How hard is it?

Two people are being charged with breaching isolation requirements.

The first is a woman who climbed a fence to escape.

.. . . Police said the 43-year-old will appear in the Auckland District Court once she has completed her managed isolation obligations.

She faces a charge of a breach of the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act.

The woman arrived from Brisbane on 27 June and returned a negative Covid-19 test three days later. . . 

She had passed a Covid-19 test, the second case is more serious, he has tested positive:

The country’s latest case of Covid-19 will be charged for visiting an Auckland supermarket last night, Health Minister Chris Hipkins has confirmed.

Hipkins said the 32-year-old man, who arrived from India on July 3, left his managed isolation last night to go to the Countdown supermarket on Victoria Street in central Auckland.

The man was outside the facility for 70 minutes.

Hipkins said after CCTV footage was viewed and the man was interviewed, the current assessment of the risk to the public was low.

“The person wore a mask although indicated that was removed for short periods of time.”

The Countdown remained closed today in order to be cleaned thoroughly. . . 

Who pays for the day’s closure and cleaning?

Air Commodore Darryn Webb, head of Managed Isolation and Quarantine, said the smoking policy – as well as the security policy – will be looked at.

He said there was a robust system in place “however, as we’ve seen, we can always do better”.

Webb said there was a guard outside Stamford Plaza when the man left.

The security guard watched the man leave but wasn’t sure if the man leaving was a contractor, Webb said.

“They don’t have the powers of police to apprehend … clearly it’s about communicating … if it’s logical that they take chase then that’s what they do. . . 

Shouldn’t a guard who was unsure about someone leaving at least have question have questioned him to find out whether or not he was a contractor?

If the government can pass a law that allows police to enter any home without a warrant can’t it pass a law to allow security guards to stop apprehend people who abscond from MIQ?

The absence of community transmission has left the government with just one job – keeping Covid-19 at the border.

To keep it in perspective there’s only been two cases – at least two that we know of, but  every breach not only risks the spread of disease it increases the time before the border opens any further.

How hard is it with all the resources being thrown at MIQ to ensure people do what they are required to do?

If it’s too hard they need to look at their systems and processes.

People in MIQ in Australia are locked in their rooms. That is a very draconian measure when most people are doing what’s required and if the government can’t find a way to allow people some fresh air and exercise, and to smoke, without the risk of them absconding, it’s time for a government that can.

One Response to How hard is it?

  1. adamsmith1922 says:

    Reblogged this on The Inquiring Mind and commented:
    Chaotic

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: