How are going to get out of this mess?

Sir Bill English is warning businesses to prepare for a W-shaped downturn:

Former prime minister Sir Bill English has issued a bleak warning to businesses to prepare for the worst case scenario as “cracks” created by the economic earthquake of Covid-19 become more apparent.

Just like the damage caused to Wellington’s buildings by the Kaikoura earthquake, the true damage to the economy might not emerge immediately, he said.

Wage subsidies had “bought time for thousands of businesses” and there was a sense just from the amount of traffic on the streets of there being a “bounce”, he said.

But the return in consumer confidence would not last and businesses are “reluctant to deal with the fact” that the economy might drop back again, he told a webinar hosted by accounting firm BDO. . . 

Businesses might find by the middle of next year that they had 20 per cent less revenue as a “W”-shaped downturn took shape, and needed to ask if they could survive on that, English said.

“This is going to be marathon not a sprint. It could be really tough.” . . 

Job losses are already piling up:

Today’s troubling revelation that another 1500 Kiwis lost their jobs this week highlights the need for a sound economic plan to get us through the current jobs crisis, National’s Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

The number of people receiving unemployment benefits is now up to 212,000 – an increase of 67,000 since New Zealand went into lockdown.

This week alone, 1500 more people went on the dole. Another 450,000 Kiwis are also in the precarious position of relying on the wage subsidy scheme that will run out on September 1.

“New Zealand is facing its worst economic downturn in 160 years,” Mr Goldsmith says.

“This incompetent Government’s big idea is simply to increase government spending, which will just lump the country with more debt for future generations to repay through higher taxes. . . 

The government’s response so far is not going to help the economy:

Massive debt-fuelled spending and keeping the border tight are necessary but insufficient to restore our economy and create jobs, National’s Finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

Mr Goldsmith was reacting to Grant Robertson’s “Q & A” interview this morning, where the Minister played down projected job-losses when the wage subsidy ends and emphasised more government spending and tight border as the government’s primary economic response.

“The reality is that the spending has not always been well targeted or effective and the so-called tight border of Labour has been shown to have holes.

“The missing piece in the job creation story – the third trick – is bold moves to enable private sector investment,” Mr Goldsmith says.

“The government can buy temporary jobs, such as it is with its $1.1 billion programme to hunt possums and plant flax bushes, but it is the free enterprise economy that creates the most sustainable jobs.

“We need to be making it easier for firms to hire workers and expand their business.

“As well as its JobStart and BusinessStart programmes, which help businesses hire additional workers and redundant workers start a business, National has announced substantial tax changes to encourage businesses to invest. Firms will be able to write off $150,000 per new asset immediately.

“National would also extend 90 day trials to all firms – making it easier for companies to take a chance on new employees, and reverse recent further restrictions on inward investment.

“The government, meantime, is still in the mind-set of adding costs and regulations to business, such as last week’s higher waste levy charges,” Mr Goldsmith says.

Debt will increase whichever parties are in government after next month’s election.

A responsible one needs a plan to minimise  the borrowing and to pay it back.

Without that, Damien Grant says, the Government’s Covid-19 spending will be an economic albatross for decades:

 The true extent of the intergenerational crime that is being committed is becoming clear.

Today’s young are being robbed of opportunities and may be the first generation in our nation’s history to be significantly poorer than their parents.

Let’s start with the easy part: government debt. We spent $12 billion on the wage subsidy, the vast majority going to boomer-owned businesses to ensure they did not have to pay the full cost of their firms being shuttered.

Think about this for a moment. Almost every firm that got the money would have survived. This was a freebie to the capital-owning class; paid for with borrowed money that will not be re-paid by them, as their tax-paying days are coming to a close in the next decade. . . 

Whether or not most firms would have survived is debatable, as is the question of whether they were in trouble before the lockdown.

Wellington has decided, with overwhelming community support, to smash our economy in order to temporarily eliminate what has proved to be a virus with a far lower level of mortality than first advertised.

Fine. This isn’t something that I support, but OK. Let’s do this. However, if you are going to destroy tourism, damage hospitality and cripple construction, we need to be honest with ourselves; we are going to have to get by with less.

But we don’t want to do that. There is a collective refusal to accept that we are considerably poorer today than we were in January. There is an illusion of economic normality being created by enough ink to re-hydrate the Red Sea. . . 

National Party finance spokesman and putative post-election leader Paul Goldsmith estimates the projected $140b of future borrowings is equal to $80,000 per household.

Yet, no one seems to care. We’re in a panic over the fairness of charging people $3000 to cover the costs of an enforced stay in a quarantine hotel and the antics of school kids playing at being Nazis, but were heading off the edge of a fiscal cliff and … nothing.

The cost of borrowing will be paid for in two ways. Not only will this money need to be paid back; either through higher taxes, reduced government services or by the pernicious and economically destructive hidden tax of inflation, there is the opportunity cost of lost growth.

When you borrow to maintain consumption you are stripping resources from the economy that could have been deployed elsewhere for more productive activity; investment, primarily.

People wanting to borrow find they cannot get access to capital because the state is sucking up all available cash.

It isn’t just the cash available for lending either. It is the physical and human resources that entrepreneurs require to trade that are being diverted by the states’ uncontrolled spending. . . 

This government thinks it’s better at spending our money than we are and it’s spending is making it more difficult for private enterprise to flourish.

The lockdown produced a very good health response but the government response to the economic crisis will make it worse.

The problem isn’t just that sooner or later the debt will have to be repaid. It’s that every cent needed to repay it is a cent not available for essential services and infrastructure unless the economy starts growing, and growing well, again and there is no sign of anything from the government that will help us get out of this mess.

2 Responses to How are going to get out of this mess?

  1. adamsmith1922 says:

    Reblogged this on The Inquiring Mind.

  2. Roj Blake says:

    The “problem” is that Goldsmith et al are locked into antiquated thinking. NZ is no longer tied to the gold standard, its currency is no longer pegged to the value of any other currency, and government debt is not evil.

    When the government borrows from the community by issuing bonds, then the community level of saving increases. Interest paid on those bonds is income going into the community, that can either be used to buy stuff, or retained as further savings for the future.

    But the big misapprehension is that the government needs to borrow at all. It doesn’t. As the sole issuer of $NZ, the government can create all the money it needs, as long as it maintains inflation within reasonable bounds.

    When the government does this it will show as a deficit in the government’s accounts, but that deficit is offset by a surplus in the economy. If the government runs a surplus in its accounts, then that must be matched by a deficit in the economy.

    The government must act to ensure that the economy runs at full speed and to do that, it must ensure that there is work for everyone who needs/wants it. An economy with less than full employment is an inefficient economy.

    If you are concerned that the government will be supporting failing businesses, then rather than arguing for a reduction of government money into the economy, argue for the assistance to be in the form of loans with delayed repayments, secured over the assets of the business like any other loan.

    These new times require a new way of managing. It is time to stop listening to economists and listen to accountants. Too many economists still think a $ spent bu the government is a wasted dollar; an accountant can tell you that every $ spent by the government has to go somewhere and that somewhere is into the economy.

    This government thinks it’s better at spending our money than we are and it’s spending is making it more difficult for private enterprise to flourish.

    At the risk of repeating myself, the government does not need your money to fund its spending. It can raise and lower taxes to manage the speed of the economy, to remove money when it overheats, and to add money when it cools.

    The government can fund all its spending with a few simple strokes on a keyboard in Wellington.

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