Word of the day

August 10, 2020

Hodophile –  a lover of roads or travel; one who loves to travel.


Sowell says

August 10, 2020


Rural round-up

August 10, 2020

No long term business without animal welfare: farmers – Bonnie Flaws:

Farm or Harm: In this series we look at the rules, expectations and attitudes guiding the New Zealand primary sector’s treatment of animals.

Animal welfare should be the priority if farmers want to build a successful business, say a leading dairy farming couple.

A number of cases of mistreatment of animals have put the spotlight of some farmers and industry practices.

But for award-winning Taranaki sharemilkers Simon and Natasha Wilkes animal welfare simply makes good business sense. . . 

From pasture to pastoral care – Mary-Jo Tohill:

If you’d asked South Otago pastor Alex McLaughlin back in his Canterbury farming days if he was interested in becoming a minister, he’d have said, “Never, it’s just not me.”

The religious conviction was always there; he started running Sunday school at the age of 17 but never envisaged it becoming a fulltime role. Yet, now 62, here he is.

“Being a pastor in a rural community requires being able to roll with whatever comes your way and there is no real way to prepare for the wide variety of tasks that are expected of you.”

He is also pastor at Silver Fern Farms’ Finegand plant and the Southern Institute of Technology’s Telford campus near Balclutha.  . . 

No working dogs but lots of kiwi on Okaihau dairy farm – Kate Guthrie:

Jane and Roger Hutchings haven’t had a dog on Lodore Farm, their 450-hectare Northland property, in over 20 years – but they do have a lot of North Island brown kiwi.

“We estimate we have at least 50 pairs of North Island Brown kiwi,” Jane says. “We do the kiwi call census every year in two different areas of the farm. I’ve sat in the same spot for the last 8 years and Roger has another area he has counted in the last few years.”

This gives the Hutchings an idea of how many birds they have in certain areas. Calls identify male or female birds, a compass bearing and distance apart. The good news is counts are going up meaning young birds are surviving.

Jane’s call-count spot is a mixture of pasture and regenerating bush while Roger counts kiwi calls from an area of mature bush. . . 

Southland cleared of M.bovis cattle disease – Louisa Steyl:

It was considered the origin of New Zealand’s Mycoplasma bovis outbreak in 2017, but today, Southland is infection free.

Ministry of Primary Industries regional recovery manager Richard McPhail praised the farming community for their co-operation as he shared the news on Friday that there are no longer any active properties, or properties under a Notice of Direction, in Southland.

“There’s been a lot of heavy lifting done to get to this point,” he said.

But there was still work to be done, McPhail said. “There’s an expectation that more infection will be found, [albeit] not necessarily in our area.” . .

Arable farmers pleased with 2020 harvest yields:

Final harvest data for wheat, barley and oats (milling/malting and feed) in 2020 show yields were up 17% overall across the six crops.

The July AIMI (Arable Industry Marketing Initiative) Survey report shows these results were from a reduced number of hectares planted (down 6%), with the net result being a 10% increase in total tonnage compared to last season.

“For context, keep in mind when making the comparison that 2019’s results were below average,” Federated Farmers Vice-Chairperson Grains, Brian Leadley, said.

“Nevertheless, we have those reported strong yields and even a new world record.  While the 17.398 tonnes/hectare of Kerrin wheat harvested on Eric Watson’s Ashburton farm is testament to great management, it’s also a reflection of a pretty good growing season.” . . 

Spat hatchery business in the wings for eastern Bay of Plenty:

Te Whānau-ā-Apanui and Aotearoa Mussel Limited have joined forces to build a land-based mussel spat hatchery in the Eastern Bay of Plenty, to enhance New Zealand’s growing aquaculture industry.

Te Whānau-ā-Apanui will invest $1.2million in a research and development programme with support from Callaghan Innovation. The programme is scheduled to commence in early September 2020.

Rikirangi Gage, CEO of Te Rūnanga o Te Whānau has assumed a sponsorship role in the project. He said that “the hatchery concept is a perfect fit with a burgeoning mussel industry in New Zealand, particularly within the Eastern Bay of Plenty”. . . 


Hands up for Rangitata

August 10, 2020

Megan Hands has been selected as National’s candidate for Rangitata.

National’s new Rangitata candidate would like to see more mothers in Parliament and thinks her ‘’strong background’’ in rural and environmental management will help in her campaign for the seat. . . 

Hands has spent her professional career in agricultural and resource management consultancy working with farmers, growers and small business.

“With a strong primary sector base, Rangitata is well-placed to help lead a post-Covid economic recovery.

“The people of Rangitata are extremely hard-working and right now they are worried about the future, whether they will have a job and how they will support their family.’’ . . 

Megan has a strong party background as an active Young Nat and member of the Blue Greens. She has also been active in Young Farmers, including twice reaching the regional finals of the Young Farmer of the Year contest.

Her experience working with farmers to improve environmental performance will be invaluable.

She will bring strong science-based, practical environment credentials to the caucus and will be a strong advocate for her electorate.

Her name will be a gift for campaigning – Hands up, helping Hands . . .


Voters bank bribes

August 10, 2020

A  Q+A Colmar Brunton Poll of the Northland electorate shows there is little very little chance of New Zealand First staying in parliament:

According to the Q+A Colmar Brunton Poll results, Matt King had 46% support, Willow-Jean Prime was on 31% and Shane Jones on just 15%.

Jones winning Northland has been touted as NZ First’s safety net should the party not make it past the 5% threshold needed to stay in parliament.

This poll shows Jones in an unwinnable position and recent nationwide polls put NZ First well short of 5%.

The party has been campaigning for the seat for nearly three years, throwing a high proportion of the grants from the Provincial Growth Fund at projects in the electorate, whether or not the spending was justified.

Northland voters are more intelligent than NZ First thinks they are. They’re happy to accept the money thrown at them but they’re not being bought.

That’s not unusual.

Voters don’t usually reward parties for bribes, they bank them and mov eon to the next project.

 


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