Word of the day

23/04/2020

Numbles – the entrails of an animal, especially a deer, as used for food; edible viscera (as the heart, lights, liver) of an animal; innards or offal of animals, particularly of deer.


Sowell says

23/04/2020


Rural round-up

23/04/2020

Farmstrong: focus on controlling what you can:

Learning to live with unexpected challenges is the key to getting through life in lockdown for Otago farmer Luke Tweed.

Luke and his family run a 730ha sheep and beef operation in Central Otago. It’s the family farm and he enjoys carrying on the tradition. 

“I love being able to work outside and with animals but the opportunity to bring up our kids on this farm is the really big one for us.”

Tweed, his wife Bridget and their four kids have coped okay with lockdown so far.  . .

Covid 19 coronavirus: Why New Zealand’s mānuka honey exporters are smiling again – Jamie Gray:

One of the strongest harvests on record, together with a big lift in sales resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic, have combined to brighten the outlook for New Zealand’s mānuka honey sector.

The harvest, which ends soon, is well up on last year, and mānuka honey is in demand overseas for its claimed health benefits.

It’s not all good news, however. Domestic sales aimed at the incoming tourism sector have been hit hard as countries go into Covid-19 lockdown and air travel subsides. . .

 

Free range chooks scoop top award – Richard Rennie:

Living a carefree life comprising a diet of bugs, apples and organic maize has earned the chickens raised by Hawke’s Bay brothers George and Ben Bostock New Zealand’s supreme food award.

The Bostock brothers were named the supreme champions for their organic whole chicken brand in this year’s Outstanding NZ Food Producer Awards. 

The firm was established by Ben five years ago.

Today the brothers supply organic, free-range chicken to butchers, supermarkets and the pre-covid-19 restaurant trade.   . .

Bumper maze crop despite drought – Pam Tipa:

Waikato owner-operated farmers Nacre and Anthony Maiden says the “stars aligned” this year to give them a particularly bumper maize crop despite the drought and their sandy loam soils.

However being flexible with their planting timing, good communication and use of their Herd Homes effluent all helped with their maize crop.

“We were impressed with their maize this year considering the soils we farm,” Nacre told Dairy News.  . . 

NZ’s top young Maori growers – Peter Burke:

The finalists in the inaugural Ahuwhenua Young Māori Grower Award have just been announced.

The finalists are:

• Twenty-four-year-old Brandon Darny Paora Ngamoki Cross, 24, works as trainee orchard manager for the large kiwifruit orchard management and post-harvest company Seeka.

• Maatutaera Tipoki Akonga, who is 26, works as a senior leading hand at Llewellyn Horticulture based in the Hastings area.

• Finnisha Nicola Letitia Tuhiwai, 25 who is a packhouse manager for Maungatapere Berries, located west of Whangarei.

Smithfield shutting U.S. pork plant indefinitely, warns of meat shortages during pandemic – Tom Polansek:

Smithfield Foods, the world’s biggest pork processor, said on Sunday it will shut a U.S. plant indefinitely due to a rash of coronavirus cases among employees and warned the country was moving “perilously close to the edge” in supplies for grocers.

Slaughterhouse shutdowns are disrupting the U.S. food supply chain, crimping availability of meat at retail stores and leaving farmers without outlets for their livestock.

Smithfield extended the closure of its Sioux Falls, South Dakota, plant after initially saying it would idle temporarily for cleaning. The facility is one of the nation’s largest pork processing facilities, representing 4% to 5% of U.S. pork production, according to the company. . .

 


Farmer’s Voice – May Brothers Contracting

23/04/2020

Farmer’s Voice:

The May brothers have come a long way since they bought their first header as teenagers. Now they’ve got no issues keeping busy with up to 35 machines running at a time. Wiggy heads down to Methven to catch up with Phil May and some of his staff at May Brothers Contracting to have a chat about what it takes to succeed in such a competitive market. 


What else will go?

23/04/2020

Covid-19 has claimed another victim:

Pharmac has frozen plans to fund a lung cancer drug that would have helped at least 1400 patients a year, saying it can no longer afford to make the investment.

The move has dashed hopes that Keytruda would soon be publicly funded for lung cancer – New Zealand’s biggest cancer killer. . .

What will follow?

Other drugs, other treatments, more research.

Health received $19.871 billion in the 2019/20 Budget. More than $9 billion has already been spent on wage subsidies as part of the response to the Covid-19 lockdown.

That’s a big hole to fill and it won’t just be health that gets less.

What was expected to be a vote-buying spend-up Budget next month will be much, much more restrained.

We’re told that most people support the lockdown, but how many understand the full costs, and not just in money but in businesses, livelihoods and lives?

How many would have been at least as supportive of a response that safe-guarded people from the rampant spread of Covid-19 while letting more businesses operate?

The insistence on using the arbitrary view of what’s essential rather than what’s safe has increased the economic and social costs of the lockdown while doing nothing at all to make it more effective.

I got an email last week telling me I could buy text books and any children’s reading material from Dunedin’s University Book Shop but I couldn’t get adult novels until after the lockdown was eased.

How could delivering an adult novel be any more risky than the other books deemed essential?

A friend needed a merino t-shirt as the one she uses for her daily walks is falling to bits. She went on line and found she could buy long-sleeved merino garments but not t-shirts.

Why is a t-shirt not essential when something with longer sleeves is, and how much more risk is there in packing, dispatching and delivering a t-shirt than in doing it for something with long sleeves?

Another friend’s elderly mother has her lawns mown by a man who brings his own mower.

Providing he stayed outside and kept at least two metres from her, how is that any more risky than her grandson coming with his mower, and keeping a safe distance, to cut her lawn?

There are very small examples, there are plenty more much bigger ones of constraints on commerce that should not have been imposed.

Health and safety in employment law is rigorous at the best of times, its requirements should be fit for the purpose of safeguarding employees and customers in these worst of times.

Had businesses which could have operated safely been able to do so the government would be spending less on welfare, staff subsidies and business support.

These businesses, and their employees, would be then be contributing to public coffers through tax, rather than taking from them.

That would have gone someway to reducing the cost of the lockdown and contributing to a swifter recovery.

It might not have been enough to save Pharmac from reversing its decision to fund Keytruda for lung cancer, but it would have made the difference between life and death for some businesses and the livelihoods of their staff.


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