Word of the day

May 6, 2020

Aubade – a poem or piece of music appropriate to the dawn or early morning; song or instrumental composition concerning, accompanying, greeting or evoking daybreak; dawn serenade; love poem or song welcoming or lamenting the arrival of the dawn; a poem or song of or about lovers separating at dawn.


Sowell says

May 6, 2020


Rural round-up

May 6, 2020

Turning the environmental table on urban households – Cameron Bagrie:

Farmers have worn the pointed fingers on the envirionment despite most playing by the rules and many doing even better than what the rules require. It is rural communities we can thank for much of the environmental progress we’ve already made.

There are isolated instances of poor behaviour – just as in any industry, but in aggregate, farmers are moving forward.

Increasingly, farmers have been required to operate under Farm Management Plans (FMPs), against which their environmental performance is audited.

City folk should consider what their equivalent of an FMP – call it a Household Management Plan – would look like. . .

New Zealand Agricultural Show cancelled  – Tracy Neal:

The South Island’s largest springtime event, the New Zealand Agricultural Show, has been cancelled for the first time since World War 2.

Organisers said public safety concerns and a fragile financial position were behind the decision to cancel this year’s November show.

The Canterbury A&P Association made the announcement today, saying the likelihood of a lingering response to the Covid-19 crisis made planning for such a large event untenable.

It was now also calling for public help to secure the event’s long-term future. . .

Two-pronged approach needed to address dairy staff shortfall:

DairyNZ is calling on the Government to work with the dairy sector to address a looming staff shortage for the coming season, that has been exacerbated by the impacts of COVID-19.

By the end of September around 2500 visas are due to expire for migrant staff currently working on dairy farms. Many are based in Canterbury, Waikato, Southland and Otago. Both farmers and farm staff are desperately seeking certainty.

“We estimate that even if all migrant dairy workers currently in New Zealand were retained, there could be a shortfall of up to 1000 employees for the coming dairy season,” said Dr Tim Mackle, DairyNZ chief executive.

“This suggests that we are going to need to take a two-pronged approach to address the staffing shortfall that will include both retaining our migrant workforce and recruiting new Kiwis into our dairy sector. . .

NZ coconut and avocado oil producer to expand into the Pacific :

A New Zealand coconut and avocado oil producer, who is promising Pacific farmers much higher returns than they currently get, hopes to start operating within just months.

Whangarei-based Cocavo is headed by Chris Nathan who has been trying to set up operations in Fiji since 2018.

He said it’s taken awhile to find the right piece of land, and there were other difficulties, but they now have equipment, and building should soon be underway.

Mr Nathan said there is also strong interest from Luganville on Vanuatu’s Espirito Santo. . .

Safe domestic travel should be considered at Level 2:

The New Zealand Professional Hunting Guides Association and Game Animal Council are joining other tourism and recreation organisations in calling for an easing of domestic travel restrictions at Alert Level 2.

“Hunting guides, helicopter operators, accommodation providers and outfitters have suffered considerably through the lockdown,” says New Zealand Professional Hunting Guides Association President James Cagney. “Domestic travel will allow some of these businesses to restructure their offerings to New Zealand customers and keep operating.”

“While the industry has missed out on this year’s roar there is still fantastic late-autumn and winter hunting available, particularly for bull tahr, chamois, red stags and late rut sika. It would be fantastic if New Zealand hunters were able to get out and enjoy these opportunities and at the same time support the livelihoods of those in the industry.” . . 

Dairy processors warn on coronavirus disruption – Carlene Dowie:

Executives from two of Australia’s biggest dairy processors have warned that the COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting markets in ways not seen before.

Bega chairman Barry Irvin and Fonterra chief financial officer Marc Rivers told the Pac Partners/Westpac 2020 Agfood Virtual Conference on Wednesday having diverse manufacturing options had allowed them to adapt.

Both pointed to immediate lower commodity prices but saw glimmers of positivity for the future.

And both said there was a need for further rationalisation of Australia’s dairy manufacturing base. . .

 


Covid Cttee summonses re legality

May 6, 2020

Repeated refusals by the government to release the legal advice on the lockdown has prompted action:

The Epidemic Response Committee has today summonsed all legal advice provided to the Attorney General, Solicitor General and Police Commissioner to be released, Opposition Leader and Committee Chair Simon Bridges says.

“The people of New Zealand have given up their freedoms for this lockdown. We all deserve to know what legal basis was for the lockdown.

“The legality of the lockdown is highly questionable, that’s what academics, lawyers and the law society have said to myself and the Epidemic Response Committee.

“There have been many questions about the way the Police have operated under lockdown. National has been calling for the legal advice to be released but this was refused.

“New Zealanders have a right to know what the rule of law is.

“The Government tried to block to the release of this information but we have fought for it to be made public.

“The Police Commissioner, the Attorney General and the Solicitor General have five days to comply with the summons from the committee.

“New Zealanders should be proud of the efforts they’ve made during this lockdown but they also deserve to know whether the lockdown was legal.”

The more draconian the restrictions imposed on us, the greater the need for openness and transparency.

This isn’t North Korea where good communication is telling the public what the leader wants the people to know.

This is New Zealand where good communication should be giving the media, opposition and the public answers to questions we all have the right to ask.

 


Where’s kindness and empathy when it’s needed?

May 6, 2020

Heather du Plessis-Allan writes of a woman stuck in quarantine as her mother dies :

. . . She thought they were about to say yes today because she heard the PM yesterday say 18 people had been given permission. She thought that meant she was probably going to get a yes too.

Our producer had to tell her the PM was wrong, no one’s been given permission. She started crying on the phone.

Let’s be honest: she might not ever see her mum alive again.

The Ministry of Health is reviewing all 24 requests that they’ve declined, but that review will take most of the week. By then, this woman’s quarantine will probably be finished as she’s allowed out this weekend. But her mum might not make it to the weekend.

And the review doesn’t bode well for anyone else in quarantine hoping to say goodbye to loved ones.  The review’s being by the ministry’s legal team. Does that feel like the very people you’d send in to try to find a way to avoid having to change the decisions?

I don’t know how we’ve ended up with a health ministry so heartless and a Director-General of Health who isn’t sorry that this is happening.

He says his team are empathetic, but they’re not.  They’ve declined all the requests for exemptions. 

I read the judgement last night in the case of Oliver Christiansen and it’s obvious the Ministry of Health doesn’t want to say yes. Either that or we’ve found a collection of the stupidest public servants in the country.

Every time Oliver asked for an exemption on the grounds of ‘exceptional circumstances’, they told him that he didn’t qualify for a medical transfer.

Of course he didn’t qualify for a medical transfer. He wasn’t sick. He wasn’t even asking for that, but they made it sound like that was the only grounds for an exemption, and it wasn’t.

So they’re either stupid or deliberately frustrating people who want to say goodbye to their parents. . .

How heartbreaking it must be to be so near yet so far away from a dying family member; to be stuck in limbo between home and the loved one’s death bed; to be prevented from spending those precious last days or even hours together.

The government has gone from being too slow to close the border and quarantine new arrivals to overseeing a Ministry which is being pig-headed in its refusal to let a few people through on compassionate grounds.

Covid-19 came from overseas and we can’t afford to have the good done by the lockdown undone by slackness at the border again.

But it must be possible to follow protocols to reduce the risk, such as those the court ordered Oliver Christiansen to follow in overturning the MOH’s refusal to allow him to visit his dying father:

. . .The judge said, in her assessment, overall justice “demands an effective and swift response”.

“I have in mind here particularly the imminence of Mr Christiansen’s father’s passing and the very material factor that visitation is only at a private home and not in a public space.”

She ordered the ministry to permit Christiansen to leave managed isolation to visit his father.

But he could only do so if he traveled unaccompanied by car to his dad’s home and remained there until his father died.

Christiansen was also told to maintain physical separation from other family members at the home and to return on his own within 24-hours of his father’s passing in the same car to the isolation facility for the remainder of the 14-day period. . .

If necessary family members could be required to self-isolate for 14 days from the time they had any contact with the traveller as a precaution to further reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19.

The border with Australia will be closed for weeks to months and visitors from other countries will be required to stay in quarantine for a fortnight for much longer. There will be many more people coming to New Zealand to be with dying family members in that time. Protocols must be worked out to allow them to do so safely.

And it’s not just the people in quarantine. Back to Heather:

This has been happening for seven weeks. For the entire duration of Level 4 Lockdown, people were forced to die alone in their hospital beds without any family or friends with them.

The Ministry of Health has lost perspective. In the battle against a disease, it has condemned families to a sorrow that will sit with them for the rest of their lives.

I am not proud of them. I want them to show compassion. I want them to take a dose of their own medicine.

Remember what their boss Ashley Bloomfield and the PM keep telling us? Be kind. They should try a bit of kindness themselves.

Keeping people apart at the end of life is inhumane.

The way the dying and their families have been, and are continuing to be, treated shows a complete lack of  the kindness and empathy we are all being enjoined to demonstrate.

Both must be applied in designing a way to allow families to be together when one of them is dying without risking the spread of Covid-19.


%d bloggers like this: