Kupu o te ra

16/09/2020

Tau o te ate – heart-strings, deep emotion, feelings; soul mate, lover, partner, darling.

To celebrate Wiki o te Reo Maori.


Sowell says

16/09/2020


Rural round-up

16/09/2020

Greens warned fertiliser tax will ‘create pressure on farmers’ :

The Green Party is being warned that a fertiliser levy is not a solution to more sustainable farming.

The Greens unveiled its agriculture policy in Canterbury at the weekend, where the party announced its plans to levy nitrogen and phosphorus fertiliser sales.

They also want to establish an almost $300 million fund for the transition to regenerative and organic farming.

Environmental consultant Dave Ashby runs a dairy farm in North Canterbury.

Keeping animals fenced out, planting along the banks and adding oxygen weed are just a few of the measures he takes to keep his waterways clean.

To prove how clean the water is at his man-made drain he took a handful and drank it. . . 

Independently assessed candidates for Fonterra Board of Directors’ election announced:

Incumbent Director Brent Goldsack, along with Nathan Guy, Cathy Quinn and Mike O’Connor have been announced as the Independently Assessed Candidates for the 2020 Fonterra Farmer Directors’ election. This year there are two Board positions up for election.

Nathan Guy, Mike O’Connor and Cathy Quinn were recommended by the Independent Selection Panel after their assessment process.

Incumbent Director Brent Goldsack is seeking re-election and chose to participate in the Independent Assessment Process. The Panel’s assessment of Brent will be included in the voting pack and as a re-standing Director he automatically goes through to the ballot. . .

Farm worker shows what folk with disabilities can do – George Clark:

A South Canterbury-based farm hand hopes to shed light on people with disabilities who have been overlooked for employment.

Timaru’s David Hanford Boyes has no balance and requires a walking stick to move.

While picking fruit in Australia in 1996, he was swept off a ladder by a branch and fell to the ground, crushing three vertebrae in his back.

Mr Hanford Boyes said he was lucky to have leading surgeons in Melbourne at the time offering a surgery not before tried on humans. . . 

Sharing his passion for dairy farming – Mary-Jo Tohill:

Telford dairy farm manager John Thornley has played a key role in getting the first GoDairy course under way at the Southern Institute of Technology Telford campus. He has first-hand knowledge of making a career change, as Mary-Jo Tohill reports.

After going from cook to cow cocky, Telford dairy farm manager John Thornley can relate to change.

He played a key role in getting the first GoDairy course under way at the Southern Institute of Technology (SIT) Telford campus near Balclutha last month, and said he got a real kick out of seeing the 13 people taking part make big changes to their lives.

“They’re like a breath of fresh air and they’re wanting to learn all they can about dairying.” . . 

New director will help push for smarter farming:

Intellectual property lawyer and farm owner Jane Montgomery is Ravensdown’s newest shareholder-elected director, announced at yesterday’s 2020 annual meeting.

Christchurch-based Jane owns a farm in North Canterbury and has been elected as director of Area 3, which extends from Selwyn to the top of the South Island and includes the West Coast.

Ravensdown Chair John Henderson says Jane’s new perspective will be important as the co-operative and its shareholders tackle opportunities and challenges in a volatile world. . . 

 

Commission releases final report on Fonterra’s milk price:

The Commerce Commission has today released its final report on Fonterra’s base milk price calculation for the 2019/20 dairy season.

The base milk price is the average price Fonterra sets for raw milk supplied by farmers, which is currently forecast to be $7.10 – $7.20 per kilogram of milk solids for the 2019/20 dairy season.

The Commission is required to review the calculation at the end of each dairy season under the milk price monitoring regime in the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA). The regime is designed to provide Fonterra with incentives to set the base milk price consistent with efficient and contestable market outcomes. . . 

 

 


Shareholders should be first call

16/09/2020

The Taxpayers’ Union says the taxpayer funded lolly scramble for tourism ventures is morally wrong:

New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union spokesman Louis Houlbrooke says, “The latest round of funding by the Government’s COVID-19 tourism rescue package demonstrates how completely arbitrary, unfair, and wasteful this corporate welfare programme is.”

“The lucky recipients include river cruise companies, spa resorts, and helicopter tour operators. While we’re sure these companies have struggled with effects of the pandemic, so have their competitors who aren’t getting handouts.”

“While 130 applicants were successful, another 170 were turned down, and many more potential applicants would have lacked the knowledge or confidence to navigate the bureaucratic grant process. When politicians give taxpayer money to select grant applicants, they distort the market, rewarding companies that devote resources to impressing bureaucrats, and making it easier for those companies to put their self-sufficient competitors out of business. That’s not just wasteful, it’s morally repugnant.”

“We’re calling on all political parties to pledge an end to ad hoc COVID handouts, and instead introduce fairer, less discriminating measures. For example, a temporary cut to GST could motivate New Zealanders to bring forward their holiday plans and spend more. Alternatively, lower excise tax on petrol could make the Kiwi road trip great again.”

A government who took seriously the knowledge that every cent it’s spending is borrowed would not be throwing money at businesses in this way.

Most businesses involved in tourism will have been, and continue to be, hard hit by the impacts of Covid-19 and our closed borders. That isn’t an excuse for giving some money that allows them to compete unfairly with others that missed out on, or didn’t apply for, grants.

What will the money do and what will the businesses do if/when it runs out and the border is still closed?

The responsibility for the viability of these companies is first and foremost that of their shareholders, not taxpayers.


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