Word of the day

09/09/2020

Dan – any of ten degrees of advanced proficiency in judo or karate; a degree of expertise in karate, judo, tae kwon do, etc., usually signified by the wearing of a cloth belt of a particular color; level: a sixth-degree dan; a person who has achieved a dan.


Sowell says

09/09/2020


Rural round-up

09/09/2020

Fonterra maintains forecast despite latest GDT fall – Gerald Piddock:

Fonterra has maintained its forecast range of $5.90-6.90/kg milksolids for the current season, keeping its advance rate at the midpoint of $6.40/kg MS.

It released its updated forecast on the eve of the latest Global DairyTrade (GDT) auction, which saw average prices fall 1% to US$2955/tonne.

Fonterra chair John Monaghan said the global market was finely balanced with both demand and supply increasing but it has the potential to change.

“There is good demand in the market at this stage of the season, however, the forecast economic slowdown is likely to increase global unemployment and reduce consumer demand,” he said.  . . 

Hunters slam DOC’s tahr plan – Neal Wallace:

If the Department of Conservation (DOC) was hoping to diffuse the tahr culling debate by releasing a new control plan, it has failed.

DOC operations director Dr Ben Reddiex has released an updated Tahr Control Operational Plan for the coming year, which will focus control on public conservation land.

“With an open mind we have considered a wide range of submissions from groups and individuals representing the interests of recreational and commercial tahr hunters, as well as conservationists, recreationists and statutory bodies,” he said in a statement.

Acknowledging the new plan will not satisfy everyone, he says it will enable the recreational and commercial hunting of trophy bulls and other tahr, while still moving DOC towards meeting the statutory goals of the 1993 Himalayan Thar Control Plan. . . 

 

Rural Waikato thrives on community spirit :

In this part of the country, more than 200,000 cows are milked, fed and cared for each day by Kiwis, as well as by a growing group of skilled migrants.

Experienced farm hands are in high demand and, as Waikato farmers increasingly realise and appreciate, some of the best workers come from the Philippines.

Johnrey Emperado, second-in-charge at a 270-hectare farm near Tirau, is one of them.

Johnrey and his wife Iris moved to New Zealand in 2009. With their two children, daughter Skye (4) and baby Brian, who was born in January, they live on Moondance Farms, where Johnrey works. . . 

New AgResearch boss keen to make NZ ag great again – Nigel Malthus:

AgResearch’s new chief executive is promising solid evidence-based science to make New Zealand’s agriculture sector the best in the world.

Nigel Malthus reports.

Dr Sue Bidrose recently took up the role at AgResearch’s Lincoln head office after a varied career, including policy work for the Ministry of Social Development and 15 years in local government, the last seven as chief executive of the Dunedin City Council.

“We are here to do really good science, to give our agricultural community the best ammunition they’ve got to be the best in the world,” Bidrose told Rural News. . .

From Boeing to baling :

A number of out-of-work airline pilots are considering roles as large machinery operators and tractor drivers.

Former pilot Andy Pender says he won’t be surprised if they find they’re happy working in the country and don’t go back to flying.

Pender is a former captain for Virgin Australia (New Zealand) and now the New Zealand Air Line Pilots’ Association (NZALPA) medical and welfare director.

He says the association has been working for several months with the Ministry for Primary Industries and the Rural Contractors’ Association to match pilots with rural jobs. . . 

UK food exporters’ confidence plummets to record low :

Business confidence among food manufacturers and exporters reached a record low this year due to Covid-19 uncertainty, a new report says.

Data by the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) shows that food firms’ confidence plummeted -65.2% in the second quarter of 2020.

The industry has faced a ‘variety of challenges’, from the closure of the hospitality and out-of-home sectors, to rising costs and a fall in exports. . . 


Build vs borrow

09/09/2020

Something to think about as Labour makes its tax announcement today:

What I think is really important to understand is that we cannot simply borrow our way out of a recession, what we need to do is build our way out of it.Judith Collins

There is a place for borrowing but the need to do that makes the need for policies that will build the economy even more important.


23/22

09/09/2020

23/22 – extra point for correctly spelling jandal.

I’d add:

23. Crib

24. Dag

25. ABs

26. Whanau


Nat plan to fight gynaecological cancers

09/09/2020

National has announced a policy to address late diagnosis and poor survival rates for women with gynaecological cancers:

National is pledging $20 million to protect women from gynaecological cancer through greater awareness, improved clinical guidelines, increased testing and greater access to clinical trials, National Party Leader Judith Collins and National’s spokesperson for Rural Communities and Women Barbara Kuriger say.

Every year in New Zealand more than 1000 women are diagnosed with, and over 475 die, from gynaecological cancer.

This investment is alongside National’s commitment to fund an independent Cancer Agency and set up a $200 million fund dedicated to cancer drugs.

“As an ambassador for the New Zealand Gynaecological Cancer Foundation this has special significance to me. Too many women are going untested and undiagnosed at the moment,” Ms Collins says.

“The sad reality is that most New Zealand families will be affected by cancer. Cancer doesn’t discriminate when it chooses its victims and people shouldn’t have reduced access to treatment just because they live in the country.

“The signs and symptoms of gynaecological cancer are difficult to determine so we will be promoting even greater awareness so women can get themselves diagnosed as soon as possible. National will provide a funding boost to awareness campaigns to ensure this happens.

“We will work with health professionals to maintain up-to-date clinical guidelines that give them the resources to identify gynaecological cancer earlier and make the best decisions around diagnosis and referring women for testing.”

This is just the first announcement in our strong plan to provide better health outcomes for rural communities,” Ms Kuriger says.

“Farming is a stressful and sometimes isolating profession. It can be all too easy to neglect your personal health needs when you’re running a farm, so we want to make care easy and accessible.

“The increased awareness and improved clinical guidelines will lead to more women being tested, and we will provide increased funding to ensure every woman in New Zealand who needs a test is given one.

“National is focused on providing better outcomes closer to home for Kiwi families and communities. This funding will save lives and ensure New Zealand women are getting the care they deserve.”

The Q&A on gynaecological cancers says:

How many women are diagnosed with Gynaecological cancer at the moment?
• Currently, around 1,000 women a year are diagnosed with one of the five gynaecological cancers each year in New Zealand.
How many women die from Gynaecological cancer at the moment?
• Currently, around 475 women are lost to gynaecological cancer each year in New Zealand.
How many more tests are needed?
• Because too many women aren’t aware of the symptoms of gynaecological cancer, and so aren’t presenting for tests, we simply don’t know the size of the unmet need. That’s why our first priority is to increase awareness.
• The funding provided will ensure that the additional demand for tests can be met. If more women are getting tested, and diagnosed earlier, then we will consider this policy a success.
Is this enough?
• It’s not about the amount of money, it’s about spending it right. We know that the evidence says that awareness is an issue and so that’s the issue we want to address.
What kind of tests will be funded?
• There are five different kinds of gynaecological cancer and there are various different tests that can be used for diagnosis. For ovarian cancer this includes ultrasound and the CA-125 blood test.
• We don’t want to pre-empt the development of updated clinical guidelines by determining what kinds of tests are needed, or how many more women will be receiving them, but we do want to ensure that every woman has timely access to the tests they need.
How many more women will be tested as a result of this?
• It’s hard to say because the issue is that too many women are going untested and undiagnosed at the moment.
• The important thing is that women are aware of the symptoms of gynaecological cancer, that they are consulting their GPs in a timely manner, and that where appropriate GPs are referring women for testing.
• National will ensure that the money for increased testing is available, as this is ultimately about saving lives.

Full details are here.

My daughter has low grade serous ovarian cancer, a rare form of the disease which is frequently incurable.

She had been to doctors for two years with symptoms before she was diagnosed.

Her story is far too common because too many women don’t know the symptoms, it’s difficult to diagnose and like four of the five different gynaecological cancers and only cervical cancer it can’t be detected by a smear.

This policy will improve awareness, educate health professionals, increase testing and access to clinical trials.

Six New Zealand women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each week and four New Zealand women die of the disease each week.

Unlike breast cancer which has much better survival rates, the prognosis for women with ovarian cancer hasn’t improved in decades.

One reason for that is that women with ovarian cancer are often diagnosed late and are too ill, or don’t survive, to advocate.

That isn’t an argument to reduce funding for breast cancer initiatives. It is a reason to put a much greater effort into raising awareness, testing and improving access to clinical trials, which this policy aims to do so that women with ovarian, and other gynaecological cancers have the much better chance of survival that women with breast cancer do.


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