Local Government New Zealand is spot on when it says that all political parties’ policies should be assessed on how well they provide for local voices to be heard and taken into account, Federated Farmers says.

“We agree that central government policy and legislation must be able to be tailored for the differing needs, circumstances, capacity and capability of local communities,” Feds national board member Chris Allen says.

Federated Farmers also agrees with the assertion in the LGNZ manifesto released today that successive governments have placed too much weight on the use of top-down, one-size-fits all solutions. . . 

Kiwi dairy innovation leading the way:

Dairy is New Zealand’s top earner following the impact of COVID on tourism and education. Much now rests on the shoulders of busy farmers, some of whom are still struggling to get key staff back through New Zealand’s borders.

Annual breeding is a key pressure-point in the dairy calendar that requires skill and experience. A local Hamilton company is now attracting global attention for an imaginative solution to a perennial farming headache.

Kiwi dairy farmers need to know exactly when to artificially inseminate cows. FlashMate was created to stick to cow hair during the breeding period to interpret cow behaviour. The red light comes on at just the right moment when the cow is on heat and the unit is easily removed after breeding without bothering cows. “Reading body language when you have as many as 1,200 cows isn’t easy” says Matt Yallop, one of the creators of FlashMate. . . 

NZ Plant Producers issues its manifesto for the 2020 election:

Our organisation represents more than 100 plant producers who produce the plants growing food Kiwis eat and export, regenerating New Zealand’s forests, beautifying our urban landscapes, and being planted by millions of Kiwis in their backyards.

New Zealand Plant Producers is a voluntary organisation with more than 100 plant producer members, comprising New Zealand’s most respected nursery leaders and businesses. While our work benefits all New Zealand plant producers, it is funded by our members as proof of their commitment to our industry and the benefits it produces for New Zealand’s economy and well-being.

This election we raise eight issues which much be addressed so our members can continue to thrive and produce the plants New Zealand so badly needs. . . 

Pacific seasonal workers could be a lifeline for horticulture:

John Fiso, Chairman of the Pacific Cooperation Foundation (PCF), believes New Zealand can achieve a win-win by providing financial support for Pacific people from neighbouring island nations to head to New Zealand and help our horticultural sector in the upcoming fruit picking season.

“Our brothers and sisters in the Pacific islands are struggling for income due to the collapse of tourism in the region, this is a way to help them – and help our growers who are extremely concerned about labour shortages,” says Mr Fiso.

New Zealand is heading into a busy summer fruit season with a shortage of 60,000 workers. The impact of this on the economy could be $9.5 billion according to New Zealand Apples and Pears.

“Bringing seasonal workers in from the Pacific could be a win-win for the severely short staffed orchardists and fruit growers of New Zealand, and the people struggling in the Pacific,” says Mr Fiso. “The reality is, bringing in the Pacific workers would be hugely beneficial for humanitarian reasons in the Pacific and at the same time prevents millions of dollars of produce in New Zealand going to waste.” . .


Decade of deficits

17/09/2020

Treasury is forecasting more than a decade of deficits:

With deficits projected out to 2033/34, there needs to be urgent action from all political parties on addressing the national debt, says the New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union. 

Taxpayers’ Union Campaigns Manager Louis Houlbrooke says “After many years of prudent fiscal management from National and Labour, it Treasury is now projecting 15 years of deficits in a row. As a result, net debt will be $31 billion higher – or $17,000 a household – in 2033/34 compared to the Budget 2020 projection. The Government needs to give us a credible path back to surplus rather than leaving taxpayers on the hook for a never-ending accumulation of debt.”

“The major reason for the more than a decade of deficits ahead is Treasury’s belief that our economic recovery from Covid-19 will be more anaemic than previously expected. The message is clear: our recent track-record of weak economic growth isn’t just hurting incomes and entrepreneurship; it’s going to have a serious impact on our public debt.

“The solution to the forecast decade of deficits is to cut wasteful spending, end regulatory taxes on business which stifle growth and employment, and deliver modest tax relief to households and employers to get the economy growing again.” 

It’s 12 years since Treasury last forecast a decade of deficits.

That was when a Labour-led government propped up by New Zealand First was on its last legs. It was also before the global financial crisis hit.

National came to power and in spite of the GFC and Canterbury earthquakes, returned to surplus in less than 10 years.

Who will you trust to turn the Treasury forecast round this time – the government that squandered the surplus and had the country back in deficit before Covid-19 hit, or a National-led government that understands that the quality of spending is far more important than the quantity?

Today’s Pre-election Economic and Fiscal Update forecasts a longer and more painful economic crisis than earlier forecast and requires a serious growth plan to get New Zealand back on track, National Party Leader Judith Collins and Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith say.

“Our economy is forecast to have shrunk by 16 per cent in the June quarter, and we will be taking on even more debt, an extra $200 billion. Every dollar and cent of this will have to be paid back by our children and grandchildren,” Ms Collins says.

“Unemployment will be substantially worse in 2022 and 2023. Treasury predicts 100,000 more New Zealanders will lose their jobs in the next two years.

That’s more than 10,000 more than the total population of Palmerston North.

“The Minister of Finance shouldn’t try to sugar coat these figures. He has taken a rose-tinted glasses view at a dreadful picture that cannot be described as anything other than catastrophic. Any short-term improvement on the Budget forecasts is far outweighed by the worsening picture past 2021.

“The contrast between Treasury’s estimate of more than 16 per cent contraction in our economy in the June quarter compared with 7 per cent in Australia shows he should be careful about making comparisons,” Ms Collins says.

“Grant Robertson’s only plan is higher taxes, and no country has ever taxed its way out of a recession, and this a huge one,” Mr Goldsmith says.

“Treasury is forecasting that under Labour New Zealand will be in deficit every year for at least the next 15 years. Grant Robertson and his Government have no plan to get New Zealand back into surplus. Ever.

“New Zealanders have a choice for our economic recovery: more government programmes, welfare and costs for business under Labour or lower taxes, more business investment and quality infrastructure under National.

“National has a comprehensive plan to secure our border and prevent New Zealand from yo-yoing in and out of lockdown. Effective border management, coupled with common sense and pragmatism around the rules, is an important aspect to help our economy can recover.

“We will do everything we can to make it easier for businesses to hire – 90 day trials, flexible employment laws, low taxes and innovative policies like JobStart and BusinessStart.

“Our economic plan of job friendly policies and investment in quality infrastructure will grow our economy, give businesses the confidence to grow and restore household incomes for New Zealanders,” Mr Goldsmith says.

“National will release our fiscal plan soon which will carefully balance the need to inject stimulus, increase investment in core public services and restore Government debt back to prudent levels,” Ms Collins says.

We couldn’t afford the current government before Covid-19 hit, we certainly can’t afford another three years of mismanagement.

 


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