Word of the day

10/09/2020

Armipotent – mighty or powerful in battle; strong in arms or war.


Sowell says

10/09/2020


Rural round-up

10/09/2020

It’s been a great year for the dairy industry – now let’s see what it has done for Fonterra’s books – Point of Order:

Despite  the  turmoil  inflicted  on  global markets,  NZ’s  dairy  industry  turned  in  a  phenomenal performance   for  the  2019-20 season,   with  export  earnings   $709m  ahead of  the  previous  year.  

And  though  the  global  market  is  finely  balanced  at  present,  the  prospect  is  that  the  industry  could  again  be  ahead  of the  pack  in  the  current  season.

Dairy farmers    deserve  the  plaudits  of  the   rest  of  the  country,  even   though  the  present   government    has  gone  out  of its  way  to   clobber  the industry  with  tough  freshwater regulations  designed to  satisfy  “dirty dairying”   critics,  despite the most polluted water  often being  found in  city and town waterways  and harbours.  . . 

Horticultural industry pushes for extended visas for workers

The horticultural sector is calling for its guest workers to be next in line to have their visa restrictions eased.

Visitors and temporary migrants trapped in this country by the restrictions on travel will now have their visas extended to give them more time to organise flights home.

But Horticulture NZ chief executive Mike Chapman said these changes did little to help people working in the horticultural and wine sectors.

He said the sector was coming up to a busy time. . . 

The immigration breakthrough that wasn’t– Dileepa Fonseka :

Lobby groups thought they’d succeeded in their mission to let skilled workers who had been stranded overseas get back into the country – but they were wrong

A press release from primary industry lobby groups had to be retracted on Friday after an announcement they had expected on a way for overseas temporary migrants to return to New Zealand never materialised.

DairyNZ and Federated Farmers released – then retracted – a press statement welcoming back the temporary workers ‘locked out’ of the country, after the Government instead announced a visa extension for people here on visitor visas. . . 

Plea to lock up dogs at night after lambs killed – Gus Patterson:

Maheno farmer Doug Brown is urging people to lock up their dogs at night after 12 of his lambs were killed earlier this week.

The attacks on the nights of August 30 and 31 caused fatal injuries to several lambs, as well as mis-mothering and scattering the recently-born stock.

Some lambs were found three paddocks away from their mothers.

“It’s annoying. You work long hours at lambing time and could do without this,” Mr Brown said. . . 

Working off-farm best for rural mum – Alice Scott:

Waitahuna’s Bridget Tweed still cringes when she recalls her first job interview after what had been four years as a stay-at-home mum with pre-schooler twins, a toddler and a baby.

“I stumbled my way through the entire interview. I just wasn’t used to talking to adults anymore. The whole interview was just terrible.”

She got home and after some thought decided to call the manager.

“I said I felt the interview hadn’t gone too great and I hadn’t given a true reflection of myself. The manager actually agreed it wasn’t the greatest interview, but I rattled off a few things and I must’ve said the right thing because I got the job,” she said laughing. . . 

Bargains in the bin may bring buyers out – Bruce McLeish,:

As anticipated, the wool market struggled again last week and prices dropped by 37 cents a kilogram – or 5.5 per cent – in US Dollar terms.

A weaker US Dollar continued to make life difficult for growers and exporters as the Australian Dollar briefly cracked the US0.74 cents level during the week.

Understandably, 20 per cent of the offering was passed in – with many growers unwilling to accept these prices. . . 


Fiddling while country burns

10/09/2020

Labour’s following its base instinct with its tax policy:

No country in the world has ever taxed itself out of recession, but Labour’s first instinct is to raise your taxes, National’s Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

“Today Grant Robertson wouldn’t say if his tax policy is a bottom line in any coalition negotiations with the Greens, leaving the door wide open for other tax increases.

“If Grant Robertson is true to his word, then he will make no other tax increases a bottom line.

“This is just the beginning. Labour will eventually widen the net and come after middle income earners.

“Labour has predictably gone back to old habits after the failure of its Capital Gains tax this term.

“It opens a door for tax avoidance that we haven’t seen for many years, which brings into question Grant Robertson’s revenue estimates.

“National won’t increase taxes and won’t introduce any new taxes.”

Labour’s plan is to impose a new top marginal tax rate of 39% on income earned over $180,000.

It says it will bring in $550 million a year.

It won’t.

Instead it will create work for accountants and lawyers as people find ways to get round it.

Even if it did, it would be a tiny contribution to the public coffers in contrast to the billions that are being borrowed.

We don’t need fiddling with tax rates while the country burns with debt.

We need plans for economic growth which is the only way to put out the fire.


Time for SFO update

10/09/2020

In April the Serious Fraud Office said it was on track to make a call before this year’s election on whether to lay charges in relation to the New Zealand First Foundation.

. . . In a rare statement today, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), which normally gives little away, laid out its timetable for the investigation, which has faced challenges because of the Covid-19 lockdown.

“The SFO’s pre-lockdown timetable for the investigation in relation to the New Zealand First Foundation would see us completing the investigation before the September election date,” director Julie Read said.

“At this stage, we are progressing the investigation under the current lockdown restrictions and are still on track to complete it within that timeframe.”

However the logistical challenges of the lockdown meant the SFO could not set an exact date.

“Our actual completion date will be dependent upon our ability to conduct certain interviews as well as other tasks which can only be completed at lower alert levels and the cooperation of those who hold information relevant to our investigation.” . . 

Had the election still been on the original date of September 19 early voting would already have started.

Since the election was postponed by a month, early voting will now start on October 3.

That’s only 3 1/2 weeks away.

It’s time the SFO gave an update on its investigations and when it is likely to announce whether or not any charges will be laid.


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