Word of the day

12/06/2020

Wrongthink – beliefs or opinions that run contrary to the prevailing orthodoxy; any word or phrase that detests or goes against the current mainstream leftist narrative.


Sowell says

12/06/2020


Rural round-up

12/06/2020

Experts call for review of regenerative farming ‘mythology’ –  Sally Rae;

Two prominent plant science academics have called for the establishment of an expert panel of scientists to review claims made about regenerative agriculture.

In a letter to Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, Dr Derrick Moot, a professor of plant science at Lincoln University, and retired senior lecturer Dr Warwick Scott said they were concerned about the “mythology” of regenerative agriculture “and its worrying increased profile in the New Zealand media and farming sectors”.

New Zealand sheep and beef farmers had world-leading agricultural practices and the underpinning scientific principles of the country’s current agricultural systems were in danger of being devalued by a system they believed had several serious shortcomings, they said.

They were particularly concerned the “erroneous publicity” about regenerative agriculture would divert the limited New Zealand agricultural science resources from more important, substantive issues.

To define regenerative agriculture was difficult, the pair said. . . 

Dairy industry needs skilled, willing workers, wherever they’re from – Esther Taunton:

“New Zealand’s dairy industry has a shortage of skilled and willing workers.”

It’s a simple sentence so why does such a large chunk of the non-dairy farming population seem to have a problem understanding the key words – “skilled” and “willing”?

When Stuff ran the story of two South Island farmers desperately trying to get their skilled migrant workers back across our closed borders before the start of calving, it took just minutes for the keyboard warriors to roll out the same tired accusations and arguments.

“Serves them right for choosing migrants over Kiwis!” they cried.

But they didn’t. Not without trying to find Kiwi workers first, anyway. Because even if they didn’t want to employ New Zealanders, farmers have a legal obligation to advertise for local staff before they’re able to start recruiting offshore. . . 

Strong 2019/20 financial result for Zespri helps support regional New Zealand:

2019/20 Financial Results Summary:
• Total Operating revenue: NZ$3.36 billion
• Total fruit sales revenue: NZ$3.14 billion
• Total New Zealand-grown fruit and service payments: $1.96 billion
• New Zealand and Non-New Zealand trays sold: 164.4 million trays
• Zespri’s net profit after tax NZ$200.8 million
• Expected Total Dividends: NZ$0.94

Almost NZ$2 billion was returned to New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry following Zespri’s 2019/20 season, helping support thousands of businesses, workers and regional communities around the country.

Zespri’s 2019/20 Financial Results show total fruit and service payments, which are returns direct to the New Zealand industry, increased by 8 percent year on year to NZ$1.96 billion. . . 

Meating’ the need:

While COVID-19 lockdown rules have now been eased, many New Zealand foodbanks remain under huge pressure as breadwinners lose their jobs and savings run dry.

To help keep up with this demand and to provide something a bit different from the regular food box items, a charity set up by farmers is connecting donated produce from farmers with processors and foodbanks.

‘Meat The Need’ was founded by South Island farmers Wayne Langford and Siobhan O’Malley. Since it started in mid-April, meat from more than 200 animals, including cattle, sheep and deer, has been donated to food banks around the South Island, enough for a staggering 90,000 meals for vulnerable families! . . 

Expos aimed at creating win-win – Tracey Roxburgh:

A Southern Institute of Technology (SIT) initiative is hoping to create a win-win from the Covid-19 economic crisis.

The SIT is holding two Agricultural Redeployment Expos, one each in Queenstown and Te Anau, this week, hoping to attract people who may have lost jobs in the tourism and hospitality sector to retrain in the agricultural sector, which is facing a shortage of about 150 skilled machinery operators this year.

Annually, the agriculture sector has sought fill those roles with workers from the United Kingdom and Ireland, in particular, but given border closures this year due to the global pandemic, that will not be possible. . . 

Native plants sequester carbon for longer – Marc Daalder:

A new study indicates native plants, despite their tendency to grow more slowly than exotic species like Pinus Radiata, are better at storing carbon in the soil for longer periods of time, Marc Daalder reports

Exotic plant species release 150 percent more carbon dioxide from the soil than native New Zealand plants, according to a new study from the Bio-Protection Research Centre published in Science.

The research is the latest development in an extended scientific debate over whether to prioritise planting native or exotic species to increase biodiversity and fight climate change.

While it doesn’t upset the longstanding scientific consensus that faster-growing plants sequester more carbon – and that exotic species planted outside their usual range will grow faster – the study does complicate the picture of the carbon cycle. . . 

Time for EU to commit to level playing field for trade:

The Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand (DCANZ) has welcomed New Zealand Trade Minister David Parker’s statement that it is unacceptable for New Zealand exporters to continue facing an ‘unlevel playing field’ in the EU.

Details leaked ahead of the 8th round of EU-NZ FTA negotiations have revealed the EU is seeking to maintain an extreme level of market access restriction against New Zealand dairy exports. The leaked EU market access offer comes despite both parties having committed to ‘work towards a deep, comprehensive, and high-quality Free Trade Agreement’.

DCANZ Chairman, Malcolm Bailey, says the reported EU offer, comprised of miniscule quota volumes and high in-quota tariffs, could never credibly form part of a free trade agreement between the economies. . . 


Paying for propaganda

12/06/2020

The Taxpayers’ Union has filed a complaint  over unite for recovery advertisements:

The New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union has laid a formal complaint with the Auditor General regarding today’s full-page advertisements placed in a number of newspapers, including The New Zealand Herald and the Dominion Post, by the New Zealand Government.

Taxpayers’ Union spokesperson Jordan Williams says, “These advertisements are not primarily informative or educational, unlike earlier Government COVID-19 advertisements. Today’s ads have moved into the realm of thinly veiled political propaganda at the taxpayers’ expense.”

“‘Unite for the recovery’ is widely expected to be the central theme of the Labour Party’s 2020 election campaign. Only 102 days from an election, the public service should be vigilant to political masters using taxpayer-funded resources to support political messages.”

“Full page newspaper adverts of a political nature, even in this depressed media environment, are expensive. With Government debt going through the roof, borrowed funds should be used on vital services, not propaganda.”

I’m over the lectures, being talked at as if I’m a child,  and am now at the point where I see the yellow branding for Covid-19 and pass over whatever it says.

Whether or not these advertisements are political propaganda, they’re a waste of public money.

When the government is incurring such an eye-watering amount of debt it should be scrutinising every cent it spends and not wasting it on propaganda.


NZ hit harder than most

12/06/2020

The government boasts of going hard against Covid-19, will it also boast that as a result of that the economy has been hit harder than most?

New figures show New Zealand is likely to experience a bigger economic shock from Covid-19 than Australia and other OECD countries despite being in a better position than most to manage the crisis, National’s Finance Spokesperson Paul Goldsmith says.

“The OECD estimates that New Zealand’s GDP will fall by 8.9 per cent this year, worse than the OECD average of 7.5 per cent.

“New Zealand had huge advantages in terms of isolation, distance and small population, yet our extremely heavy lockdown has resulted in a worse economic outcome than most.

The government’s insistence on allowing only those businesses it deemed essential which was both arbitrary and inconsistent, means we’re paying a far higher cost than it it had allowed those that could operate safely to do so.

“Finance Minister Grant Robertson has spent the last 18 months telling us that New Zealand is doing so much better relative to the OECD, yet we’re now lagging behind at the first test.

“Two thirds of OECD countries expected to fare better economically than New Zealand. Australia and South Korea are only expected to contract by 5 per cent and 1.2 per cent this year respectively.

“Australia, for example, managed to keep industries like construction operating throughout the lockdown and as a result they will have a smaller economic impact and lower unemployment.

“New Zealand’s unemployment rate is expected to rise by 3.8 per compared to just 2.2 per cent in Australia. This highlights that while New Zealand has managed the health response to Covid-19 successfully, the economic response has been poor.

“The Government urgently needs to put forward comprehensive economic plan to reduce the damage and remove barriers to private sector growth, open the borders safely and start work on high quality infrastructure projects.

“So far the Government’s only plan has been massive amounts of debt-fuelled spending, with no plan for economic growth or how to keep debt manageable.”

This government appears to think the quantity of its spend is a better measure of success than the quality.

What it’s doing is, Eric Crampton says, like borrowing money for a swimming pool after a house fire:

 . . .After suffering a housefire, an underinsured household would likely need to take on debt to deal with the problem – and that could be fine. But if it then took the opportunity to add a swimming pool to the property, while pushing the mortgage amount to the upper limit, one might wonder about the household’s prudence.

Similarly, the elected Government has been adding metaphorical swimming pools to its shopping list by extending the 2020 Budget beyond what was necessary to deal with the Covid crisis. This raises sharp questions about the Government’s commitment both to fiscal prudence and the Public Finance Act. . .

Borrowing in response to Covid-19 was necessary, but the amount of borrowing and what it’s being used for is far from prudent.

When the GFC struck the then National-led government committed to maintaining spending to protect the vulnerable from the sharp edge of the recession while requiring government departments to cut costs.

The government has talked about cutting red tape but done about it yet and hasn’t even mentioned requiring the public service to take a scalpel to its fat.

It’s pouring money into metaphorical swimming pools with no plan for rebuilding the house or repaying the mortgage.

 


%d bloggers like this: