Lockdown National Anthems

25/04/2020

Cantores Choir united in voice from their individual lockdown bubbles all over the world.


Word of the day

25/04/2020

Embouchure – the way in which a player applies their mouth to the mouthpiece of a brass or wind instrument, especially as it affects the production of the sound; the position and use of the lips, tongue, and teeth in playing a brass or wind instrument; the mouthpiece of a musical instrument; mouth of a river.


Sowell says

25/04/2020


You’ll Never Walk Alone

25/04/2020

Captain Tom Moore set out to raise a few hundred pounds for the UK’s NHS.

He’s helped to raise more than £28m, that makes him not just a hero but a super hero.

He’s also become the oldest artist to score a number one hit – just in time for his 100th birthday next week.

 


Rural round-up

25/04/2020

Permission for private land hunting essential, Feds says:

Clarification of what hunting will be permitted after we move to COVID-19 Alert 3 is helpful, Federated Farmers says, but it is essential the hunters get permission to access private land.

“It’s good to have clarity on the rules that will apply, and that the government is continuing to strike a good balance between a planned return to where we were while keeping the risk of spread of the virus to a minimum,” Feds rural security and firearms spokesperson Miles Anderson said.

The government announced today that recreational hunting for big and small game will be allowed under Level 3 on private land only.   But, as has always been the case, hunters must gain the landowner’s permission. . . 

China’s wild meat clampdown affecting NZ venison exports :

New Zealand venison farmers are being caught out by the Chinese government’s moves to clamp down on the trade of wild meat.

The confusion has prompted some processors here to hold off shipping venison to the country.

China has been tightening its rules on the trade of wild meat in the wake of the Coronavirus outbreak, which is thought to have originated in a wild-animal market in Wuhan.

Silver Fern Farms chief executive Simon Limmer said despite the venison it processes and exports being a farmed product, not a wild one, there had been some clearance issues for shipments to the country. . . 

Farmers offer rural salute to Anzacs with hay bale poppies – Esther Taunton:

Paddocks around New Zealand have been peppered with giant poppies as the country prepares for a very different Anzac Day. 

With official services cancelled due to coronavirus restrictions, Kiwis are coming up with new ways to salute the fallen from the safety of their bubbles.

In rural areas, the humble hay bale has taken a starring role in commemorations, with oversized poppies springing up on farms across the country.

Southland farmer David Johnston said his family had been attending Anzac Day commemorations for years. . .

Whatever it is called, Gypsy Day will go ahead this year and cows will be mooved – but under strict COVID-19 controls – Point of Order:

Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor eschewed the words “Gypsy Day”, in a press statement yesterday that addressed dairy farmers’ concerns about what would happen on June 1.  He preferred “Moving Day” and said Moving Day will go ahead as planned this year, but with strict controls to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Reporting this news, Farmers Weekly explained that Moving Day is also known as Gypsy Day and occurs on June 1 each year when many dairy farming families, sharemilkers, contract milkers and employees move to new farms to start new jobs and milking contracts.

Yet another expression was incorporated in a Federated Farmers press statement headline on April 9:  GYPSY / MOOVING DAY. . .

Stunner’ vintage forecast in harvest like no other – Kerrie Waterworth:

Vineyard owners and winemakers are predicting this year’s vintage will be a ‘‘stunner’, which could be the silver lining to a harvest like no other.

Almost all the 170 vineyards represented by the Central Otago Winegrowers Association have started picking their grapes, but this year the pickers have had to abide by Alert Level 4 restrictions.

Maude Wines winemakers Dan and Sarah-Kate Dineen, of Wanaka, said it had made the harvest a more expensive and sombre affair.

‘‘Usually, it is a time to celebrate — we feed our crew well and they all dine together — but we have to change all that because of social distancing,’’ Mr Dineen said. . .

Horizons Ballance Farm Environment Awards winners praise NZGAPS approach to compliance:

Woodhaven Gardens, the 2020 Regional Supreme Winner at the Horizons Ballance Farm Environment Awards, are fans of how New Zealand Good Agriculture Practice’s (NZGAP) Environmental Management System (EMS) ‘add-on’ makes compliance more straight forward.

‘I see the EMS process as the way of the future. After going through the process, it is very clear that this is the path for the industry to go,’ says Woodhaven Gardens’ Jay Clarke.

The EMS ‘add-on’ complements a grower’s regular NZGAP audit, by including Farm Environment Plans (FEPs) in the suite of tools that NZGAP offers. FEPs are a way for growers to map their property and identify hazards to calculate their environmental footprint, and record improvements over time. . . 

Wattie’s in Canterbury completes a busy pea and bean season like no other:

Wattie’s completed its 24/7 pea and bean harvesting and processing season last Friday under conditions not previously experienced in its 50 year history of operating in Hornby, due to the restrictions imposed by COVID-19 protocols.

Like every other business operating essential services, Wattie’s field and factory staff based in Christchurch had to adapt quickly to the strict protocols developed in response to the Ministry of Primary Industry’s requirements.

Graham Broom, the Site Manager for Wattie’s in Hornby, said without question, everyone understood the reasons for the changes in our operations, but the new work practices added significantly to people’s workloads during an already busy time, particularly in the factory. . . 

Sweet charity – Bonnie Sumner:

The director of a South Island honey company is donating 21,000 jars of manuka honey to food banks – and he wants other companies to follow his example, writes Bonnie Sumner.

It’s only money, honey.

At least, that’s how Steve Lyttle of 100% Pure New Zealand Honey in Timaru is looking at it.

Due to a labelling mistake, ten tonnes’ worth of his company’s manuka honey mixed with blueberry cannot be exported as planned. . . 

 


Anzac Spirit

25/04/2020

The National Anzac Centre in Albany, overlooks the harbour from which 41,000 men and women from Australia and New Zealand, left to serve their countries in World War I.

Among the displays, is this sculpture, The Anzac Spirit.

 

 

 

You can read more about the sculpture, and Mary Selby, here.


Why Are They Selling Poppies?

25/04/2020

Why Are They Selling Poppies?

Why are they selling poppies, Mummy?
Selling poppies in town today.
The poppies, child, are flowers of love.
For the men who marched away.

But why have they chosen a poppy, Mummy?
Why not a beautiful rose?
Because my child, men fought and died
in the fields where the poppies grow.

But why are the poppies so red, Mummy?
Why are the poppies so red?
Red is the colour of blood, my child.
The blood that our soldiers shed.

The heart of the poppy is black, Mummy.
Why does it have to be black?
Black, my child, is the symbol of grief.
For the heroes who never came back.

But why, Mummy are you crying so?
Your tears are giving you pain.
My tears are my fears for you my child.
For the world is forgetting again.

–  Anon


Remembering

25/04/2020

Eight oaks line the road on the outskirts of Enfield. Another grows in the grounds of what was the school.

Under each is a stark, white cross on which is the name of a man who was killed in WWI.

Other such trees line Severn Street on State Highway 1 in Oamaru and more are planted through the town and district,

 . . .this living memorial is being cherished by the North Otago community. The men are not forgotten. Their memory is literally implanted in the landscape of Oamaru and North Otago.


Saturday soapbox

25/04/2020

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Lest we forget.


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