Word of the day

28/07/2020

Dingle – a deep wooded valley or dell; a deep hollow, usually shaded with trees; a deep, narrow cleft between hills; shady dell.


Sowell says

28/07/2020


Rural round-up

28/07/2020

Synthetics out in favour of natural fibres – Sally Rae:

Carpet-maker Cavalier is ditching synthetics in favour of wool and other natural fibres, citing “negative impacts on people’s health and the planet”.

The listed company yesterday unveiled a new transformational strategy, saying it would transition away from the manufacture and supply of synthetic fibre carpets over the next 12 months and existing synthetic stocks would be sold down.

In its strategy, the company said the long-term dangers posed by plastics were becoming clear. Plastic was a global problem and manufacturers needed to be part of the solution.

The impact that plastics had on human health was not yet fully understood, but early studies suggested that microplastics entering the body were a potential threat. The average Kiwi home with synthetic carpet was similar to having 22,000 plastic bags on the floor, by weight, it said. . . 

From lipstick to gum boots :

City girl becomes ‘Gumboot Girl’ and helps introduce sustainable practices on Northland dairy farm.

For years Jo Wood worked as a beauty therapist in Auckland. She was, in her words, “a city slicker”.

But then she “fell into” another job, one about as far removed from the glamour of make-up, manicures and pedicures as it’s possible to get.

Working in gumboots and a singlet, these days she walks the pastures of a 350ha dairy farm located on the coast between the Northland towns of Wellsford and Warkworth – and is known to one and all by her alter ego ‘Gumboot Girl‘. . .

 

Wools NZ elects new chairman – Annette Scott:

Former Beef and Lamb New Zealand chairman James Parson has been elected chairman of Wools NZ to lead the organisation in a new direction post covid-19.

The recognised industry leader, well known for his past chairmanship of Beef and Lamb NZ and the NZ Meat Board, Parsons was initially elected to the board by growers at the organisation’s annual meeting in November.    

The grower-owned strong wool marketing and export company has now embarked on a new era post covid-19 to re-orientate its strategic direction.

Parsons, a Northland sheep and beef farmer believes he well understands the industry challenges from a grassroots perspective. . . 

What’s next for the wool industry? – Annette Scott:

Step one of the wool industry’s Vision and Action report has connected the stakeholders now Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor says the next step must lead to real purpose.

“It’s absolutely crucial the next step is real purpose, this report will most certainly not be sitting gathering dust,” O’Connor said.

“The project action group (PAG) has rounded up the situation, connected with industry players and provided some real guidance for the next step.

“With the absence of major initiatives from the industry I have to be responsible to put something up.”  . . 

Alliance to spend $3.2m on upgrade :

Alliance Group is to spend $3.2million on a further upgrade at its Lorneville plant, near Invercargill, to help improve operational efficiency.

The plant’s engine room two, which provides key refrigeration for four cold stores, some blast freezers and several product chillers will receive upgraded safety features, equipment and building structure.

The programme would improve the company’s ability to control the refrigeration system remotely and provide a platform for further investment, Alliance said in a statement.

It would also give an opportunity to have more control points and sensors, improve the ability to provide automation control and result in ‘‘significant’’ savings through energy efficiency. . . 

Welsh unions highlight farmers’ role in fighting climate change :

Wales’ two farming unions have highlighted the vital role of agriculture in helping the UK to address the threat of climate change.

NFU Cymru and the Farmers’ Union of Wales held a virtual meeting with the UK’s High-Level Climate Action Champion, Nigel Topping, who was appointed by the prime minister in January.

In addition to wider discussions around climate change, the roundtable event provided a platform to discuss the ‘Race to Zero’ campaign.

The international campaign aims to strive for a healthy, resilient zero carbon recovery, which was launched on World Environment Day and will run up to COP26 . . .


Don’t have to be doomed

28/07/2020

National finance spokesman Paul Goldsmith’s speech to IFINZ includes this gem:

To me, the point of a strong economy is to enable New Zealanders to do the most basic things in life well.

A strong economy improves our chances of finding satisfying and well-paying work so that we can look after ourselves and our families – the most fundamental task each of us have.

A society based on the assumption that its average citizen can’t or shouldn’t be expected to look after themselves and their families is doomed.  

This government’s all-rights-no-responsibility attitude to benefits has sent a strong message that people aren’t expected to look after themselves.

People looking back at the supposed good old days often cite the level of government support, including universal Family Benefit.

They conveniently overlook the fact that most families had two parents, generally one of those parents was in paid work and most people expected to look after themselves and their families.

The economic impact of Covid-19 has resulted in a significant number of job losses. Few would argue that they should not have the safety net of a benefit.

The only way to ensure that net doesn’t become a trap is a strong economy that gives businesses the confidence to invest and employ people.

The government has been quite clear about its willingness to borrow and spend. It hasn’t provided a plan for economic growth.

National does have a plan:

Government spending, however, cannot provide the full plan. The money has to come from somewhere – it either comes from current taxpayers, leaving them with less to make their own investments, or from future generations – leaving them with less to make their own investments.

The primary driver for growth and jobs needs to be the private sector. 

The recipe for this hasn’t changed.

It requires disciplined Government creating an environment where businesses feel confident to invest and a mix of employment-friendly policies that make it easier to take on new people.

The core elements are:

  • Low taxes
  • Regulatory restraint
  • Consistency
  • An openness to investment
  • And in the Covid recovery context we can add, a path to make progress on the border. . . 

We don’t have to be doomed.

The recipe to save us from that is simple, as is the expectation that those of us who can look after ourselves and our families should do so.


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