Rural round-up

It’s been a great year for the dairy industry – now let’s see what it has done for Fonterra’s books – Point of Order:

Despite  the  turmoil  inflicted  on  global markets,  NZ’s  dairy  industry  turned  in  a  phenomenal performance   for  the  2019-20 season,   with  export  earnings   $709m  ahead of  the  previous  year.  

And  though  the  global  market  is  finely  balanced  at  present,  the  prospect  is  that  the  industry  could  again  be  ahead  of the  pack  in  the  current  season.

Dairy farmers    deserve  the  plaudits  of  the   rest  of  the  country,  even   though  the  present   government    has  gone  out  of its  way  to   clobber  the industry  with  tough  freshwater regulations  designed to  satisfy  “dirty dairying”   critics,  despite the most polluted water  often being  found in  city and town waterways  and harbours.  . . 

Horticultural industry pushes for extended visas for workers

The horticultural sector is calling for its guest workers to be next in line to have their visa restrictions eased.

Visitors and temporary migrants trapped in this country by the restrictions on travel will now have their visas extended to give them more time to organise flights home.

But Horticulture NZ chief executive Mike Chapman said these changes did little to help people working in the horticultural and wine sectors.

He said the sector was coming up to a busy time. . . 

The immigration breakthrough that wasn’t– Dileepa Fonseka :

Lobby groups thought they’d succeeded in their mission to let skilled workers who had been stranded overseas get back into the country – but they were wrong

A press release from primary industry lobby groups had to be retracted on Friday after an announcement they had expected on a way for overseas temporary migrants to return to New Zealand never materialised.

DairyNZ and Federated Farmers released – then retracted – a press statement welcoming back the temporary workers ‘locked out’ of the country, after the Government instead announced a visa extension for people here on visitor visas. . . 

Plea to lock up dogs at night after lambs killed – Gus Patterson:

Maheno farmer Doug Brown is urging people to lock up their dogs at night after 12 of his lambs were killed earlier this week.

The attacks on the nights of August 30 and 31 caused fatal injuries to several lambs, as well as mis-mothering and scattering the recently-born stock.

Some lambs were found three paddocks away from their mothers.

“It’s annoying. You work long hours at lambing time and could do without this,” Mr Brown said. . . 

Working off-farm best for rural mum – Alice Scott:

Waitahuna’s Bridget Tweed still cringes when she recalls her first job interview after what had been four years as a stay-at-home mum with pre-schooler twins, a toddler and a baby.

“I stumbled my way through the entire interview. I just wasn’t used to talking to adults anymore. The whole interview was just terrible.”

She got home and after some thought decided to call the manager.

“I said I felt the interview hadn’t gone too great and I hadn’t given a true reflection of myself. The manager actually agreed it wasn’t the greatest interview, but I rattled off a few things and I must’ve said the right thing because I got the job,” she said laughing. . . 

Bargains in the bin may bring buyers out – Bruce McLeish,:

As anticipated, the wool market struggled again last week and prices dropped by 37 cents a kilogram – or 5.5 per cent – in US Dollar terms.

A weaker US Dollar continued to make life difficult for growers and exporters as the Australian Dollar briefly cracked the US0.74 cents level during the week.

Understandably, 20 per cent of the offering was passed in – with many growers unwilling to accept these prices. . . 

One Response to Rural round-up

  1. Gravedodger says:

    “despite the most polluted water often being found in city and town waterways and harbours. . .

    We will leave that unfortunate fact where it lies further polluting its host environment, inconvenient and too hard to find anyone to blame and hence pay to clean it up.

    After all all the city voters where the toxic melons score can easily drive by a dairyfarm and criticise, forgetting all the while the pollution and environmental damage just wrought using the car, the tires, the fuel and next time Sage, Davidson or Shaw fly in to assist with our paranoid wailing we can be so sanctimonious and superior as to how it is we the Toxic melons who will save it all using the taxes contributed to by that dirty dairy farming as funding!!!

    Like

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