Word of the day

August 4, 2020

Bovarism –  a conception of oneself as other than one is to the extent that one’s general behavior is conditioned or dominated by the conception;  an exaggerated, especially glamorised, estimate of oneself; conceit;  domination by such an idealized, glamorised, glorified, or otherwise unreal conception of oneself that it results in dramatic personal conflict, markedly unusual behavior or great achievement


Sowell says

August 4, 2020


Rural round-up

August 4, 2020

Hyperbole flies over high country – David Williams:

The Government’s big shake-up of the high country has upset farmers and green groups. David Williams drills into the detail

Across Lake Wakatipu from Queenstown, at the sprawling Mt Nicholas Station, Kate Cocks and her family seem sheltered from the ill winds of Covid-19. 

Yes, the catamaran that used to bring tourists over for farm tours isn’t running, and the public road running through the almost 40,000-hectare station isn’t packed with tourists riding the Around the Mountains cycle trail. 

But Mt Nicholas still has certainty. It has long-lasting contracts with US-owned clothing company Icebreaker and Italian textiles company Reda for the wool from its 29,000 merino sheep, and also runs 2300 Hereford cattle.  . . 

Crossbred farmers feel financial pinch – Yvonne O’Hara:

Southern Rural Life reporter Yvonne O’Hara  looks at  issues affecting the shearing sector, particularly training and crossbred wool returns.

Robbing Peter to pay Paul does not make financial sense when shearing crossbred sheep.

Although the issue was not common at present, some crossbred farmers might be looking at cutting costs and asking their contractors to limit the supply of woolhandlers to their sheds, New Zealand Shearing Contractors Association president Mark Barrowcliffe said

More were likely to be considering that if the price they received for their wool did not improve and shearing, transport and associated costs were not recovered. . .

Tackling farming boots and all – Gerard Hutching:

A former international rugby player who once played for the All Blacks, decided to end his stellar career and hang his boots to return to his farming roots. Gerard Hutching reports.

For George Whitelock a decade-long professional rugby career had a myriad benefits: a secure income, world travel, paths to leadership and friendships forged with a cross-section of Kiwi society. 

But in terms of dairy farming, the pay-off has related to the way in which performance was measured on and off the sports field, and how that has translated into his new business.  

“What drives you when you’re a sportsman is that when you play every week, with technology you get all the improvements from watching video clips and varying your performance,” George said. 

“With farming I get great satisfaction every day knowing what’s going out the gate and I can judge myself and ask ‘what did I do well today or not so well’ – it’s so measurable. That challenge drives me, and it’s why I’m so passionate about dairying.”1 . . 

From koru to cows – Annette Scott:

Nikayla Knight’s career path has gone from the glamour of serving lattes in an airport lounge to milking cows on a Mid Canterbury dairy farm and she is stoked.

Knight was pursuing a hospitality career in the Koru Lounge at Dunedin airport when covid-19 struck. She effectively lost her job overnight.

“Given tourism shut down because of covid I was out of work. I wasn’t going to sit around and do nothing.

“I had three months out of work, no money coming in, no hope of returning to my job so I was looking for anything,” Knight said. . . 

UN removes anti-meat tweet:

The United Nations has removed a tweet following a global backlash from farmers.

The tweet, posted on July 26, stated “The meat industry is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than the world’s biggest oil companies. Meat production contributes to the depletion of water resources & drives deforestation.”

The tweet was accused of being sympathetic to oil companies, whilst targeting the meat industry.

According to Australian website Farm Online, the Australian government felt particularly targeted by the tweet. . .

Agrichemical industry will take responsibility for environmental waste :

Agrichemical manufacturers back the government’s mandate to take environmental responsibility for their products at the end of their useful life.

Agcarm members support the government’s moves to place the onus on them to ensure that their products can be recycled or disposed of safely. The association’s chief executive Mark Ross says “our members have a long history of taking responsibility for their products. They do this by paying a levy on all products sold, so that they can be recycled or sustainably treated at the end of their useful life”.

The industry funds the rural recycling programme Agrecovery which offers farmers alternatives to the harmful disposal practices of burning, burying and stockpiling of waste. Agcarm is a founder and trustee of the programme, “demonstrating a long-standing commitment to better environmental outcomes,” says Ross. . .


Poverty of delivery BC & vision AC

August 4, 2020

Before Covid-19 (BC) the government was much better at media releases about their policies than delivering them.

Labour’s flagship policy KiwiBuild was a flop, child poverty worsened and the country was facing rising numbers on jobseeker benefits and forecast deficits even before Covid-19 struck.

While we can debate the when and how of the government’s response to the pandemic, we can be very grateful that there is no evidence of community transmission and, in spite of early mismanagement, new cases are being contained at the border.

While everything possible must be done to ensure that continues, now is the time to be formulating a plan for after Covid (AC).

The Labour leader’s warning not to expect big policies from her party this election is a mistake.

We need big policies. That doesn’t mean big-spending policies, it means big visionary ones and among them must be a strategy to repay the debt it is amassing:

With the election only weeks away, Labour needs to clearly explain to voters how it intends to repay the massive debt it is taking on to deal with Covid-19 – and whether its plan will involve higher taxes, National’s Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

“Optimism is not a strategy for economic recovery,” Mr Goldsmith says. “So what is Labour’s target and timeframe for getting this country’s debt under control?

“Labour’s silence on the issue of a debt target is a telling sign that the only tricks up Grant Robertson sleeve is to keep spending and, eventually, reveal that he will have to hike taxes.

“Any responsible government will set a long-term target to get the huge amount of debt we are taking on under control so that the country can respond to the next crisis.

“We have said we will aim to get debt below 30 per cent of GDP in a decade or so.

“New Zealand can achieve this by striving for higher economic growth, by increasing government spending at a slightly slower rate than currently projected, and by halting contributions to the Super Fund.

“Rather than outlining any credible plan of her own this morning, Ms Ardern made false claims about the prospect of austerity under National. This is complete nonsense, and she knows it.

“National agrees with the Government that it is absolutely appropriate to spend more and borrow more during an economic crisis, such as we are seeing today.

“This is not the time for austerity, and nobody is suggesting it.”

Any government can borrow and spend. It takes a capable and disciplined one to spend the borrowed money wisely, make savings where necessary and plan to pay off debt to enable the country to cope with the next crisis.

The last National government inherited forecasts for a decade of deficits. It managed to get back into surplus while protecting the vulnerable from the worst effects of the Global Financial Crisis and dealing with the Canterbury earthquakes.

The current government inherited forecasts of surpluses, burned through them before Covid struck and is now planning to borrow big with no ideas about how to repay the debt.

This government had poverty of delivery BC and now Labour has poverty of vision AC. Parties that couldn’t deliver in relative good times can’t be trusted to deliver in bad times.


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