Word of the day

May 8, 2020

Pertinacious – holding firmly to an opinion or a course of action; adhering resolutely to an opinion, purpose, or design; extremely or perversely persistent; stubbornly tenacious.


Kiwi charity secures New York Times Square billboard for World Ovarian Cancer Day

May 8, 2020

A media release from Cure Our Ovarian Cancer:

Friday May 8th is World Ovarian Cancer Day, and a young New Zealand woman, Jane Ludemann, has instigated a huge billboard campaign in New York’s Times Square to raise awareness and funding support for the often overlooked deadly disease.

“This campaign is about ensuring women living with ovarian cancer the world over experience hope for a better future. At times it can feel like we’re alone, almost as if we’re in an empty Times Square. That is why we need more eyes on this disease and more investment in research and hopefully we’re making that point with our new campaign,” says Ludemann.

In 2018 a young Canadian model, Elly Mayday, stood in Times Square in her teal underwear to raise awareness and funding for ovarian cancer research. She died of the disease ten months later but her efforts inspired Brianna Wagner to stand in her place in 2019. In 2020, the research charity, Cure Our Ovarian Cancer, planned to mark the day again with an organised fundraising event that involved sixty ovarian cancer sufferers from around the globe gathering in Times Square. 

Unfortunately Covid-19 restrictions made this impossible but Jane, also an ovarian cancer sufferer and founder of Cure Our Ovarian Cancer, was determined to continue the campaign and went on to secure one of the largest billboard’s in Times Square. Ludemann enlisted creative and digital agency Topham Guerin to develop the campaign to highlight the need for crucial research into curing the dangerous cancer, and honour the contribution of Elly Mayday.

Cure Our Ovarian Cancer is a New Zealand based charity dedicated to improving the survival of women with low-grade serous carcinoma. Founded in 2018, they raise funds directly, and through partner organisations in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand. They want to see the survival rates of Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma (LGSC) reach those of breast cancer.

About Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian Cancer is the most lethal of all women’s’ cancers, the death rate being double that of breast cancer and it is the seventh most common cancer worldwide. Every year more than 300,000 women are diagnosed with the disease – about the daily number of people that pass through Time Square each day (330,000) – and 180,000 women will die from it. By 2024 the incidence of ovarian cancer will increase by 47% and the number of deaths each year will rise to 293,000 it is predicted. 

Background – Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma (LGSC)

Jane Ludemann was diagnosed with LGSC in 2017. LGSC is an often incurable subtype of ovarian cancer that disproportionately affects young women. Half are diagnosed in their 20s, 30s and 40s and the initial treatment usually consists of menopause inducing surgery, chemotherapy and/or hormone inhibitors.

In 1997 research showed the addition of hormone inhibitors like Letrozole could double the time it takes for a woman’s cancer to return. Letrozole received FDA approval for breast cancer in 1998.

“A 20 year delay in cancer treatments is unacceptable” says Ludemann. 

She was shocked to discover fewer research papers per year were being published on her ovarian cancer per year than on breast cancer papers per day.

“It was hard to believe just how little research was happening anywhere in the world for the cancer trying to kill me.”  

In 2018 she founded research charity Cure Our Ovarian Cancer to raise crucial funds to help researchers find treatments to improve survival.

“It’s a horrible, horrible silent killer and being diagnosed feels really isolating. But, despite what they are going through, we are an amazing community and this is what drives Cure Our Ovarian Cancer.”

“It’s really hard at any age to get this diagnosis, harder still to be diagnosed when you’re in your 20s, 30s and 40s. Elly was really brave and was one of the first women to be really public about her journey, and other women diagnosed looked up to her,” Ludemann says. “This is why we wanted to honour her memory and generate a conversation around ovarian cancer research. It also helps other sufferers to know they are not alone when going through this.”

The theme of this year’s World Ovarian Cancer Day is powerful voices and while there won’t be many people in Times Square because of the lockdown the billboard will provide a powerful voice to raise awareness of the disease and the need for research funding.

The billboard will go live at 4pm New Zealand time (midnight in New York).

You will be able to see it here


5 things every woman & those who love them should know

May 8, 2020

Every woman and those who love them should know about ovarian cancer.

If it is diagnosed early – at stage 1 when the disease is confined to the ovary – survival rates are high.

But ovarian cancer is often diagnosed late when it has spread into the abdomen, and further, and survival rates then are much, much lower.

Lack of knowledge about the disease is one reason it is so often diagnosed late. Another is that the symptoms can be vague and can often be for other, far less serious, conditions.

My daughter had been to her GP for two years with symptoms.

She has a rare subtype of ovarian  – low grade serous carcinoma – which disproportionately strikes younger women.

Sally Rae wrote Jane’s story in  survivor changing focus for the ODT.

Clare de Lore wrote about Jane in  how an ovarian cancer patient is fighting the myth of the ‘silent killer’ for The Listener.

Katie Kenny interviewed her for we’re comfortable talking about breast cancer, but ovarian cancer remains a forgotten disease on Stuff.

Dunedin Central Rotary Club reviewed her speech here.

Jane has a blog janehascancer.com

If you missed my blog post with Jane’s story, you’ll find it at  living under cancer sword.

You can learn more, and donate to lifesaving research at Cure Our Ovarian Cancer


Sowell says

May 8, 2020


Rural round-up

May 8, 2020

Concern farmers’ wellbeing affected: –  David Hill:

North Canterbury Rural Support Trust chairman Andy Munro is concerned for the wellbeing of farmers as they negotiate the ongoing effects of a dry season and the Covid-19 lockdown.

He said last month’s rain was “a great morale booster” for farmers in the drought-affected area in North Canterbury.

“Since that rain four weeks ago, things went pretty quiet. But it’s just a pity we haven’t had a follow-up rain and we really need a good warm follow-up rain, particularly for the farmers from Waipara north to get some growth before winter.

“It’s starting to get dry and cold in that northern part, but other than that it’s business as usual. . . 

Farmers need to be heard not patronised:

The Government’s drought recovery advice fund announced today is merely a drop in the bucket for supporting farmers affected by drought, National’s Agriculture spokesperson Todd Muller says.

“The fund is specifically for providing affected farmers with recovery and planning advice, but does not contribute to farmers’ rising feed costs or general business costs.

“Most farmers already know what is needed to help their business recover and it is insulting for the Government to tell them they simply need to seek more advice to get through the drought. . . 

Rural GPs not just another business – Peter Burke:

Rural General Practice Network chair Dr Fiona Bolden is disappointed that the Government is treating rural general practices the same as any other business in the community.

Bolden told Rural News that rural GPs were expecting to get two payments from the Government to assist them financially.

However, she says while they had received the first payment, Cabinet vetoed the second payment – just days before it was expected to be paid.  . .

Differing responses to wage subsidy scheme – Allan Barber:

The country’s meat processors have followed two distinctly different paths in response to the government’s wage subsidy scheme which is available to all businesses for 12 weeks, providing they can substantiate a 30% drop in revenue during the period. Silver Fern Farms, Alliance, ANZCO, Taylor Preston and Blue Sky Meats have all claimed the subsidy to varying extents, whereas AFFCO, Greenlea and Wilson Hellaby have decided it is not justified or necessary, at least partly on ethical grounds.

The contrast in approach has already been commented on by independent economist, Cameron Bagrie, who has slammed the two largest claimants, SFF which has claimed $43 million and Alliance $34 million, for taking advantage of taxpayer funding when they are classified as an essential business, operating in lockdown. Equally Bagrie complimented those companies not making a claim because they were getting on with business as usual. Speaking to The Country’s Jamie Mackay, he said “the wage subsidy is out there to support businesses that are getting clobbered, that are effectively in lockdown.”

I am not convinced this interpretation is either totally fair or even correct. Both SFF’s Simon Limmer and Alliance’s CEO David Surveyor are clear the wage subsidy is not a company entitlement, but is paid directly to various categories of employees: firstly it maintains standard wage rates at normal processing speeds despite the 30-50% reduction to meet distance requirements, it retains those who would have to have been terminated seasonally, and it is used to pay those who cannot work e.g. because of age,  compromised immunity or family circumstances. . .

Community to the rescue for harvest – Toni Williams:

CharRees Vineyard owners Charlie and Esma Hill put a call out on social media for help to harvest during lockdown.

They were so overwhelmed by community response, including some from Christchurch, they had to turn people away.

The lockdown harvest, approved by Ministry for Primary Industries as essential for food and beverage production, attracted about 20 people from Ashburton and Methven — many who had never harvested grapes before — to put their hands up to help.

The pickers worked alongside family members of the couple and vineyard workers to pick the first of three annual grape harvests. . . 

Red meat exports top $1 billion in March 2020, a first for monthly exports:

The monthly value of New Zealand red meat and co-product exports topped $1 billion for the first time, according to an analysis by the Meat Industry Association (MIA).

Total exports reached $1.1 billion in March 2020, an increase of 12 per cent on March 2019.

While overall exports to China for the month of March were down by nine per cent compared to last March as a result of COVID-19, exports to all other major markets increased, demonstrating the agility and resilience of the New Zealand red meat sector. . . 

Time to take ag reform out of the “too hard basket” – Fiona Simson:

Regional Australia is well placed to be the engine that powers Australia’s COVID-19 recovery. The bush has done this before, with strong exports helping keep recession at bay during the Global Financial Crisis.

And, after a challenging period of drought, bushfires and floods, widespread rainfall has seen the fortunes of farmers begin to improve. Agriculture is ready and raring to grow.

As we dare to cast an eye to the world post-COVID-19, now is the opportune time to consider the changes agriculture and regional Australia needs to best contribute to the recovery task. . . 


Cancer isn’t cancelled

May 8, 2020

Covid-19 has cancelled many things but cancer isn’t cancelled.

It’s World Ovarian Cancer Day.

  1. A Pap test (cervical smear test) does not detect ovarian cancer
  2. Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage
  3. Diagnosing Ovarian cancer before it spreads makes it much more treatable
  4. Symptom awareness might lead to quicker diagnosis
  5. Common symptoms include:
    a. Persistent bloating
    b. Difficulty eating
    c. Feeling full quickly
    d. Pelvic/abdominal pain
    e. Urinary symptoms

 

Around one in 70 New Zealand will be diagnosed with the disease this year.

Around one in 1,000 will, like my daughter Jane, have the rare subtype low grade serous ovarian cancer that disproportionately strikes younger women.

 

You can learn more at: cureourovariancancer.org

Follow Cure Our Ovarian Cancer on Facebook and  Twitte and Instagram.

Jane’s personal blog is janehascancer.com

 


Why are we waiting?

May 8, 2020

The Ministry of Health’s Covid-19 website gives details of case numbers as at 9am each day.

But it’s not updated until at least 1pm.

Why are we waiting until then?

Is there a good reason, or is it only so we can have what is becoming an increasingly tiresome double act for the media from the Beehive?

In the first few days it was a good idea for the Director General of Health Ashley Bloomfield and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to give daily briefings, to inform, reassure the public and to answer questions from journalists.

The DG fronting each day is probably still a good idea but the daily pairing with the PM is not.

Seeing only her, highlights the absence of other Ministers. It raises questions about why they aren’t fronting and none more so than Minister, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis is nowhere to be seen when that sector has been hardest hit by the lockdown.

The tourism sector is imploding, countless jobs are being lost, and many are left with a feeling of uncertainty. . .

What tourism businesses desperately need is a leader to articulate a message of hope. It needs Davis to proactively front the media, on a regular basis, to give an idea of what the Government is doing to save the sector. Because fronting the media gets the message out to operators, who are in the middle of making big decisions about their futures. . .

Davis, like most other Ministers is kept well away from the media.  Giving us only the daily duet is in danger of politicising the Director General because as each day goes by it looks more and more like the purpose is not so much to inform the public as to promote the PM.

Take yesterday’s announcement of what the step down to Level 2 will entail.

It could have been issued as a media release followed by the opportunity for questions from media.

Instead the PM read it out in minute detail as if to a group of young children, and ones with comprehension problems at that.

Or at least that’s what the first bit sounded like. I gave up listening after a very few minutes because I had better things to do with my time and a PM overseeing what could well turn into the worst economic depression in our history  ought to have too.

Ardern is Labour’s, and the government’s, most popular figure but these daily deliveries are in danger of turning into far too much of a good thing.

Much more of this and she’ll find more and more of her audience will be following Pooh’s example of getting into a comfortable position for not listening.


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