Word of the day

August 11, 2020

Sehnsucht –  yearning; wistful longing; the inconsolable longing in the human heart for a far, familiar, non-earthly land one can identify as one’s home; the longing or yearning for something unachievable.


Thatcher thinks

August 11, 2020


Rural round-up

August 11, 2020

Dry July puts Marlborough farmers at risk of spring drought – Sophie Trigger:

Marlborough farmers are relying on “significant” spring rain to avoid drought, figures show.

Last month’s weather data from the Marlborough Research Centre showed the region had recorded just 26 per cent of the long term July average, with 16.8mm.

Total rainfall in from January to July had been 220.2mm, or 59 per cent of the long term average. This made 2020 the fifth driest year on record so far, in the 91 years of data available. . . 

Carpet company links with NZ Merino:

Cavalier Bremworth has entered into a partnership with the New Zealand Merino Company to launch long-term forward contracts with its ZQ wool certification grower community.

In a statement, it said the partnership would deliver $5million value direct to New Zealand strong-wool growers over the next three years as Cavalier Bremworth moved away from synthetic products in favour of wool and natural fibres.

“Partnerships like this are so important for New Zealand’s economic recovery, adding value in generating local employment with transparency and gives confidence and reward to the growth of the New Zealand strong wool sector.

“It’s great to see local brands like Cavalier shifting the dial and walking the talk in helping counter climate change and carbon emissions with more regenerative fibres,” NZM chief executive John Brakenridge said. . . 

Muster’ brings in the younger generation – Sally Rae:

Georgia Urquhart had a couple of sleepless nights prior to the Nextgen Muster.

Miss Urquhart (24) was a driving force behind the initiative which aimed to get more young people involved in — and learning about — the merino industry.

Initially, she feared no-one would turn up or there might only be five, so she was thrilled when 68 attended the first day at Benmore Station, near Omarama, and about 40 the second at Simons Hill Station, in the Mackenzie district — “way more” than she expected.

Miss Urquhart grew up on Grays Hills Station in the Mackenzie, which includes a merino stud that she has become increasingly involved with over the last several years. . . 

New Zealand’s lesser known honeys to get a boost in international markets:

New Zealand’s apiculture industry has embarked on a collective story-telling drive to educate ‘conscious foodie’ consumers offshore about its diverse range of native honey varieties.

Apiculture New Zealand has joined forces with New Zealand Story to create a suite of compelling promotional material about lesser known honey varieties.

Karin Kos, Chief Executive of Apiculture New Zealand says although mānuka honey continues to yield strong export prices and has provided a ‘halo effect’ for other New Zealand honeys, the shrinking margins for non-mānuka styles mean producers are now competing in a commoditised market. . . 

Permission granted for new potato protector:

A new herbicide that controls potato weeds, like black nightshade, has been approved for use in New Zealand, subject to conditions.

Boxer Gold contains the active ingredient prosulfocarb, which is new to New Zealand, but already approved in the European Union, Australia, and Japan.

Benefits identified in the application process for this product include reduced resistance in weeds, leading to bigger potato crops, and more product choice for farmers. . . 

AACo rolls out the Wagyu flavour wheel :

THE unique flavour, texture and aroma of Australia’s famous Wagyu beef can now be marketed using a world-first flavour profile.

Developed by The University of Queensland in partnership with the Australian Agricultural Company, the new flavour wheel is designed to provide product descriptors and to differentiate the different Wagyu cuts and marbling grades.

Sensory and flavour expert Dr Heather Smyth said flavour wheels were commonly used by the wine, seafood, coffee, beer and cocoa industries to describe flavour and sensory properties . . 


Emma Mellow for Auckland Central

August 11, 2020

Emma Mellow has been selected as National’s candidate for Auckland Central:

Emma Mellow replaces retiring MP Nikki Kaye who first won the seat from Labour in 2008. Emma leads a team of communications professionals at ANZ Bank as a Senior Manager within their funds management business.

“I’m very excited to be selected as National’s candidate for Auckland Central. I will be hitting the campaign trail hard in the lead up to September 19. I love our community, its vibrancy and diversity and I’m looking forward to getting out and campaigning with our strong National Party team,” Ms Mellow says.

“I will be travelling from Waiheke, to Great Barrier, to Auckland Central itself, aiming to meet as many people as possible and talk about National’s positive plans for New Zealand’s future.

“Auckland Central has had strong National representation for 12 years and I will be fighting hard to make sure it continues to have strong National representation.

“Our community, like the rest of the country, is worried about the future. What our economy will look like, whether they will have a job and how they will support their family.

“They certainly don’t need tax increases adding any more pressure on their household budget. But that is exactly what Labour and the Greens will do, adding a wealth tax on hard-working New Zealanders, going after their income, their house and their KiwiSaver.

“National is focused on supporting Aucklanders and their livelihoods, from backing those who have lost their jobs and are looking to start up their own business, to backing existing businesses to take on another employee.

“Only National has the economic experience, the competence and the vision to rescue the economy, save businesses and protect jobs,” Ms Mellow says.

Biographical Notes: Emma Mellow

Emma Mellow is 30 years old and works in the Auckland CBD. She leads a team of communications professionals at ANZ Bank as a Senior Manager within their funds management business.

Emma has nine years of commercial experience with a career spanning Australia and New Zealand. She returned to New Zealand in 2017 having previously held communications roles at Sydney Airport, for a Minister in the NSW Government and within public relations consultancy firms.

Emma holds Bachelor of Arts from The University of Auckland and is soon graduating from the university with a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Administration.

Emma grew up in One Tree Hill and attended St Cuthbert’s College. Emma is a qualified volunteer surf life saver and in her spare time enjoys running, ocean swimming and cooking.

David Farrar describes Emma as a young Nikki Kaye.

Nikki was the first National MP in the electorate. She earned the seat with hard work and kept it by working hard, and effectively, for the electorate and its people.

Emma will work just as hard to win the seat and, if she is successful, will continue to work at least as hard and effectively ina nd for the electorate and parliament.


No indexation = tax increase

August 11, 2020

Labour’s wrong on tax – again:

The New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union is slamming the claim by Labour Party finance spokesman Grant Robertson that the National Party’s policy to index tax brackets to inflation is a “tax cut”.

Taxpayers’ Union Executive Director Jordan Williams says, “It’s dishonest to frame indexation – adjusting income tax thresholds to inflation – as a ‘tax cut’, like Mr Robertson did today.”

“Adjusting tax brackets so that people are not artificially pushed into paying higher marginal tax rates isn’t cutting tax. By definition, it’s keeping the rate of tax paid the same.”

“Mr Robertson is trying to cloud the issue so he’s not held to account for the dishonest way he, and successive Ministers of Finance, have increased tax by stealth through wage inflation. It’s a shame he is choosing to be so misleading about tax at a time many households are facing fiscal crisis.”

Adjusting tax thresholds to account for inflation is not a tax cut but failing to do so pushes people into a higher bracket  and subjects them to paying more which is in effect a tax increase.

Given Labour’s big spending plan with borrowed money is not matched by plans to reduce spending anywhere, encourage growth nor to repay the debt it will almost certainly increase some taxes.

Even if it does nothing more, by refusing to index brackets to inflation it will be increasing tax for everyone who is pushed into a higher threshold.


%d bloggers like this: